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@Citizen Rules to the rescue I don't know why I can't seem to find the links to films on those wacky sites, but fortunately, some people can (and share). In other words, I did manage to watch The Other, and if everyone is OK with it, I'd change my choice to that. I'm sure pretty much everyone here knows that I prefer horror over comedy.

The Other (1972)

First of all, the copy I watched was of great quality, but the audio in the film isn't the clearest, and without subs, I had difficulties in catching some of the dialogue. Nothing that really hurts the experience, but still perhaps missing some of the finer details.

Perhaps I've seen enough too many horror films, but the twist was obvious from the beginning. Because of that, the first hour or so drags a little at times. Maybe it was a more novel thing in 1972. The film builds (and builds) quite well towards the revelation, and unlike The Opposite of Sex, it doesn't dive in the end; pretty much the opposite, actually, as the bleak ending doesn't pull punches.

The Other is a surprisingly fitting match for me, considering that @John Dumbear is new here and probably doesn't know my taste that well. It's not the best of its kind, but a solid film none the less. I don't know if I'd call it a coming of age film, but it belongs in the same general direction as some of my favorites (like The Reflecting Skin and Poison for the Fairies). It also weirdly reminds me of one of my B-film favorites, The Child (which people here generally hated when I nominated it in B-movie HoF).

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28 days...6 hours...42 minutes...12 seconds
@pahaK just to confirm you are submitting your rating for The Other and not The Opposite of Sex.
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Suspect's Reviews



I watched Black Orpheus last night. I give it
. I think if you know a little more about the story of Orpheus and Eurydice, you'll probably like it even more. I had just some cursory details about it, but the film still worked. Even not knowing all that much about it, you can easily tell you were watching something like a legend or a myth with some Greek inspiration. The setting worked wonders for the film, because it allowed every one to dress like they were in a stage play. The extended dance sequences worked really well, as the actors used their bodies and faces to convey their message well. It helped sell the idea that these two were gravitationally attracted to one another through forces beyond understanding, like predestination. I'd like to really dig into the legend of Orpheus and Eurydice and come back to this and see how much more I enjoy it and how much symbolism I pick up on that I missed the first time.



@jiraffejustin

Black Orpheus (1959)
I liked this one! To me this was a film watching adventure, dripping in exotic locales before they became ruined by mega hotels. Gosh I want to visit Brazil now, but...in the year 1959 and at carnival like shown in this film.

Black Orpheus
was a Palme d'Or winner at Cannes and also won the Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film. I did appreciate the chance to see such a beautifully told and wonderfully filmed re-telling of the ancient Greek mythological love story. The movie works almost like a documentary as it doesn't rely deeply on character building or story telling. Instead it watches the people of the region as they get ready for the much anticipated yearly carnival celebration.

I read that the director ran out of money and literally lived on the beach as he tried to get enough cash to finish the film. And it does seem to be a very personal film, ala indie film. Black Orpheus is like a time capsule to another place, quite magically.



I'm glad to see you liked Black Orpheus JJ, I thought you might and it was my #1 choice for you. Though the other film picks are solid too. Have you seen anything else by the director?



I'm glad to see you liked Black Orpheus JJ, I thought you might and it was my #1 choice for you. Though the other film picks are solid too. Have you seen anything else by the director?
I have not.

I've had Black Orpheus on my watch list for a little while now, but not in a priority spot until you gave it to me.



I have not.

I've had Black Orpheus on my watch list for a little while now, but not in a priority spot until you gave it to me.
I haven't seen anything from the director either. I probably should check out another film of his one of these days. BTW I watched Shoplifters, really liked it too. I'll write something up about it tomorrow.




Shoplifters (2018)

I'm liking this Movie Roulette That's two movie choices for me that I have both really enjoyed watching. I thought Shoplifters would be right up my alley when I first heard about it sometime back. Right from the get go I was hooked and very interested to learn more about these people and their very different type of lifestyle.

I loved the unique world that the movie shows us. I liked the actors and the characters they portrayed too. They were intriguing and seemed like real people and not just mere props in some movie. I don't even know what city they were in, but it doesn't matter as it was like a candid view of a world that one would never see and to me that's cool.

I'm not going to go too analytical on my review here, because all I really need to say is that Shoplifters was a unique story that was told well.



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Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?



Breaker Morant (1980)

"If you encounter any Boers, you really must not loot 'em and if you wish to leave these shores, for pity's sake don't shoot 'em."

Based on a true story, set in South Africa during the Boer War, three Australian officers are tried by British officials for shooting prisoners.
Like many court room dramas we traverse back and forth from the small, dirt-floored, stone hut used for the proceedings to the incidents building up to as well as the various renditions as witness after witness testifies.
Starring Edward Woodward, Jack Thompson and Bryan Brown this tense, very well directed film adheres to both the legend and to the historical facts of a trial that may very well have been pre-arranged, while addressing an officer who, though was following verbally officiated orders, may have acted on a more personal vendetta.

This was an excellent nomination by @Allaby that I very much enjoyed. The pacing, the cinematography, an especially the acting was very spot on and I am so glad I got to see this film. Even more so at a more older age than the high schooler who's curiosity was whetted but never sated when this film first came out.

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What to do if you find yourself stuck with no hope of rescue:
Consider yourself lucky that life has been good to you so far. Alternatively, if life hasn't been good to you so far, which given your present circumstances seems more likely, consider yourself lucky that it won't be troubling you much longer.



Allaby's Avatar
Guy who likes movies



Breaker Morant (1980)

"If you encounter any Boers, you really must not loot 'em and if you wish to leave these shores, for pity's sake don't shoot 'em."

Based on a true story, set in South Africa during the Boer War, three Australian officers are tried by British officials for shooting prisoners.
Like many court room dramas we traverse back and forth from the small, dirt-floored, stone hut used for the proceedings to the incidents building up to as well as the various renditions as witness after witness testifies.
Starring Edward Woodward, Jack Thompson and Bryan Brown this tense, very well directed film adheres to both the legend and to the historical facts of a trial that may very well have been pre-arranged, while addressing an officer who, though was following verbally officiated orders, may have acted on a more personal vendetta.

This was an excellent nomination by @Allaby that I very much enjoyed. The pacing, the cinematography, an especially the acting was very spot on and I am so glad I got to see this film. Even more so at a more older age than the high schooler who's curiosity was whetted but never sated when this film first came out.

Glad you liked it!



28 days...6 hours...42 minutes...12 seconds
Round 3


@pahaK
@cricket
------------------------
@Citizen Rules
@Allaby
------------------------
@edarsenal
@jiraffejustin
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@TheUsualSuspect
@John Dumbear
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*standings updated on the first pge.


I will have my rating and review of The Elephant Man up Monday night, but I thought we'd get a headstart on nominating movies for the next round.



@Citizen Rules
@Allaby

Hey Allaby I see you're new to MoFo, glad to have ya here! Is there any type of movies you dislike? I want to pick some good ones for you

Me, I strongly dislike graphic violence, I don't like modern horrors. I do like old stuff, old Hollywood stuff or old classic foreign stuff.



@cricket

It'll take a while to figure what to nominate for you. You've seen so much. I know what I'd like to nominate, but sadly it's impossible (for various reasons). I'll try to come up with something either today or tomorrow.



@cricket

OK, let's see if you've seen all of these.

Who Can Kill a Child? (1976) - a Spanish horror somewhat resembling early Romero's
The Slayer (1982) - another horror, but this doesn't have any illusions of grandeur. Sort of a forgotten gem
Rush (1991) - undercover narcotic cops



Let's see if I can give you something good @edarsenal

Choice one: Pather Panchali (1955) by Satyajit Ray because I saw that you didn't have it checked off in your lists and because I think it is a
film

Choice two: Obsession (1976) by Brian de Palma because I just watched it and I enjoyed it a lot. It's over the top at times, it completely apes Hitchcock and Vertigo, but it's a fun piece of filmmaking that felt fresh to my modern eyes.

Choice three: I, Tonya (2017) by Craig Gillespie because it is a bold movie that takes an historic moment in time and delivers it to you from a perspective you might not have considered when it happened, plus it's pretty funny



cricket's Avatar
Registered User
@cricket

OK, let's see if you've seen all of these.

Who Can Kill a Child? (1976) - a Spanish horror somewhat resembling early Romero's
The Slayer (1982) - another horror, but this doesn't have any illusions of grandeur. Sort of a forgotten gem
Rush (1991) - undercover narcotic cops
I know Who Can Kill a Child? is popular but it bored the hell out of me.

I saw Rush a long time ago and didn't care for it. It's a movie I've been interested in seeing again because my taste is so different now, but I have seen it.

That leaves The Slayer and it looks like a fine choice!


For you-

Boys Don't Cry (1999)
Top 10 favorite material for me and based on a true story. On the directed by women list.



Allaby's Avatar
Guy who likes movies
@Citizen Rules
@Allaby

Hey Allaby I see you're new to MoFo, glad to have ya here! Is there any type of movies you dislike? I want to pick some good ones for you

Me, I strongly dislike graphic violence, I don't like modern horrors. I do like old stuff, old Hollywood stuff or old classic foreign stuff.
Hi Citizen Rules! I don't have any types of movies I dislike. I'm willing to give almost anything a shot. I like classics and new films, independent and big budget blockbusters, films from all over the world. I enjoy a good comedy, a fun action movie, a well made drama, a thrilling horror, or an entertaining musical that makes me want to sing and dance. I don't mind kids or family movies. I can appreciate an entertaining cult or B movie. Just follow your heart your when recommending to me and I will be cool with that. I will have recs for you shortly.



Allaby's Avatar
Guy who likes movies
@Citizen Rules

My recommendations for you:

The Naked Island (1960) Beautiful and moving Japanese film with no dialogue about the life of a family.
The Marrying Kind (1952) Directed by George Cukor, this comedy/drama is about a married couple on the verge of a divorce.
Sullivan's Travels (1941) Directed by Preston Sturges, this delightful comedy is about a Hollywood director who wants to experience life as a homeless person to gain experience for his next movie.

All 3 are on my list of all time favourites and all 3 I rate a 10/10.