MoFo Movie Roulette

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Choice one: Choice three: Shoplifters (2018) by Hirokazu Koreeda because you said it looked good

Choice two: War and Peace (1965) by Sergey Bondarchuk because I think it's a fantastic piece of filmmaking, maybe the single greatest achievement in the history of film. The major downside is that it is very long, so I don't expect it to be your choice for a game like this. But if you can ever dedicate the time to see it, I strongly recommend it. I think there is a shorter version, you can watch that if you want, but the super long version is the best.

Choice three: Alexander Nevsky (1938) by Sergei Eisenstein because it's a cool, rousing film that's important to film history. Pretty sure it's widely available online and on Youtube with subs.
Those selections are well chosen and worthy of any cinephile. I'm not quite up to cinephile level yet, I'm more like a cinephile-jr.

I almost went with War and Peace. But I just don't think I can watch it all in one week with work and all, but cool choice. So as much as I'm intrigued by the two Russian selections I'll go with the populist choice Shoplifters.



cricket's Avatar
Registered User
Versus (2000)
Memories of a Murder
The Guilty
I Saw the Devil
I love I Saw the Devil and also thought highly of Memories of Murder. I already have The Guilty on my watchlist (maybe because of you?) so I'll watch that one.



@jiraffejustin

Here's my choices for you, I hope there's something of interest. I know you have diverse movie taste, so I tried not to go with my usual Doris Day films

Black Orpheus
(1959) A vivid re-telling of the ancient Greek mythological love story set in Brazil during Carnival. A very personal film from an under known director Marcel Camus.

Broken Blossoms
(1919) D.W. Griffith's self redemption film after his notorious Birth of a Nation. In Broken Blossoms he embraces interracial tolerance and even offers a positive view of Buddhism and the Chinese culture. Told in fable form. I found the emotions stirring.

Night Moves (2013) From Kelly Reichardt, an indie film done in Reichardt's slow introspective style. There's a thin line between luck and self ruin. Take one wrong step that seems justified at the time and a chain events can unravel one's life.



I'm only 19, but my mind is old
@jiraffejustin

Here's my choices for you, I hope there's something of interest. I know you have diverse movie taste, so I tried not to go with my usual Doris Day films

Black Orpheus
(1959) A vivid re-telling of the ancient Greek mythological love story set in Brazil during Carnival. A very personal film from an under known director Marcel Camus.

Broken Blossoms
(1919) D.W. Griffith's self redemption film after his notorious Birth of a Nation. In Broken Blossoms he embraces interracial tolerance and even offers a positive view of Buddhism and the Chinese culture. Told in fable form. I found the emotions stirring.

Night Moves (2013) From Kelly Reichardt, an indie film done in Reichardt's slow introspective style. There's a thin line between luck and self ruin. Take one wrong step that seems justified at the time and a chain events can unravel one's life.

I'm a big fan of Reichardt's Meek's Cutoff and someday I know I will finally see one of D.W. Griffith's features, but I'm gonna go with Black Orpheus.



I'm a big fan of Reichardt's Meek's Cutoff and someday I know I will finally see one of D.W. Griffith's features, but I'm gonna go with Black Orpheus.
I love Meek's Cutoff too, Zotis is it's biggest fan. We're in a western HoF together and Meek's Cutoff was my nom...It got mixed reviews and didn't fair well, but at least me and Zotis liked it.



The trick is not minding
I love Meek's Cutoff too, Zotis is it's biggest fan. We're in a western HoF together and Meek's Cutoff was my nom...It got mixed reviews and didn't fair well, but at least me and Zotis liked it.
I remember that. I liked it well enough, didnít love it though. I feel like itís a film that I need to see again to get the full effect.



I remember that. I liked it well enough, didnít love it though. I feel like itís a film that I need to see again to get the full effect.
I needed this too. Liked it the first time & liked it better the second time. Big fan of this director. My fave movie from her so far is Certain Women, which I love.
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Iím here only on Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays. Thatís why Iím here now.



I remember that. I liked it well enough, didnít love it though. I feel like itís a film that I need to see again to get the full effect.
The one thing that will kill Meek's Cutoff for some is poor sound quality. At least for me much of the dialogue was undiscernible, so subs was necessary for me to catch much of the dialogue's nuances. Either subs or a better TV sound system



The one thing that will kill Meek's Cutoff for some is poor sound quality. At least for me much of the dialogue was undiscernible, so subs was necessary for me to catch much of the dialogue's nuances. Either subs or a better TV sound system
I wonít watch anything without subtitles. Everyone mumbles!



I wonít watch anything without subtitles. Everyone mumbles!
That's true. At least in newer movies it seems to be true. Now older stuff...I'm talking mid 20th century, they knew how to pronunciate and project.

Though I do wonder if a better sound system would 'up' the audio track in new movies.



Though I do wonder if a better sound system would 'up' the audio track in new movies.
My hearing is acute. (I can hear a feather hit the floor.) I can hear the dialog, but have no clue what theyíre saying unless I read it too.



@John Dumbear

These are sort of blind picks (you're newish in here, and most of the films in your Letterboxd aren't rated). I did skim your post history a bit, though, so hopefully, you'll find something interesting.

Let the Right One In (2008) - you said you're not a horror fan, but this is more like a drama with some supernatural/horror elements. Sort of based on your post about your favorite child actor performances as well. If you choose this, I strongly recommend Swedish audio + subtitles - I've accidentally started it once with English dubbing, and it was horrible.

The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane (1976) - another one with strong child performance. It's odd how this one's so often dismissed when speaking about Jodie Foster as it's my favorite of hers. Definitely not horror even though it's weirdly labeled as such at times.

Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975) - Peter Weir's dreamlike mystery film. All about the atmosphere.

Seen "Picnic at Hanging Rock", enjoyed it but it has been years. That leaves a horror film...hmmm. "The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane" , I have to pay for. I'm notoriously cheap and will go with "Let the Right One In" that is airing on XUMO for free.Give me a day or two please.


Looking at your profile and selecting ones you may enjoy.



"The Other" ('72 - Mulligan) - one of my favorite of the horror genre. It scarred me as a young teen.


"The Opposite of Sex" ('97 - Roos) - I love dark comedy and this is one of my faves. Basically, the writing.


"2 Days in the Valley" ('96 - Herzfeld) - Another I like that many said was a K-Mart version of "Pulp Fiction" or "True Romance". I disagree.



"The Other" ('72 - Mulligan) - one of my favorite of the horror genre. It scarred me as a young teen.


"The Opposite of Sex" ('97 - Roos) - I love dark comedy and this is one of my faves. Basically, the writing.
These two look more interesting. I'll need to check if I can find either of them (in other words, if anyone has links for proper copies, my inbox is ready) before deciding.
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Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
@edarsenal

My recommendations for you are:
1. My Dinner with Andre (1981) Directed by Louis Malle, the film stars Andre Gregory and Wallace Shawn as two old friends who meet for dinner and have a riveting conversation about their lives and experiences.
2. Breaker Morant (1980) Directed by Bruce Beresford, this drama is about three Australian lieutenants who are court martialed for executing prisoners.
3. Elmer Gantry (1960) Directed by Richard Brooks, this Oscar winning film stars Burt Lancaster and Jean Simmons and is about a fast talking salesman who joins up with an evangelist.

All 3 are on my list of personal favourites and are 10/10s.
I've seen Elmer Gantry and enjoyed it. Dinner with Andre looks appealing but I think I'm going to go with Breaker Morant. I remember hearing about this when it came out so my gut says go with it.

Here's 3 to choose from
The Scarlet Empress (1934)
Klaus (2019)
Lockout (2012)

Went with a wide spectrum that way you can go with your mood.
__________________
- This is one of those films where I liked it on first viewing but I feel like watching it again might actually make me dislike it, but that's pretentious existentialism for you.



These two look more interesting. I'll need to check if I can find either of them (in other words, if anyone has links for proper copies, my inbox is ready) before deciding.

The Opposite of Sex is currently on Amazon Prime and The Other is on FXM. If that helps.



Allaby's Avatar
Guy who likes movies
I've seen Elmer Gantry and enjoyed it. Dinner with Andre looks appealing but I think I'm going to go with Breaker Morant. I remember hearing about this when it came out so my gut says go with it.

Here's 3 to choose from
The Scarlet Empress (1934)
Klaus (2019)
Lockout (2012)

Went with a wide spectrum that way you can go with your mood.
The Scarlet Empress sounds familiar, but I'm not certain if I have seen it or not. I've seen Klaus and was a little underwhelmed by it. I have Lockout on blu-ray as part of a box set, but have never seen it, so I'm going to go with that one.



Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
The Scarlet Empress sounds familiar, but I'm not certain if I have seen it or not. I've seen Klaus and was a little underwhelmed by it. I have Lockout on blu-ray as part of a box set, but have never seen it, so I'm going to go with that one.
It's a fun lil action sci-fi and Guy Pearce plays the sarcastic Anti-Hero seamlessly.
Hope you enjoy it