Directors Who Disliked Their Own Movie/s

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You mean me? Kei's cousin?
Didn't Tony Kaye want his name taken off American History X? I can't remember the details (or be bothered to look them up) but I remember it became a big thing.
He was definitely pissed because Ed Norton made changes.



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John Cassavetes didn't want his name on "Big Trouble", which I've read was a favor from Peter Falk to John's family, since he was dying.. It's an awful movie, and I've never heard of a Cassavetes even mention the movie while rating his filmography.



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Brandon DiCamillio
He for some reason regrets doing the CKY videos (co-directed and wrote most of them). He shunned himself after either Minghags or Hotdog Casserole. He was probably my favourite on Viva La Bam, he was hilarious. Glad he started a family though. Did get a comment back once on his YT channel, kinda happy about that.
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Kubrick didn't like "Fear and Desire"
He didn't like The Shining either. He said it was a failed experiment.



Woody Allen apparently disliked Manhattan. He reportedly said "I just thought to myself, 'At this point in my life, if this is the best I can do, they shouldn't give me money to make movies'." This is surprising considering it's one of his best. I wish I knew more about why he thought this.
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Woody Allen apparently disliked Manhattan. He reportedly said "I just thought to myself, 'At this point in my life, if this is the best I can do, they shouldn't give me money to make movies'." This is surprising considering it's one of his best. I wish I knew more about why he thought this.

Maybe it's because it's very much like Annie Hall? Even the same Woody-Diane teaming. I also liked it very much, not as much as "Annie Hall" and the only movies I liked of his, although "Interiors" is alright for a Bergman-tribute, and "Zelig" had some funny moments. The 60s comedy stuff might have had a decent line here or there, "Play it Again, Sam" had a unique thing going with Bogart, but the movie didn't move me, or "Everything You Wanted ....".. I saw a few more.





Steven Soderbergh has publicly denounced his own film The Underneath (1995). It was his fourth film. His debut Sex, Lies, and Videotape had been a surprise indie smash, a winner at Sundance and Cannes, it garnered Golden Globe and Oscar nominations and made the 26-year-old writer/director an star overnight. His followup, Kafka, was a bigger budget stylistic experiment that split critics and his third film, King of the Hill, was beloved critically but failed to make a box office or awards impact. Enter The Underneath.

The Underneath is a remake of a classic Film Noir, Criss Cross (1949). Directed by Robert Siodmak starring Burt Lancaster, Yvonne De Carlo, and Dan Duryea it involves a man's ex-wife and her thug boyfriend convincing him to be part of an armored car robbery. The remake has the same basic plot and characters with Peter Gallagher, Alison Elliott, and William Fichtner taking the leads and a supporting cast that includes Joe Don Baker, Paul Dooley, and Elisabeth Shue. I rather like The Underneath. As a huge fan of both the original movie the genre I thought Soderbergh's modern take on the material was stylishly cool with some very good performances - especially as the first major role for Fichtner, who I have been a fan of ever since - while retaining the strengths of the original.



The critics pretty roundly hated it, finding it too emotionally withdrawn and an exercise in style rather than vibrant storytelling, and it found no box office support at all. The in-your-face stylistic choices included heavy colored filters for several segments throughout. It is a visual technique Soderbergh would return to again in later films, including most evidently in Traffic. But apparently Soderbergh himself agrees with the critical consensus on this one. And he blames nobody but himself. He was burned out and found himself going through the motions rather than enthusiastic about his process and the material. He hated the experience of filming and finishing the film so much that for his next project he went back to his extremely low budget roots to make Schizopolis, which reenergized him creatively.

The next video is Soderbergh in no uncertain terms detailing how much he doesn't like The Underneath ("It's just totally sleepy"). This self-critical video as well as the entire film itself was included as a supplement to The Criterion Collection release of King of the Hill.



After the micro-budgeted Schizopolois and the filmed Spalding Gray monologue Gray's Anatomy Soderbergh returned to studio and genre filmmaking in a big way with Out of Sight and The Limey which led into his Oscar year triumphs of Traffic and Erin Brockovich. For Soderbergh The Underneath was a necessary bottoming out that he rebounded from. I still like the movie but his frankness in his struggles and mindset are unusual and refreshing.


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David Lynch's Dune, he wasn't happy with creative control but I know a lot of people who regard this as a good movie.

I don't think Hitchcock was very happy with Rope but lots of people love it now.

Wow, really? I LOVED Rope



Woody Allen apparently disliked Manhattan. He reportedly said "I just thought to myself, 'At this point in my life, if this is the best I can do, they shouldn't give me money to make movies'." This is surprising considering it's one of his best. I wish I knew more about why he thought this.

I think it's one of his best too...I liked it way better than Annie Hall



Happens a lot with debut films... Like someone else mentioned, Fincher and Alien3, or Kubrick and Fear and Desire. James Cameron isn't very fond of Piranha II either, but then again, he wasn't supposed to direct it. He stepped in after the director was fired.
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"Honor is not in the Weapon. It is in the Man"
Hong Kong director Andrew Lau, hot off the heels of his Infernal Affairs trilogy (the saga that inspired Martin Scorsese's The Departed), was approached to make his Hollywood debut on The Flock, which starred Richard Gere and Claire Danes. Lau disowned the film after producers constantly interfered with the post-production.



Michael Biehn experienced something similar when he was approached by a producer to make his directorial debut on a indie Hong Kong-based martial arts action film called The Blood Bond, which he also co-starred. Biehn disowned the film after the producer constantly interfered and thus, Biehn considers his horror film The Victim his "real" directorial debut. The Blood Bond would be re-titled Shadowguard and it was a complete bomb upon release.

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Happens a lot with debut films... Like someone else mentioned, Fincher and Alien3, or Kubrick and Fear and Desire. James Cameron isn't very fond of Piranha II either, but then again, he wasn't supposed to direct it. He stepped in after the director was fired.
^^ this



"Honor is not in the Weapon. It is in the Man"
Wes Craven had nothing but disdain for The Hills Have Eyes Part II (1984).I mean the film where a dog gets flashbacks of the first film?! Production had ceased part way through due to money running out.



David Lynch is remembering with sadness about his film from 1984 Dune, a movie which almost ruined him. He was the first director who brought Frank Herbert’s science-fiction book to the big screen with his 1984 film.
I remember I did read the Dune saga and watching later the film it wasn't exactly as I imagined it.
Lynch says he didn't had final cut on that film.
He had to cut some of the greatest scenes from his script because producers refused to give him the money to film them.
So, having less money in the end he was forced to work with less therefore the visual effects were poorer and the production started to look like a cheap one.
Now Denis Villeneuve is preparing Dune 2021 - which I believe will have a greater success, because he is a skilled director, but I believe David Lynch made a much better choice for the role of Paul Atreides (Muad'Dib) by choosing Kyle MacLachlan than Denis Villeneuve choosing Timothée Chalamet who looks a bit too childish for the role imo.
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I don't think Hitchcock was very happy with Rope but lots of people love it now.
That's true. He regarded it as a "stunt" movie. He also didn't like Under Capricorn. He said that he was so dazzled with Ingrid Bergman that he, in effect, let the movie go to hell.



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Ha.. I've seen a lot of rare, old, foreign movies, ones with under 100 IMDB votes, but I have no desire for Spielberg, Lucas... I might wanna watch the movie, "Alien" though, but the title puts me off a little.
Alien is a masterpiece of tension and suspense. You do want to watch it.



Maybe it's because it's very much like Annie Hall? Even the same Woody-Diane teaming. I also liked it very much, not as much as "Annie Hall" and the only movies I liked of his, although "Interiors" is alright for a Bergman-tribute, and "Zelig" had some funny moments. The 60s comedy stuff might have had a decent line here or there, "Play it Again, Sam" had a unique thing going with Bogart, but the movie didn't move me, or "Everything You Wanted ....".. I saw a few more.

I liked Manhattan way more than Annie Hall



[Manhattan] I think it's one of his best too...I liked it way better than Annie Hall
I do too. Manhattan is more epic like. "Hall" pretty much started a women's clothes fashion.

Seems to me Allen said that he never watches his films after he is finished with their productions. He never stops writing.