The Movie Forums Top 100 of All-Time Refresh: Countdown

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minds his own damn business
Argentine is great at the time. Idk if 12 apes would also make it this occasion, but talk terry gilliam right now my mind is on the frame with munchausen, which impossible.
Fear loathing is good ride, but i think kinda swallowed by the test of time. Those are still his best streak as filmmaker, perhaps.
Time Bandits and Fisher King are also excellent.
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minds his own damn business
I didn't like the remake. I sort of agree with Argento on this one: “it did not excite me, it betrayed the spirit of the original film: There is no fear, there is no music. The film has not satisfied me so much.
I wanted to admire the film for totally ignoring Argento's style and going in a different aesthetic direction, and in at least a couple of the scenes (those notorious dance scenes; the dream sequence), I think it manages alright.


WARNING: spoilers below
Then it collapsed into one of the most ineptly garishly embarrasing climaxes, and threw in some unwanted political allusion to Holocaust guilt.



Either Guadagnino is ignorant of the Three Mothers myth, or choose to render it into nonsense. If I were Argento, I'd call it a betrayal as well.



I'm gonna be trashy and say that one of my favorite Bergmans is The Magician, which has some of the existential stuff but also a decent dose of thriller-y stuff.

Franny and Alexander is great and I honestly think you will really like it.

Wild Strawberries is a really solid film with some memorable imagery, but I think that it often suffers from an inflated reputation. I find it very charming.

Winter Light is very good, and leans very strongly toward the "inner life of the character" model. The performances are excellent.

Cries and Whispers is incredibly emotionally compelling.

The Silence is weird and wonderful.

The Virgin Spring is a more "conventional" narrative about revenge.

Hour of the Wolf leans more toward horror. I haven't seen it in over a decade, but I know I really liked it.

Through a Glass Darkly is amazing.

The Devil's Eye is a fun little comedy with some surprisingly good chemistry between the leads.

If I sat down and did my top ten Bergman films it would likely be...

1. Wild Strawberries
2. Fanny and Alexander
3. Virgin Spring
4. Scenes from a Marriage
5. Through a Glass Darkly
6. Summer with Monika
7. From the life of Marionettes
8. Cries and Whispers
9. The Magic Flute
10. The Magician

So The Seventh Seal didn't make my top ten of Bergman films it didn't make my top 25. To be fair though I really need to watch that and Persona again.



If I sat down and did my top ten Bergman films it would likely be...

1. Wild Strawberries
2. Fanny and Alexander
3. Virgin Spring
4. Scenes from a Marriage
5. Through a Glass Darkly
6. Summer with Monika
7. From the life of Marionettes
8. Cries and Whispers
9. The Magic Flute
10. The Magician

So The Seventh Seal didn't make my top ten of Bergman films it didn't make my top 25. To be fair though I really need to watch that and Persona again.
The thing about Bergman is that his films evoke very different emotions in me. Ranking them would be very hard because sometimes I want the off-kilter vibe I get from The Silence, while other times I want the simplicity of Winter Light. And sometimes I want the emotional high of Cries and Whispers.



Survivor 5s #2 Bitch
Well 24 of the points Suspiria received were from this gay


I just love it. The aesthetics, the design, the insane death sequences. Icons like Alida Valli and Joan Bennett sharing the screen. The plot is naff and yet the film works in spite of it. The score, pure eargasm. One of the most unique films I've ever seen and I love it more each time I see it.


Also inspired Clock Tower alongside Phenomena which is an amazing game and helped shaped survival horror in video games.


You other incredible beings who made this scrape into the top 100 are just constantly raising the bar for us all and doing it flawlessly.



I said yesterday the "first film you'd see" would involved Numbers and Animals. Well, there was a bit of a trick to that, because the "first film you'd see" is not #100, but in fact our lone Honorable Mention.

It gets Honorable Mention not just because it just missed the cut, but because it lost the #100 spot with the counting of the last ballot! It is:




The Seventh Seal

Ingmar Bergman, 1957


I've had the DVD of The Seventh Seal for a while, but I never got around to watching it. I finally watched it for this countdown, and it wasn't what I expected. I read that it was about a knight who played a game of chess against Death for his life, and I expected to see them actually playing chess and talking, but the movie was nothing like that. Maybe I'll like it more when I rewatch it, now that I know what to expect, but for now, it was only an okay movie for me.
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OPEN FLOOR.



I tried watching Brazil for this countdown, but I just couldn't get into it. It started off okay, but as it went on, I liked it less and less, and I eventually turned it off a little over an hour into the movie. Maybe I'll give it another chance someday. (Most likely if it gets nominated in a HoF.)

I have no interest in seeing Suspiria.



Hey, one of mine hit right from the top (or is it the bottom). I had Terry Gilliam's Brazil on my list at number nineteen. That accounts for only seven if its 69 points, but that was good enough to propel it onto the list. Brazil is one of those movies, like Citizen Kane and Apocalypse Now, where the behind-the-scenes story is as interesting as the finished film, which may in fact elevate it even higher than its purely artistic merits. In Brazil's case Gilliam's fights - some of them public - with the studio came not during shooting but after the production was completed, over the cut of the film and its release. Happily Gilliam's version has survived and thrived, thanks in large part to The Criterion Collection.

I managed to see Brazil during its brief theatrical run and many times on television and on VHS, including a trippy viewing of the "Happy Ending" cut on local TV late at night that inspired me to read and re-read Jack Matthews' 1987 book The Battle of Brazil: Terry Gilliam v. Universal Pictures in the Fight to the Final Cut. I wondered if Gilliam's true vision would ever be seen. The day the Criterion LaserDisc boxed set was released was a memorable one for me. I spent a glorious dozen hours or so obsessively pouring over the film itself and then the amazing wealth of extras.

It just had to be on my list of Top 25 movies. Even without my 27B/6 paperwork.

HOLDEN'S LIST
19. Brazil (#100)

The version of Brazil that I watched was disc 1 of the 3-disc Criterion Collection. Is there a different version? (I thought the other 2 discs were just extras.)



Hints for tomorrow (#98 and #97):


If these hints are supposed to be tricky, then one of the movies is probably something like Oceans 11 because George Clooney starred in the 2001 remake version, and Dean Martin starred in the original 1960 version.



The version of Brazil that I watched was disc 1 of the 3-disc Criterion Collection. Is there a different version? (I thought the other 2 discs were just extras.)
That is the version to see. The original U.S. cut was about ten minutes shorter and is not contained in the wealth of extras. Universal also drastically and outrageously recut the movie without any input from Gilliam. That version is about forty minutes shorter and is included in the Criterion extras.
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"Film is a disease. When it infects your bloodstream it takes over as the number one hormone. It bosses the enzymes, directs the pineal gland, plays Iago to your psyche. As with heroin, the antidote to Film is more Film." - Frank Capra



I've seen both Brazil and Suspiria, and like them both although it's been a while since I last saw them. Brazil I especially enjoyed when I first saw it, very playful and interesting, Suspiria I remember for its visuals and score.

Great work so far from Yoda and TUS, of course. Excited to see more.
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Also, as far as Suspiria goes, without spoiling anything, how does everyone compare it to the remake?
I consider it more a reimagining than a remake. It's too disconnected from its original to feel like a remake. For me, anyway.
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You're an enigma, cat_sidhe.



The truth is out there
I see the second post in the thread remains shy
Come on out to play lil second post, we won't hurt you.

*goes back to staring at the Who's Online section...
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Mumble is awful!



Please Quote/Tag Or I'll Miss Your Responses
My Bergman rankings in order:


The Seventh Seal
Wild Strawberries
Persona
Autumn Sonata
Shame
Summer With Monika
Scenes From a Marriage
Cries and Whispers
Brink of Life
Riten
The Passion of Anna
From The Life of the Marionettes
Face to Face
Winter Light
Saraband
The Serpent's Egg
Through a Glass Darkly (I'm going to try and watch this today)
The Virgin Spring
The Silence
Smiles of a Summer Night
The Magician
Hour of the Wolf



Thanks to everybody for the feedback on Bergman and Suspiria!
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The thing about Bergman is that his films evoke very different emotions in me. Ranking them would be very hard because sometimes I want the off-kilter vibe I get from The Silence, while other times I want the simplicity of Winter Light. And sometimes I want the emotional high of Cries and Whispers.
This is more or less what I was referring when I said that my reaction to the three I've seen was as disparate as it could've been. I mean, The Seventh Seal was more or less disappointment (probably because of heightened expectations). However, Smiles of a Summer Night was a very light and fun while Persona was very deep, very thought-provoking. It really got to me to the point that I had to see it twice in a week.