MoFo MC September: The Last Wave

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Peter Weir's
The Last Wave
(1977)



- In the present, it is terror, but in a still life, it's lovely

You all chose a culturally interesting film for our apocalypse theme, and you are lucky that our guest star Nebbit is 1) Australian, and 2) just young enough to have been around in the 70s. Our other guest star is Zotis, and of course you will recognize Yoda (or, if you're new, Yoda is the louder one). We all hope you enjoy this club's podcast, as well as the film, and will leave some thoughts about the podcast and/or the film.


- Dream is a shadow of something real

The best way to get it is to subscribe with iTunes. The next best is to plug the podcast feed into your RSS reader. And if you absolutely must do it the old-fashioned way, here's a plain old download link.




"Money won is twice as sweet as money earned."



Yeah, many thanks to both guests, who were great. And it's absurd how well-positioned nebbit was to talk about this film: she's Australian, and she saw the film back when it was in theaters!
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And when I'm all alone I feel I don't wanna hide
I look forward to hearing this. "The Last Wave" is actually one of my very favourite works, and Weir is one of my favourite filmmakers. It's a truly haunting, impeccably crafted piece. I may have a slight bias since I am Australian, but yeah, looking forward to this.



I'll take the plain old download link. Thanks, looking forward to it. Haven't seen the movie in years, though.
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"Don't be so gloomy. After all it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock."



Enjoyed listening to the podcast. Lovely to hear Nebbs and Zotis in real life, although Nebbs was a little hard to hear. Had to turn it up to hear her then you two were really loud!
It's ages since I watched The Last Wave, you made me want to watch it again
thanks for the podcast Chris, Susan and Ian



Yeah, sorry about the audio--calling all the way from the U.S. to Australia has its pitfalls, unfortunately. I'll see if I can find a way around that next time. But it's worth the effort--she had a lot of great insights to share.



If I've never seen this movie before, should I watch the movie before I listen to the podcast, or should I watch the movie while listening to the podcast, like a commentary?



Yeah, sorry about the audio--calling all the way from the U.S. to Australia has its pitfalls, unfortunately. I'll see if I can find a way around that next time. But it's worth the effort--she had a lot of great insights to share.
thanks!
yes Nebbs did . I liked the anecdote at the beginning Nebbs
It's interesting isn't it how someone from the culture or country of the film can reveal things you didn't know. I liked that bit.



If I've never seen this movie before, should I watch the movie before I listen to the podcast, or should I watch the movie while listening to the podcast, like a commentary?
Watch it before gbg, otherwise you won't know what they're talking about . It's not a commentary so the it jumps about in the story so it won't be worth listening and watching at the same time. Definately worth listening afterwards tho



Watch it before gbg, otherwise you won't know what they're talking about . It's not a commentary so the it jumps about in the story so it won't be worth listening and watching at the same time. Definately worth listening afterwards tho

Okay, Thanks for the info.



I have the movie at home right now through Netflix, will watch in the upcoming days
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Yeah, there's no body mutilation in it



The Last Wave (1977, Peter Weir)

Peter Weir's, The Last Wave is filled with spiritual symbolism to demonstrate the tension between Australia's white man and the Aboriginal people. The film has a really chilly feeling, especially in the house. With a very eerie score and the feeling/reality of constantly being watched, much of the film can be unsettling with out a lot happening. The mystery actually has a lot of the same feel as Blue Velvet.

It's hard for me to say to much that's deep, because honestly I didn't really like it. Many scenes felt way to over extended, mainly the end scene in the tribal sacred site. I did see some biblical symbolism, mainly the scene where it appears that it's raining frogs outside, reminded me of Moses. While the film might make the Aboriginal people appear as some voo-doo multi-prophet worshipers, the majority in reality are Christian or have no religious affiliation. I understand that the film is shown a select few who still believe in sacristy and aboriginal spirituality, but this isn't consistent with reality.



After the podcast maybe I will understand more of what the film was trying to say about the relation of aboriginal people and white man, but it seemed kind of drawn out in this film.




I just listened to this again. It was really fun doing it, and I liked the way Yoda mediated and directed the discussion. I find the sound of my voice a bit funny. I sound stoned or lethargic. Also the ending made me feel a little weird, the way it faded to music. I thought you, Yoda, actually saying thanks for participating and us all saying bye at the end would have been nice before the music kicked in.