Ingmar Bergman

Tools    





^I have seen the TV version of Fanny and Alexander, I think it's even better than the theatrical cut. Which seems to be what people say about Scenes From a Marriage as well.
__________________
"Puns are the highest form of literature." -Alfred Hitchcock



Please Quote/Tag Or I'll Miss Your Responses
The Seventh Seal
Wild Strawberries
Persona
Autumn Sonata
Scenes From A Marriage
Summer with Monika
Brink of Life
From The Life of the Marionettes
Smiles From A Summer Night
Cries and Whispers
The Virgin Spring
Through a Glass Darkly

I couldn't finish "The Silence" or "Fanny and Alexander"

I'm looking for conversational stuff. I don't need to see "beautiful" movies - I want some decent pace... Based on my rankings, if you can pick a few I'd like, I'll watch them today.



I've still only seen 6 of Bergman's films. This is how I'd probably rank them:

Wild Strawberries (1957)
The Seventh Seal (1957)
The Silence (1963)
Autumn Sonata (1978)
Persona (1966)
Winter Light (1963)

I like all six of them a lot, but the first two films have something beautifully positive about them (while not shying away from very dark spaces as well), which is an element that I miss a little bit in Bergman's later, more purposely depressing work (apart from a few moments).

I might visit some other films of his in the near future, actually. It's long overdue.
__________________
Cobpyth's Movie Log ~ 2019



I've seen:

Cries & Whispers
Persona
Winter Light
Shame
Hour of the Wolf
Through a Glass Darkly
Brink of Life
Wild Strawberries
The Seventh Seal
Smiles of a Summer Night
The Virgin Spring



I liked all of them to varying degrees, with Persona, Wild Strawberries, and Smiles of a Summer Night probably being my top three.



Care for some gopher?
I've seen seven of his films, so far:

Autumn Sonata -

Brink of Life -

The Seventh Seal -

Scenes of a Marriage -
+
The Silence -
+
The Virgin Spring -
+
Wild Strawberries -
__________________
"Gentlemen, you can't fight in here. This is the war room."



Stealing my name, are you HitchFan97?

Joke aside, Ingmar Bergman was a great visionary director! Some people here says Swedes never make great movies, but Bergman if anyone is proof of the contrary.

Persona for example is a film made by him that I consider a masterpiece.



Stealing my name, are you HitchFan97?
There's a guy here with a closer name: HItchcockian. Surely you came across him when registering and that's why you added 97? haha.

Anyway i've still only seen four Bergmans. Really shameful, he's probably the most loved foreign director on this site but i just haven't jumped into his films yet. Ranked:

01.Wild Strawberries (the only one i love so far)
02.The Seventh Seal
03.The Virgin Spring
Persona - Not ranked because i don't remember it that well outside of the opening and a few things later on.



The Seventh Seal (1957)



Bergman's most pessimistic and overrated film, in my opinion. It has some striking and rightfully iconic imagery, but to me, this is the archetypal doom-and-gloom arthouse flick concerned with existential angst and contemplation. That being said, Bergman is the master of these themes; he just dealt with them much better in later films. In retrospect, The Seventh Seal comes across to me as a wounded cry from an artist who was, at the time, tortured by the silence of God in what he saw as an empty world. Not exactly cheerful topics, but Bergman would continue to refine them in his Faith Trilogy before reaching the pinnacle of his religious themes in Cries and Whispers (a movie which says infinitely more about God and death). This one, then, is merely interesting as an early and slightly banal exploration of the ideas that would preoccupy Bergman for much of his career.





This is actually the last film I watched, until its half. It was very intriguing, but is even death supposed to be a joke? I mean like, he appears at the begining for 1 minute, and then disappears for half an hour, cheats him at the church (which I thought was very clever, and I expected something like that from Ingmar (because priests wear dark robes,and maybe he mocks or questiones that too - why the representatives of light should be in black?)), but then disappears again...while in the meantime some sort of group of travelling actors just fools around.

I don't know any another film that makes fun of everything it seriously considers while considering it still.
So, is that the whole point? Very interesting either way.



Please Quote/Tag Or I'll Miss Your Responses
This is actually the last film I watched, until its half. It was very intriguing, but is even death supposed to be a joke? I mean like, he appears at the begining for 1 minute, and then disappears for half an hour, cheats him at the church (which I thought was very clever, and I expected something like that from Ingmar (because priests wear dark robes,and maybe he mocks or questiones that too - why the representatives of light should be in black?)), but then disappears again...while in the meantime some sort of group of travelling actors just fools around.



So, is that the whole point? Very interesting either way.
Death comes and goes



Diving into Bergman's films for the first time. Where should i start?



Diving into Bergman's films for the first time. Where should i start?
The Seventh Seal
Wild Strawberries
Persona
Watched Persona yesterday. Gonna watch Wild Strawberries today.