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Comedy Central Roast of Alec Baldwin 2019 Directed by Joel Gallen

Robert DeNiro, Jeff Ross, Paul Anka and Alec Baldwin himself were great.
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The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada 2005 Directed by Tommy Lee Jones

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"Money won is twice as sweet as money earned."



Welcome to the human race...
Enter the Dragon -


Not bad, but could've used some magic ninjas who could freeze people or throw spear-robes out of their hands.
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Way too much stupid talk on the forum. Iroquois, I’m thinking about you.



Did you @Gideon58 ( or anyone else here ) ever see and review a movie called
The Public (2018) ?

I saw it recently and was interested in what others thought of it. (As a personal note, I thought the subject was worth examining, but felt it could have been handled better)

I've heard of The Public but I never saw it.





Re-watch of a very good movie. I have enjoyed every one of director Yorgos Lanthimos’ movies except for The Favourite.
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Les Vampires [The Vampires] (Louis Feuillade, 1915-16)

Originally serialised with an often increasingly fanciful plot that although providing a reasonable level of Saturday matinee style entertainment can become a little tiresome when watched as a single entity .... so imo almost certainly remains best watched in serial format (also still not sure whether Mazamette's character is an overall asset or liability to enjoyment tbh)
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Purely for the benefit of my bad memory: 2016 • • • 2017 • • •
2018 • • • 2019 • • • Summer • • • Noms


Almost famous for having nailed Madonna once



Jelgava 94 (2019)
It made me super nostalgic. Like going back to times when I was younger.

One of rare good Latvian movies.



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The Broadway Melody (1929)




About sisters trying to make it on Broadway, and it wasn't a bad watch. I'm not the person to make a judgment on a musical but I thought it was ok. The first talkie best picture winner, and I would assume one of the first musicals. It probably took home the Oscar because it was something new and different; how else to explain 35% Rotten Tomatoes and 5.7 IMDb.



The Broadway Melody (1929)




About sisters trying to make it on Broadway, and it wasn't a bad watch. I'm not the person to make a judgment on a musical but I thought it was ok. The first talkie best picture winner, and I would assume one of the first musicals. It probably took home the Oscar because it was something new and different; how else to explain 35% Rotten Tomatoes and 5.7 IMDb.
I love The Broadway Melody, but then I'm a sucker for a love story.



Just watched 2 films the last 2 days.
First was The Dawns here are Quiet (1972)
4 out of 4. Great film and incredibly sad at the end
The Manchurian Candidate (1962)
3 1/2 out of 4
Great thriller, and the last 15 mins are amazing.



Welcome to the human race...
Road House -


"I see you found my trophy room, Dalton. The only thing that's missing...

...is your ASS."



Who's That Knocking at My Door (Martin Scorsese, 1967)


Evidently a couple of ideas strangely edited into one for whatever reasons, but a lot of promise in the film. A great performance by Harvey Keitel, in particular in the religious relationship storyline.

Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (Martin Scorsese, 1967)


A stronger effort here, with a couple of great performances. Really interesting to see Scorsese tackle a strong female character at the centre of the film. Kris Kristofferson has such a strong screen presence, I could watch him all day.

The Color of Money (Martin Scorsese, 1986)


Really had high hopes for this as I am a massive pool fan and player (albeit British 8-ball, blackball rules), and love The Hustler, so I was hoping this would be an underrated favourite. Unfortunately not, the characters including Newman's are just standard caricatures, and the plot and screenplay are very weak, the ending story and resolution left me very disappointed.

Phantom Thread (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2017) [Cinema]


Loved the cinematography of this film, the camerawork up close and personal. Lots of close-up and shots focussed on fine details and objects, and the movement of the camera between the various rooms and switching between characters helped build the power dynamics. It reminded me of Hitchcock in films like Rebecca and Notorious, and Max Ophuls too who has obviously had a big influence on Anderson. Another great Greenwood score too. The story was a bit weak I thought, and I never truly felt gripped or enthralled by it, I wish Anderson would make another Boogie Nights.

Call Me By Your Name (Luca Guadagnino, 2017) [Cinema]


A film definitely worth the watch because of the two central performances. Chalamet and Hammer are absolutely superb. At the beginning I thought the plot could potentially irritate me, and its easy for films tackling subjects like this to come across as insincere, but through the two performances it was very believable and affecting, I completely bought their two characters. The intentions and thoughts of both of them did not need to be expressed through dialogue, but through their physicality and interactions, their thoughts, desires and concerns could be implicitly expressed.

I felt about an hour in the film started to meander and the director was not sure what direction to talk it. That's the difficulty with something so sensual, when you start to introduce more plot it can be difficult to know where to go. I didn't think the direction was overly interesting, there was nothing new or innovative to elevate the content, it was more like usual smart-modern stylistic art affair with flashy colours and pop music.

Araby (João Dumans and Affonso Uchoa, 2017)


Wonderful Brazilian film that my friend had kept recommending me. A look into working class Brazil, with a look into the life of Cristiano - a man with ups and downs, with love and loss. It was very reminiscent of Bresson in its use of light to create wonderful images, in its muted naturalistic performances and its heightened use of diegetic sound.

Ad Astra (James Gray, 2019) [Cinema]


I have heard great things about James Gray from a number of people online whose opinions I really respect on film, but I had not seen a film from him before this. Someone told me that he was one of few modern directors to understand "film spatiality" so I was curious as to how what approach this artistic director would bring to a mainstream marketed film.

Wow was I blown away. What a film. It might sound like hyperbole but I really do think this is one of the most beautiful films that I have ever seen. Every frame and scene is gorgeous, the use of space, colour, the editing, everything is perfect. There is nothing about the composition of the shots that I would change. Amazing to see such a considered film get a big budget and backing. I really was in awe throughout the whole film, I felt like I was watching it with my jaw wide open throughout. There are just so many stunning sequences but even the little scenes and moments are just perfect.

I've written a full review of the film here - https://screen-hopping.co.uk/film-reviews/ad-astra/

Now I want to see more films from Gray!
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The Phantom of the Opera (1925)

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This was not one of my favorites as a child. I thought I would like it more now and I did, but I still didn't get totally into it. There are things I love about it; the set pieces, atmosphere, makeup. I don't have any complaints and I'm not sure why I'm not a bigger fan.