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Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb


5.



Dr. Strangelove: Or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb: 1964 (PG) + 5
USA / Columbia Pictures
100% (CF)



Stanley Kubrick is a very special filmmaker for me. For the majority of my life movies were just mediums for telling stories. Then I took that film class I took in college, where I was helped along by being shown a different way of looking at movies. I learned symbolism, themes, and a new visual language opened up for me. And one of the most significant films to be shown in that class was this one, the film I credit as being the movie that really got the ball rolling in my cinematic maturation. From the phallic imagery of the opening scenes, the beautiful camera shots, the perfect musical accompaniment, the razor sharp satire, to the cold but hilarious tone of the film; no one filmmaker helped me grow as a film watcher more than Kubrick. Though his masterful work I was propelled from being just a fan of movies to a true connoisseur of the cinema.

Now I did not fall in love with this film at first. It took a while and many rewatches for me to gain my current love and appreciation for the film. But like any great movie, there was something fascinating about this movie I really enjoyed, and that enjoyment kept me coming back to this movie. And as my cinematic maturation progressed paired with the many rewatches, I have learned to really love and appreciate the very dark humor and satire of this film. Many people say you are not supposed to laugh at Dr Strangelove, but I disagree, this movie is funny as hell! While Clerks II is my favorite comedy and makes me laugh more, I love this movie more as an overall film. Understandable since Kubrick is a master at his craft. What makes this film even more incredible is its rich behind the scene stories and its very creation given the global affairs at the time of production. If you would like to know more about this film from the mad genius of the cinema, here was my review of Dr Strangelove from my last Top 50.

See Review here