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Mr Minio's Top 185 Films aka I bet you haven't seen it!

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12 Angry Men and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest are good films, not seen the others
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Finally found a movie I didn't like on your list: Shutter Island. Scorsese is the favorite director of me and my wife. We both sat their stunned at how lame this movie was. We kept waiting for something to happen, and nothing ever did.



I haven't seen much of anything,but Spirited Away and 21 Grams are both insanely good. And of course, cuckoos nest.



Tokyo Story and Spirited Away are weaker than Departures? Well, every man to his taste.

I also agree that Shutter Island is among Scorsese's best movies (in fact, it's better than Goodfellas and Ranging Bull IMO).



Tokyo Story and Spirited Away are weaker than Departures? Well, every man to his taste.

I also agree that Shutter Island is among Scorsese's best movies (in fact, it's better than Goodfellas and Ranging Bull IMO).
Well, every man to his taste
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Setsuko Hara is my co-pilot
80. The World of Apu


The whole trilogy is a great achievement of Indian cinema and one of the initiators of parallel cinema. I found the final part the most powerful and humane, but it's not significantly worse than the first. The second one is the weakiest, but it's still a great movie. Godlike trilogy.

79. Donnie Darko


"-Why are you wearing that stupid bunny suit?
-Why are you wearing that stupid man suit?"

78. The Seventh Continent


Hands down the gloomiest, saddest, most depressing Haneke film based on real events.

77. Chariots of Fire


How should I react to this movie: It's so soppy and melodramatic, it's obvious he will do it.
How do I actually react to it: You gotta be first! Pursuit your dreams, man! You can do it! Faster!!! OMG so epic slowmo.

76. Siberia, Monamour


Soviet cinema has always been along the best in the world and it didn't change after the fall of USSR, nor later, in 2011 when this pearl of a film was released. It's hard to believe it's a debut as it's very mature, beautifully-looking and raw in its themes.

75. Intolerance: Love's Struggle Throughout the Ages


An epic that changed the way films are made. Being the first masterpiece in history, it portrays >>intolerance<< and love in different times, introducing new ways of filmmaking.

74. Madeo


I can't understand why it's not as known and praised as Memories of Murder, being a lot weaker film in my opinion.

73. Ballad of a Soldier


Moving story of Soviet soldier heading back home after he got a short permit.

72. Obchod na korze


This (Czecho)Slovak film is probably the best portrayal of Holocaust I've ever seen. It's not violent nor pompous and sometimes it even includes some comedy touches. The ending is very tragic, though. A must-see.

71. Ćma


One of my favourite Polish films, in which a man tries to help others through night radio audition, but also struggles through his own problems.
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Chariots of Fire was the most boring movie going experience of my life; but I was a kid so I don't think it means much.

I want to see Donnie Darko again as it was just ok for me the first time.



I'd encourage you to check out Chariots Of Fire, Daniel/cricket. It's a good film and, I think, told in a way which completely absorbs you. I don't find it particularly cinematic, so I'm surprised it's on Mr. Mino's list.
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I'd encourage you to check out Chariots Of Fire, Daniel/cricket. It's a good film and, I think, told in a way which completely absorbs you. I don't find it particularly cinematic, so I'm surprised it's on Mr. Mino's list.
Yeh I have been told it's one of those British films you should watch, but never really seen the chance to.

Also Mr Minio, I think Film4 (British film channel) are showing the Apu trilogy this week, because I set Pather Panchali to record and it gave me the option to 'Series Link' it, which I assume means they'll have the other two parts too.



Setsuko Hara is my co-pilot
70. Grand Illusion


The only Renoir film I have seen so far, but it became my instant favourite, so I'm looking forward to his other works.

69. My Night at Maud's


I like how the first part involving an intellectual conversation is followed by the second more down-to-earth part, so the viewer can learn both about philosophy and tea ceremony.

68. Pora Umierać


A part of my old review, because I'm too lazy to write something about it again:
There's no doubt that Pora umierać is a drama, but the beginning suggests something else. There is a short scene during which the old woman visits the doctor. She hesitantly asks if she may enter and gets an impolite answer. The doctor seems to treat her patients more like the objects than actual human beings. However, the woman doesn't remain indifferent and ripostes. Her sharp yet intelligent answer perfectly describes her character. Later, during the movie, the viewer observes her daily routines as well as relations with her son and granddaughter. The plot involves and the viewer enters the world of senility, which is, in spite of all, really beautiful.
67. The Terrorizers


I have no idea why I still haven't seen the rest of Yang filmography, but this film alone just proves he's a genius.

66. Burmese Harp


It's very human and touching and I guess this is enough to make somebody watch it. I believe I've watched it before any Kurosawa and only Rashomon reached the level of humanism this work presents.

65. A Page of Madness


A couple of reasons why I love it:
- it's old
- it's surreal
- it's foreign
- it's obscure
- most of you haven't seen it
- it's awesome (the only unreal reason hehe)

64. Rashomon


Although Kurosawa is not my favourite Japanese director and Mifune is not my favourite Japanese actor I just can't do anything than admiring this great piece of work.

63. The Call of Cthulhu


As Lovecraftian I truly love this 2005 expressionist silent masterfully conveying the filthy mood of Lovecraft stories.

62. Three Colours: Red


It's one of those rare trilogies, in which the next part is better than the previous. The last one, Red, is nothing less than a masterpiece and my favourite Kieślowski film.

61. Vivre Sa Vie


My favourite Godard film so far. His wife was so adorable and attractive. By the way, if you know what movie is Anna Karina watching here, you're cool. This film is going to be pretty high on this list.



Seen Rashomon and thought it was good. Those I have heard of there I want to see, the Three Colours series I want to see, and Vivre Sa Vie, well Godard films in general as I love the first two films of his that I have seen.



Donnie Darko is a really good film, but I am beginning to wonder why people like it so much Not seen any of the others there.
Again, ^.

From that last set, I absolutely love My Night at Maud's and The Terrorizers, which will definitely be on my 80s list. Rashomon and Vivre sa Vie are nice picks too, Anna Karina was never better and I do know what movie she's watching, so I guess that makes me cool



Seen Rashomon and thought it was good. Those I have heard of there I want to see, the Three Colours series I want to see, and Vivre Sa Vie, well Godard films in general as I love the first two films of his that I have seen.
Rashomon is very good but I think that some of Kurosawa's other films were even better. Rashomon appears to be Ms. Minio's favorite Kurosawa film (assuming he watched others).



Setsuko Hara is my co-pilot
I ain't no female, if only kinda womanish.

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60. Obrazy starťho sveta


Another documentary. This time it's showing elders in Slovakia's villages. Their lives, problems and dreams.

59. Stellet Licht


As always in Reygadas film this is a story involving faith, religion and love. This is so far my favourite movie of this Mexican director, in which he tells a story of Mexican Mennonite family.

58. M


Metropolis was cool, but this is Lang's masterpiece. A crime film that changed the genre. The last scenes of enraged mob are something to remember.

57. Repulsion


I had a hard time picking my favourite Polański movie, because I've seen The Pianist at least four times and only seen Repulsion once, but I eventually picked the latter, since I still remember its schizophrenic mood and claustrophobic flat the most important scenes take place in.

56. Oslo, 31. august


My favourite drug addiction movie. It's heavy and filled with depression. My favourite scene has to be the one in the end, in which the protagonist plays Hšndel's Suite in D Minor.

55. The Dream of a Ridiculous Man


One of the most powerful shorts I've ever seen, based on Dostoyevski's short story, looks like moving paintings. It's filled with Biblical symbolism and plain human goodness.

54. Tale of Tales


Leave the symbolism, history, visuals and music. This cute wolf alone deserves the place!

53. The Willow Tree


God fulfills our dreams, grants us what we want, but instead of being thankful we use the gift to do bad things. We do not thank Him, only think the thing we just got always belonged to us. In our conceit we loose our minds, not being able to use the granted thing properly. We blame God and no longer want His gift, but when we loose it, we still are unhappy as we would be if he didn't give us anything. But it's not the end, because there's always hope.

52. Dolls


We walk through life finding love, feeling guilt, trying to embrace ourself, change something, not being able to foreseen how long our live will last, constantly travelling through life and seasons. Bad feelings such as envy and good feelings such as love shape our personality, but ultimately we all die. It's the only thing we can't change.

51. El Topo


Are we shapers of our fate? Do we become immortal by killing undying? Can we attain purification through meditation? Can we receive redemption no matter what we did? Is a human being able to redeem the sins by doing good deeds?



I watched El Topo the other day and absolutely loved it, Tale of Tales I love and I like The Dream of a Ridiculous Man too, I watched both as you nominated them in the short films tournament. M and Repulsion have always been pretty high up on my watchlist.