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The same applies for Raul and Vicky. Don't want to watch my nomination then don't participate in the HoF.
I did watch your nomination, genius.

The problem isn't that it's a Magical Girl movie. That's certainly enough to make me dislike it, but not enough to make me feel it should be ineligible. The problem is that it's really a series and does not work as a stand alone film. If you want to nominate a Magical Girl movie, then find one that is a proper movie and doesn't require watching television episodes or a whole other movie to be properly understood. I can assure you that I'm not likely to enjoy something like that, but I WILL watch it, just as I've already done for Nanoha.

And stop playing the victim and accusing the rest of us of xenophobia. Yours was one of at least four Japanese films to be nominated, including my nomination and Raul's nomination.



"Money won is twice as sweet as money earned."



So you will never watch the movie if you plan to read the book?

I don't think there is anything unreasonable about nominating an adaptation of a story first written for another venue.

Well, anyway I will change my nomination for the 2nd time then.



I am sorry but I can't watch the because I plan to read the book.
There is first and foremost because you nominated something that required a previous viewing to fully understand and put in context, while my nom is perfectly approachable as a standalone work; on the other hand, it's a franchise movie. Not even an adaptation, but a retelling. Here my own prejudices stand, but I don't have a good enough experience with retelling movies in anime to assume that it's going to be as fulfilling and well-rounded as the series.



I won't even discuss with you, Guap, you are below what I want to use my time on.

The fact that you actually try and defend your choices is hilarious and that you appearently "see nothing wrong" with them is even more hilarious. I made my points and that you do not get them is fine. But I'm done discussing with someone like you. I may be harsh now, but I think I have given you plenty of chances throughout my time on this forum and you make a lot of bullsh*t around here and especially the HoF has been a huge dumping ground for you. Not always, but often for sure.

And if I absolutely have to answer to parts of your reply, especially the one about how I should watch someone outside of what I'm used to or whatever, I'll refer you to MV's review of your "movie" and you'll have your answer... but yeah, it's not really worth discussing with you so I'm done.



Since I rewatched The Last Unicorn last week to determine whether or not I wanted to nominate it, I'm not going to watch it again during this HoF. I'm writing up a little introduction and some spoiler-free thoughts to post shortly (while it's still fresh in my mind), but it's gotten a little bit longer than I intended. No one's really talked about a nomination that's still in the HoF yet, so hopefully this will set off a trend haha.





The Last Unicorn (1982)
Dir. Arthur Rankin Jr., Jules Bass
Starring: Mia Farrow, Alan Arkin

The Last Unicorn is an animated fantasy film based on Peter S. Beagle's novel of the same name. While the film was a childhood favourite of mine, I've never actually read the book so I don't know how faithful of an adaptation it is. When I was considering nominating this film, I hadn't seen it in over 15 years, and while it didn't quite live up to nostalgia, I still thought it was worthy of inclusion.

Even though Rankin/Bass was an American production company, the actual animation for their films were outsourced to various Japanese animation studios. For The Last Unicorn, that studio was Topcraft, whose members later went on to form Studio Ghibli. So you might notice some stylistic similarities, though many of the human characters in The Last Unicorn have features that are far more exaggerated than what I remember seeing in most Ghibli films. I prefer imperfect, traditional animation to the clean lines of CG, so while I personally love the look of this film, I'd certainly understand if someone thought it was far too rough.

What I like the most about this film is what had the biggest impact on me when I saw it as a kid, and that is the darker atmosphere and general unhappiness that permeates the story. The themes are more mature, dealing with depression, regret, and the reality that not all dreams can come true. It's a very sobering experience if you're expecting a light-hearted children's film. That seems to be a common theme running through the films I remember the most fondly from my childhood, so it's really a shame that we don't see many films like that for children any more.

While I like most of the performances in this film, Jeff Bridges does a terrible job bringing his character to life, and both he and Mia Farrow have songs that made me turn the volume down so low I could barely hear it. Mia Farrow does otherwise do a really good job as the titular character, and Christopher Lee as King Haggard just feels perfect, though I could listen to him read anything and be content. Other than the aforementioned Farrow and Bridges songs, I like the rest of the music in this film, though after hearing NSP's cover of the main theme, I like the original version much less now.

As I've already said in the thread, I have no idea how this movie is going to feel to someone who has no nostalgia for it, and it doesn't seem like many (if any) of you have seen it before. Hopefully you can make it past that irritating butterfly at the start, because I promise the rest of the film is, at the very, least not that bad.
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I actually meant to watch Secret of Nimh today...but I have no idea what happened. Time just flew by and I don't know what I did all day. I have to work early tomorrow so unfortunately it's too late to put it on now.



I had actually intended to start with a rewatch of Wall E last night, but that didn't happen. Maybe I'll do it tonight.

I got a notice that Cagliostro is available to pick up from the library, so I'll probably go get that on Friday. Hopefully Treasure Planet will be ready to pick up by then as well.



Damn, people are jumping into this quick! A few hours ago I had dropped out for a moment.

I've had some busy days, actually I've seen the stress hit me again, so i'll havd to take it easy and slowly. That said, the movies probably won't be a problem, it's my schedule that has been busy, my work very much as well, so I'll just have to settle down a bit before diving in. After that the movies should be meditation for me... as it should be.



On second thought, I might do The Last Unicorn tonight. I can stream it free from my Amazon Prime account so I might start it at work after everyone else leaves (tonight is my turn to stay late).



There is first and foremost because you nominated something that required a previous viewing to fully understand and put in context
No it does not.

while my nom is perfectly approachable as a standalone work; on the other hand, it's a franchise movie. Not even an adaptation, but a retelling. Here my own prejudices stand, but I don't have a good enough experience with retelling movies in anime to assume that it's going to be as fulfilling and well-rounded as the series.
Nanoha Movie 2nd As is also a retelling.

Well, I have watched all the Nanoha franchise series and movies and I regard this the to be the best entry overall.

Anyway it's not your call to make since each person's nomination is made by the individual person, isn't it?



Nanoha Movie 2nd A's is number 35 in that list.

I didn't watch Genocyber and Project Eden before I wrote that list. I would certainly include both if I did a list now.

Well I actually did watch then as a kid but I had forgotten about them, now I remember both clearly after re-watching both after many years.



Yes, it does.

But I do love that this is coming from the same person who said this to me after finding out that I watched PMMM: Eternal without watching the first one.

Did you watch it without watching the first one? That's crazy. It's like reading a 650 page novel from page 400 onwards. Of course you wouldn't like it.



hahahaha. I'm deleting all of my past posts so none of my words come back to bite me as bad as that

Anyway, can we just move on? This Guap drama has dragged on for too long after the same thing in the 11th; i really can't be bothered with it.



I can't find much information on it. What little I can find calls it a "retelling" of the second season of the series - but I'm not sure if that means its newly animated or if it means that they just stuck episodes together and maybe added a few bits to smooth it out. It certainly feels like the latter.
It's entirely newly animated they even changed the art style substantially, it's not a compilation film (unlike the PMMMs films).

Either way it technically fits the requirements that I put forth in the Animation Countdown.

I've watched another fifteen minutes of it, which puts me at just over an hour and I really don't know what the hell is going on or even who is who, though I do intend to finish it. Maybe I've missed something but so far this simply doesn't work as a stand-alone film and is an absolutely horrible choice for a HOF nomination.

The only explanation I can come up with is that Guap is trolling us. No rational person would genuinely think this is a good choice for a Hall of Fame dominated by people who are not familiar with Magical Girl films/series, let alone this particular series. It's not a story, it's the middle of a story.

Technically it fits the rules set forth in the opening post, but the reality is that keeping it in the HOF is likely to do more harm than good and result in drop-outs, resentment, and lack of participation. It's up to you whether you want to give him a third chance, but I really think this thing needs to be given the boot.
Well, it's plotting is dense but it's a fully self contained narrative, just like Spider Man 2 doesn't require Spider Man to be understood.

Some people might have difficulty digesting a narrative that's different and more complex than typical Hollywood movies I guess (although it's not much more complex than the narrative of a movie like The Avengers). I like it in that it irons out the issues I had with the TV narrative although it's substantially altered from the one, now it's actually more clear cut for me. But I like fast paced narratives.

There is no "genre" requirements for understanding it, it's just a fantasy action movie like The Avengers but with more well fleshed characters and more serious tone (the only "magical girl" thing in it are transformation sequences that last 1-2 minutes). I though it was a great example of animated action movie with cool art style and cool plot. I like it that it doesn't have villains and good guys as well.

Although it's direction might not be very artsy, it's plain and conventional but the fast paced plotting compensates for that since it doesn't allow the viewer to judge the direction.

Trolling? I was thinking of nominating this for a HoF for two years already. I though of nominating it before K-On! but I decided on the K-On! movie because it's realistic setting might have been more accessible for a "mainstream audience". Anyway, what I am discovering is that otaku media is like heavy metal: only a restricted audience appreciates it and most people would think it's crap. Well, most of the good stuff is usually the stuff that the few like.

Well, I guess this is just the wrong type of forum to talk about animation seriously: People think that I am trolling if I suggest anything that doesn't fit a narrow ethnic conception of what an animated movie should be.