Rate The Last Movie You Saw

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Borg vs McEnroe (2017)

I was huge fan of tennis as a lad and this was the rivalry that whetted the whistle. Different attitudes and different styles (base-liner vs serve and volley). Pleasantly surprised that, as a sports film, it really keeps the narrative tight and both performances are interesting. Shia LaBeouf looks dorky and self-obsessed as "SuperMac" and Sverrir Gudnason does well as the ice cool Swede that superstardom does not sit comfortably with. 2 minor issues, Borg was a V-shape with shoulders that would fit a "zoot-soot" and that was not well portrayed but the acting was great.

2nd issue, I'm not 7 anymore watching these guys go at it Still amazes me that Borg really retired at 26...both were great athletes.






THE BOY IN THE PLASTIC BUBBLE
(1976)

First viewing. A TV movie that stars John Travolta right before he made Saturday Night Fever and becoming a big movie star playing a kid who is quarantined in a bubble due to an immunity disorder he was born with. Watching it in the current era of the coronavirus pandemic didn't make it feel outdated, almost like the movie was ahead of its time. It's a sweet family film, and Travolta delivers a believable and subtle performance.
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ďLet me tell you something you already know. The world ain't all sunshine and rainbows. It's a very mean and nasty place and I don't care how tough you are, it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it. You, me, or nobody is gonna hit as hard as life. But it ain't about how hard ya hit. It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward. That's how winning is done!Ē ~ Rocky Balboa



Cure (1997)




This is a very good Japanese crime/mystery/psychological horror mix. Police are investigating sudden murders committed by normal citizens after meeting up with a young man who doesn't seem to even know anything about himself. It's a smart, moody, and well paced film. I enjoyed the first 2/3 that featured the what a little more, but the wrap up is pretty satisfying as well. Great rec from Captain Spaulding of a movie that was otherwise unknown to me.



Cure (1997)




This is a very good Japanese crime/mystery/psychological horror mix. Police are investigating sudden murders committed by normal citizens after meeting up with a young man who doesn't seem to even know anything about himself. It's a smart, moody, and well paced film. I enjoyed the first 2/3 that featured the what a little more, but the wrap up is pretty satisfying as well. Great rec from Captain Spaulding of a movie that was otherwise unknown to me.
Cure is pretty great. I feel like it has such an interesting premise, and then it does a wonderful job of balancing telling the audience information and leaving some things a bit vague/ambiguous.

A horror movie friend of mine absolutely swears by another film by Kurosawa called Pulse (aka Kairo). (I've been waiting for it to pop up on a streaming service, but I might just need to suck it up and pay for a rental). I would also recommend a film that he directed called Bright Future--it's more of a drama/sci-fi slow burn, but I thought it had kind of a dreamy horror to it.



Cure is pretty great. I feel like it has such an interesting premise, and then it does a wonderful job of balancing telling the audience information and leaving some things a bit vague/ambiguous.

A horror movie friend of mine absolutely swears by another film by Kurosawa called Pulse (aka Kairo). (I've been waiting for it to pop up on a streaming service, but I might just need to suck it up and pay for a rental). I would also recommend a film that he directed called Bright Future--it's more of a drama/sci-fi slow burn, but I thought it had kind of a dreamy horror to it.
I didn't like Pulse as much as Cure, not for lack of quality but more because of my taste. It's definitely worth seeing.








Thought I was going to be disappointed but loved every minute, and the Huntress made me laugh so much, perfect.





Snooze factor = Z

[Snooze Factor Ratings]:
Z = didn't nod off at all
Zz = nearly nodded off but managed to stay alert
Zzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed
Zzzz = nodded off and missed some of the film but went back to watch what I missed but nodded off again at the same point and therefore needed to go back a number of times before I got through it...
Zzzzz = nodded off and missed some or the rest of the film but was not interested enough to go back over it



Sophie's Choice (1982)



Agreed. I found Sophie's Choice to be underwhelming myself. Just another film panhandling for an easy "oscar grab."
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Imagine an eye unruled by man-made laws of perspective, an eye unprejudiced by compositional logic, an eye which does not respond to the name of everything but which must know each object encountered in life through an adventure of perception. How many colors are there in a field of grass to the crawling baby unaware of 'Green'?

-Stan Brakhage





Brave Archer and His Mate (1982)

3/5

Don't get me wrong, I love me some good kung fu and kung fu action... this was, at it's best, kung fu action and nothing else. Really disappointed. The narrative was boring, odd, and full on non-sequiturs, and not in a "good" bad way. Not my cup of tea.




THE TERMINATOR
(1984)

Re-watch. Terminator 2 might be a superior film, but the original is still a formidable classic sci-fi action thriller.



Becky 2020

Home invasion type thriller, (un)funny man Kevin James does an incredible u turn in his career playing a cold, calm and calculating white supremist and escaped convict looking for a mysterious key.. he did it so well I thought it was just somebody that looks like Kevin James right until the end credits....

young Becky still grieving the loss of her mother and angry that her father is getting remarried finds the perfect release for her teenage angst against these nefarious brutes.

not bad

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I wanna be sedated



Chinatown (1974)

Second watch. Stylish and well realised. I think the actual story itself is slight (though not as slight as sequel "The Two Jakes"). The actors are impeccable especially Faye Dunaway who manages to ooze aloofness and vulnerability wonderfully.

Polanski did a great job here.

I still laugh at Jake's joke kinda more Jake's telling of the joke but you get my drift





I love how during the 90s we had these erotic thrillers, that have these kinds of posters, with 2 people going at it, and they always knew how to choose the locations to make it as atmospheric as it can be, palm beach is just a dream location to me where sex and murder is interepreted here to the full, i love 90s films
Lorraine bracco is just a dream girl, and nancy travis never looked better, she s as hot as it can be here



Cure is pretty great. I feel like it has such an interesting premise, and then it does a wonderful job of balancing telling the audience information and leaving some things a bit vague/ambiguous.

A horror movie friend of mine absolutely swears by another film by Kurosawa called Pulse (aka Kairo). (I've been waiting for it to pop up on a streaming service, but I might just need to suck it up and pay for a rental). I would also recommend a film that he directed called Bright Future--it's more of a drama/sci-fi slow burn, but I thought it had kind of a dreamy horror to it.
You have a smart friend When we did the top-100 Horror countdown I had Pulse at #4 on my ballot. It's such a melancholic and depressing film. I still haven't seen Cure but it's been on my watchlist for ages.
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The Raid 2. (2014)






The action scenes were just as epic and brutal as in the original but the story was less focussed and streamlined. This film relies more on a conventional story structure that I felt I'd seen a dozen times before in action films (undercover cop on a revenge mission). It was overlong and let down by mediocre performances and poor characterization. It's the fight scenes that made this film good; truly awesome to behold. I'll never look at a hammer the same way again...


3/5 Stars.



You have a smart friend When we did the top-100 Horror countdown I had Pulse at #4 on my ballot. It's such a melancholic and depressing film. I still haven't seen Cure but it's been on my watchlist for ages.
Yeah, he might know a thing or two.

If you dug that Pulse had a dose of melancholy, you'll probably also enjoy that aspect of Cure.

While I often have a negative reaction to horror movies that are overly pessimistic (ie when it's clear from the first minute that every character you like is going to die, that the evil/bad characters are going to win, etc) and kind of disconnect from them, movies that are melancholy (sad but still tinged with hope) can really draw me in.



2001 Monolith spotted at McDonald's Drive Thru
Brewster's Millions
8/10.
A movie I've loved since I was a kid. It's a riot.

I also found out that it's a remake from a 1945 movie and it was based on novel. I'll definitely check those out.

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2001 monolith recently seen at McDonald's Drive Thru



Voyeur - 7.5/10
I was looking for something on Netflix (since most of it is crap, but hey, free trial) and saw "Voyeur". It could have been made better. It started to go downhill towards the end, when a lot of focus was on the write, Gay Talese, and some discrepancies, but it would have been nice if they would have had someone with an interest in voyeurism going into the psychology of it, or maybe the details of observation.
Watching the watcher is now the new role for this voyeur.

I can see where you're coming from. I almost didn't watch it because of the "kink" factor, but being a documentary I anticipated that it would NOT include any graphic stuff-- which it didn't.

Right from the git-go I was directed more toward the relationship between the voyeur, Gerald Foos, and the writer, Gay Talese. I haven't read much of Talese's journalism in NYT or Esquire, but I had read his Honor Thy Father (1971) --about the Bonanno crime family-- and it knocked me out. So I was aware of Talese's talent, and was interested in how he got onto the Foos' Manor House Motel voyeurism set-up.

To me the story really was about the two men, how they related, and what happened with their friendship, especially following Talese's article in The New Yorker, and subsequent book. Gerald Foos was a very unusual guy, but yet strangely moralistic. I was happy the way the thing resolved.

The documentary itself by Miles Kane and Josh Koury was exceptionally well done. IMO the pacing was good, along with the syntax, and they used some rather innovative cinematography. I enjoyed it, and appreciated your heads-up.