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Time Lapse (2014, Bradley King)


Interesting - though awfully confusing - time travel concept, unfortunately marred by amateurish execution and mediocre acting (IMO).
Usually I tend to like indie sci-fi mind-bender type flicks, but this one didn't click.



Strange but true (2019)

Effective little thriller with a good cast. The "something in the woodshed" is pretty predictable but the performances are strong.



Sparrows (William Beaudine & Tom McNamara, 1926)
+
Fairly dark tale sadly doesn't really fly as given too family-friendly a treatment for my liking
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Almost famous for having nailed Madonna once



Shadows: The Dark Streets of Kimball's Green (TV, 1976) – 5.5/10

The first episode of series 2, featuring a more elaborate, animated title sequence. The sequence is certainly very stark and well-made but I feel that it confined the action too much to the, then, present-day. There's something timeless about the original – a simple flickering candle – that conveys a better atmosphere and opens up more possibilities in the imagination.

This is the closest episode yet for breaking away from the patterns familiar in the first series, and – but for the resolution – it could have done so comprehensively. I found it particularly noteworthy from a social history perspective. There's a real sensation of history haunting the present as we hear the conversation about Ancient Britons while seeing images of the contemporary streets and the people living in 1976. The foster care setup brought to mind harrowing accounts of the abuse of evacuees in WWII – in fact I recently saw David Harewood's documentary about Birmingham at that time, with similarly upsetting stories recounted. The worst moment in this episode, and especially relevant today, is the social worker who can see that the foster carer is unfit, makes a weak attempt at asking the little girl whether she's happy there, and then just goes off to see the next child on the list. A cautionary tale indeed.



I thought this movie was so funny when I caught it on tv for the first time. Would love to revisit it, it's my favourite film starring the two of them.

For my money, they never topped Silver Streak



Crash (2004)

I'm very late seeing this, but I suppose it's still relevant given the times.... This wasn't bad, but it felt more like an extra long TV show than a movie. The racial themes were very in your face, and likely intentionally. However, it felt forced and unnatural in many moments.



cricket's Avatar
Registered User
Booksmart (2019)




It was good, pretty much what I expect from these movies these days. Nothing special. Sometimes the leads were annoying but I guess that comes with the territory. I enjoyed it all the way through but will forget it soon enough. Crap soundtrack.



[center]Booksmart (2019)



It was good, pretty much what I expect from these movies these days. Nothing special. Sometimes the leads were annoying but I guess that comes with the territory. I enjoyed it all the way through but will forget it soon enough. Crap soundtrack.
I cant wait to rewatch this to see if my rating drops a bit because of the reasons you listed here. Gave it a 4/5 when I saw it in the theater, but I can see how the leads' energy level can get distracting.




Powder (1995, Victor Salva)


This actually had a pretty good cast, and some of the acting was decent. Bad news is, it was way too bland and sappy, plus I had a hard time connecting with the main character. I'm sorry but he was just annoying to no end. The plot was frustrating in that it didn't go in any of the directions that I thought would be satisfying (which, to me, is key for this type of movies). Too cliched and predictable too - from the moment I saw the wife of Lance Henriksen's character on her death bed terminally ill - and that was fairly early on - I knew Powder was going to use his supernatural powers to help him. So he did. The ending didn't help matters either, with a fantasy melodrama-type epiphany capping things off in the same bland way.

Btw, my low rating has nothing to do with the fact that the film was directed by a convicted child molester (which I didn't know prior to watching). But, even without knowing it, the "touching" scene between Powder and the teacher (Jeff Goldblum), while completely innocent and spiritual on the surface, did feel vaguely uncomfortable, and I couldn't understand why. Definitely an underlying subtext going on there - subtle but nonetheless.



Mistress America (Noah Baumbach, 2015)

Contains the occasional piece of witty dialogue but the staccato delivery reduces it to mere noise at times



Weekend re-watches:



2nd re-watch...Tim Burton's masterpiece about the greatest schlock movie director of all time holds up beautifully as grand entertainment. Johnny Depp should have received an Oscar nomination for his exuberant and passion-filled performance in the title role and Martin Landau's Oscar-winning performance as Bela Lugosi is funny and moving, but was he really better than Samuel L Jackson in Pulp Fiction? If the Academy wanted to honor Landau, he should have won for Crimes and Demeanors.






In a word, this movie is just magical, even on the 7th or 8th viewing. This movie's magic is attributed to one thing...the genius of Damien Chazelle, one of my favorite and most deserving Best Director winners and the ending DESTROYS me.




"Honor is not in the Weapon. It is in the Man"

Bloodline (Henry Jacobson, 2019: There is a film that every actor will tend to make to break out of their typecast. Some good, some bad. This is one of the cases that it is good because "Stifler" himself, Seann William Scott, goes dark as Even Cole, a high school guidance counselor who goes unhinged after the birth of his son as he learns his students have deadbeat dads and it becomes the trigger for him to begin targeting these dads. Scott is excellent in the role and over midway, a jaw-dropping twist happens and makes the film even more watchable.
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Powder (1995, Victor Salva)


This actually had a pretty good cast, and some of the acting was decent. Bad news is, it was way too bland and sappy, plus I had a hard time connecting with the main character. I'm sorry but he was just annoying to no end. The plot was frustrating in that it didn't go in any of the directions that I thought would be satisfying (which, to me, is key for this type of movies). Too cliched and predictable too - from the moment I saw the wife of Lance Henriksen's character on her death bed terminally ill - and that was fairly early on - I knew Powder was going to use his supernatural powers to help him. So he did. The ending didn't help matters either, with a fantasy melodrama-type epiphany capping things off in the same bland way.

Btw, my low rating has nothing to do with the fact that the film was directed by a convicted child molester (which I didn't know prior to watching). But, even without knowing it, the "touching" scene between Powder and the teacher (Jeff Goldblum), while completely innocent and spiritual on the surface, did feel vaguely uncomfortable, and I couldn't understand why. Definitely an underlying subtext going on there - subtle but nonetheless.



Can't believe, I searched this trash all over the internet for years. Could't remember the name of the movie. Watched at some random night in television. All this years I was searching for a movie with a "blue guy"... and well, he's not blue... now I know why I could't find
Lmao
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