Best Picture Hall of Fame

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Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?



Mutiny on the Bounty

My favorite rendition of this, though it has been a long time since seeing others; I may need to rewatch them, (1962 with Brando & Trevor Howard and The Bounty from '84 with Gibson and Hopkins) to be completely sure, but this has Charles Laughton and while I am the anomaly regarding his performance and/or him as well, I am very bias since I am a big fan of his. Hell, I even did my very first HoF with a blind grab of one of his movies The Suspect for the first 40's HoF.
I've watched him since I was a wee tot, and much like the Hunchback of Notre Dame, another movie that's been redone again and again, it is his portrayal I enjoy the most. Can't honestly explain it, but I am always entertained when watching him and this is no different from the list of other movies I've seen him in.

I think my only critique, which, if my faulty memory works somewhat, is one for the others as well; it does seem to linger too long in Tahiti, or perhaps that the truly engaging scenes are on the Bounty, so that the tension slips and drags a little when the movie shifts to the island.
Which does pick back up when Bligh is back to collect what "mutinous dogs" he can lay his hands on to "hang from the highest yardarm in the British fleet."

I had forgotten about not seeing what happened to the other men that were captured, but then with the Hayes Code fully in effect at the time of filming, that could easily be the cause of that and instead we get the more vision of better times for the British Navy and the crews that man the ships of said Navy.

But still, a rip roaring sea faring yarn, me laddies.



@edarsenal Glad to hear you enjoyed Mutiny on the Bounty I think you're the only one! Did you see it on DVD? I did and there was a DVD extra from 1935 called Pitcarin Island Today, it's only 9 minutes long but it tells a bit about what happened to the men and shows the viewer the descendants of the Bounty mutineers who still lived on Pitcarin island.

It's on Youtube, this has Spanish subtitles, but better than nothing if you don't have the DVD




Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
@edarsenal Glad to hear you enjoyed Mutiny on the Bounty I think you're the only one! Did you see it on DVD? I did and there was a DVD extra from 1935 called Pitcarin Island Today, it's only 9 minutes long but it tells a bit about what happened to the men and shows the viewer the descendants of the Bounty mutineers who still lived on Pitcarin island.

It's on Youtube, this has Spanish subtitles, but better than nothing if you don't have the DVD

didn't watch it on a DVD so VERY glad to see this -- THANK YOU. Rather enjoyed that, though, at times, the Narrator had a bit of an aloof attitude about the island and those who lived there, but still, pretty cool to see something about the descendants.




One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975)

***Spoilers***

I'm impressed!...This is one of my favorites in this HoF, and there's been a lot of great movies here!

I don't even know where to start with my praises. Cuckoo's Nest has one of the best written scripts I've seen in a movie. So kudos to Lawrence Hauben and Bo Goldman, both who won Oscars for their effort.

And kudos to the actors, the entire cast was uber talented:

Jack Nicholson, OMG was he great in this or what! To his credit he played R.P. McMurphy as a man who might just be a sociopath or might just be a big jack ass. The questionable nature of his character worked wonders as the audience is in the same shoes as the doctors...we don't know if this man really belongs in a mental institute or not?

At first he seems like the typical anti-hero, a role he often played in other movies, but the film then flips that on it's head when he comes with in seconds of choking Nurse Ratchet to death. Which makes me think he's a real sociopath (a person with a personality disorder manifesting itself in extreme antisocial attitudes and behavior and a lack of conscience.)...and that sounds like R.P. McMurphy to me.

When I was younger I thought he was the victim and the nurse was the evil one...but now I can see those roles being blurred and questioned, and that's brilliant screen writing...and acting.



Louise Fletcher
, holy cow she rocked! I had seen this film once like 30 years ago and I remembered her as this evil conniving, sadistic nurse...boy was I wrong! She gave Nurse Ratched depth...and I could see she believed the actions she took was in the best interest of the patients and yet she's a control freak and McMurphy challenges her control which then pushes her deeper into authoritativeness.

Nurse Ratched extruded this passive-aggressive personality that was layered with that overly calm & collected voice, brilliant! But she never really crosses the line and becomes an evil caricature, in fact I rather like her...at least until the end. Both her and Nicholson richly deserved their Oscars.

But you know who I thought was great in this Brad Dourif in his first major movie role. He's always been a favorite actor of mine ever since I seen him in Dune (1984). He was flat out amazing in Star Trek Voyager as a reoccurring character who had become psychotic and murdered a crew member.

The rest of the cast were equally good. I learned in an interview with the director that he hated movies where the supporting actors all looked alike, as the audience can confuse them. So he purposely populated his film with actors that had a very distinctive look. He went with unknown actors at the time, that way he could keep his film feeling more real. The only known actor was Nicholson and he was the audiences proxy into the story, so familiarity was a plus for the lead.

The director had one thing he kept telling the actors over an over, 'keep it natural' and that's why the film works so good, it feels like you're in this mental institute with real patients.



And if all this wasn't enough, they actually filmed and lived for 10 days in a wing of the Oregon Hospital for mental patients. Gosh that makes this film look so authentic as those are real rooms, real sets.

According to the DVD extras the actors really got into their roles and kept in character the entire time. Oh and the head doctor at the beginning of the film, he's a real doctor who worked at Oregon Hospital.

I could think of a few things that didn't work for me, but over all I was blown away by this film.
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106 reviews now! More than over halfway, and closing in on 75%



Save the Texas Prairie Chicken
Kinda made me chuckle that you loved II so much but cared little for the first movie. And yes, that ending IS brilliant.

Oh, and I do believe the answer to that reference would be:

ROBERT DUVALL!!!
Well, I guess this means that you are my new best friend here.
And that second film was great. I could honestly go for it again. But then again, I don't want to watch it anytime soon because I don't want to overdo it. I am afraid it would then lose its appeal for me. So, in a year, perhaps, I will watch it again.



I am not going anywhere all weekend. I said that as soon as I got home tonight that I wasn't leaving the house again until Monday morning. So I will watch The Silence of the Lambs tomorrow afternoon, come online afterwards and give my thoughts and then I will PM my list.




Also, has anyone watched the third Godfather film? What did you think of it? I will finally get around to watching it tomorrow night.
__________________
I became insane, with long intervals of horrible sanity - Edgar Allan Poe





Eh....Mutiny on the Bounty is one of many adaptations of the famous story. The film really lacks focus, spending most of the film building towards the Mutiny and then quickly moved through the post mutiny stories. For me I much prefer the 1962 color version with Marlon Brando and Trevor Howard in that it balances the pre- and post mutiny story.

Judging the film on it's own merits' it's alright. Bligh is portrayed as a cartoonish villain but the implementations of his villainy were well made. Unfortunately only one member of the cast is given enough of a discernible personality.

I'm not really sure if this should have won, I didn't care for John Ford's The Informer which was the other contender that year. But Bride of Frankenstein and Top Hat have both aged very well and they were nominated.




Also, has anyone watched the third Godfather film? What did you think of it? I will finally get around to watching it tomorrow night.
It's very flawed and almost universally agreed upon as the weakest of the three but i like it, there's some good stuff going on. If you get access to the dvd/blu ray make sure to listen to FFC's commentary, it's great.



Nothing good comes from staying with normal people
One flew over the cuckoo's nest(1975)



I don't really know why I find this movie not to my liking. The actors do a good job, the characters are interesting and colorful, but for some reason I can't get into the movie.

Jack Nicholson's character is a likable douche bag, going from a sole point of focus (riding out his time at the asylum) to developing a familial bond with his fellow inmates and even going so far as to help some along (Brad Dourif's best role by far).Not the deepest of personal journeys, but it seems to be enough for the plot and Nicholson makes it work.

And that's just the thing: The story works, so that's not my problem. And neither is the characters.

Billy Bibbit's story line is a dark and sad one, ending with Ratchet fatal scolding. I've allways wondered if there were any actual malice behind her comments. Or, rather, there is malice there of course, she's threatening him with his worst fear, the disaprovement of his mother, but did she do it as a rote gesture, or was it a calculated act of sadism?

It seemed to be an old trick, mentioning his mother as a way to get him to do what she wanted, but this time it seemed to have back-fired. Unless she simply saw it as an opportunity to deal with McMurphy permanently. Sacrifice Billy in order to get rid of a greater threat to the order and her personal power over the psychward, or simply a tragic use of a technique which formerly ensured compliance but now led to a fatal outcome. But that puts us back into the discussion held previously in the stream regarding wether or not Ratchet is the real antagonist of the piece, something I see as a given. Yes, McMurphy puts a functioning ward into disarray, but isn't the wellfare of the patients' spirits as important as keeping their minds and bodies healthy?

No, not the characters either. In truth, it might simply come down to the fact that both times I've sat down to watch this movie, I really wasn't in the mood to watch it, which is a shame, because I'm not sure I'm willing to make a third attempt.

So, to conclude, good actors, good characters, good enough plot, but just not to my liking. Too bad really.
__________________
Why not just kill them? I'll do it! I'll run up to Paris - bam, bam, bam, bam. I'm back before week's end. We spend the treasure. How is this a bad plan?



Nothing good comes from staying with normal people
Forrest Gump(1994)

Forrest Gump has allways felt a bit uneven for me. The beginning was the part I struggles with most, his childhood and the meeting with Jenny felt overly saccarin (until the molesting comes up and we hit a hard left into uncomfortable), following up with his school/collage years that was just a bit boring.

After this point, I got no complaints. What follows is a warm, funny and endearing story that balances the sweet with the more serious and the result is something very special; a feel-good story that manages to be quite frank about everything from sickness, death, loss of identity (hi lieutenant Dan!) and the depression that follows. Above all, my favourite thing/character in this movie is Gary Sinise's role as Lt. Dan (hell no, I'm not going to try to spell Lt. more than once, thank you very much!). Going from a guy with a wierd fascination with family history, getting saved by Forrest and forced into dealing with a life confined in a wheelchair, he seems to be the character who's life is most influenced by being around and away from Forrest (apart from Jenny perhaps). Meeting him saved his life, but put him in a wheelchair. Being on his own, he turns into a depressed, drunk stereotype of the wounded vet, but when Forrest again incounters him, his world takes another turn. Spending time with Forrest seem to bring back something of a fighting spirit, as he makes good on his promise to be the first mate on Forrest's boat and taking on god in the middle of a hurricane (best scene in the movie). I still think he should've gotten that best supporting actor award, though Landau did give a good performance as well.

The final scenes with Jenny and just after had me in tears (as it always does) and cements for me how broad a range Hanks actually posseses. He deserved the best actor oscar in 94 and all the rest since and before.

A feel-good movie, as I said, but with an execution that borders on excellence, resulting in a worthy best picture winner. Had it won if I'd been the deciding vote? Hard to say, but I think I'd gone for Shawshank if I'm honest. But, I'm with okay the outcome.



One flew over the cuckoo's nest(1975)


Billy Bibbit's story line is a dark and sad one, ending with Ratchet fatal scolding. I've allways wondered if there were any actual malice behind her comments. Or, rather, there is malice there of course, she's threatening him with his worst fear, the disaprovement of his mother, but did she do it as a rote gesture, or was it a calculated act of sadism?

It seemed to be an old trick, mentioning his mother as a way to get him to do what she wanted, but this time it seemed to have back-fired. Unless she simply saw it as an opportunity to deal with McMurphy permanently. Sacrifice Billy in order to get rid of a greater threat to the order and her personal power over the psychward, or simply a tragic use of a technique which formerly ensured compliance but now led to a fatal outcome.
Years ago if I was watching a movie with someone and they asked 'why did they do that in the movie?'...I use to jokingly say, 'they did it because it was in the script'.

Which actually helps...so if you forget about Nurse Ratched and McMurphy as 'real' and instead ask yourself why the script writer wrote that scene as he did, that would then give you some insight into why the Nurse threatens Billy with telling his mother.



Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
I was in 5th Grade when this film came out and saw it on TV in the next couple of years and then so many times since then and back then I followed a lot of popular beliefs that Ratchet was the evil one and McMurphy was the the chaotic Fighter for the Underdogs. It was only during this HoF when reading other reviews that I considered looking at their "roles" differently and seeing this movie in a varying light that I had always done and it was rather intriguing to do so. And that was seeing Ratchet as doing her job in the orderly way she sees fit and McMurphy being a trouble maker looking for the easy out in a prison stint only to find something else.
Was Ratchet looking for something more diabolical when threatening Billy? On my previous viewings I would have instantly said yes.
This time around. . . I'm not so sure. It was a tried and true method to achieve obedience that, this time, went utterly south in the worst way. And she looked shocked and then kept it hidden, being the one in control and instantly took measures regarding it, so I don't really think she was looking for that end result.



Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
ROBERT DUVALL!!!
Well, I guess this means that you are my new best friend here.


And that second film was great. I could honestly go for it again. But then again, I don't want to watch it anytime soon because I don't want to overdo it. I am afraid it would then lose its appeal for me. So, in a year, perhaps, I will watch it again.

Also, has anyone watched the third Godfather film? What did you think of it? I will finally get around to watching it tomorrow night.
The language they're speaking is the language of subtly. Something you know nothing about.
I love the Money PIt. That is my answer to that.
Exactly.


I honestly haven't seen #3 at all. Kept hearing bad things about it and never took a try, but reading Camo's post, and since all three are on Netflix right now, I will do a rewatch of #2, which, I think I've only seen like 2 or 3 times compared to the countless times of watching the first Godfather; and then check out #3 and make a decision on whether I enjoy it or not. (Probably will).



Save the Texas Prairie Chicken
The Silence Of the Lambs

This was one of my father’s all-time favorites. He loved it. And I can still remember when I had to go to his house for a weekend, he was determined that I see it. I was 13 at the time. Yeah, that’s right. My parents never cared if their kids watched Rated R movies. I’ve seen this quite a few times. So I remembered it fairly well as I was watching it, but it has still been years since I last saw it. I would say it has easily been 20 years since I last watched it. It wasn’t a film that I watched so much because I was so in love with it, but, rather, it was one that was a good time killer. Don’t get me wrong. I thought it was a good movie. After all of this time, I thought it was going to be interesting to see how I feel about it now.

Here’s the problem. There is good acting. There is a good story. But I know it so well that the suspense is gone for me. And that doesn’t take away from the film as a whole, but it doesn’t help it either. As I watched it today I was kind of wishing I hadn’t seen it so many times in the past. I was kind of wishing that I had seen it only once (and let it be when I was 13) so that I could’ve had an experience that was similar to it being a first time viewing as there would’ve been such a big gap in between viewings. Therefore, I wouldn’t have remembered as much as I did. My memory kind of spoiled the film a little for me today.

But having said that, I didn’t take my eyes off the TV once. I was fully engaged with this one. There is a very good story and this is my kind of film. I’m all for a good crime thriller, and I think this is one of the best ones that have ever been made. The story really plays out so well. I kind of wish I would’ve read the book before having seen the film (I haven’t read it, by the way) just to compare, but also because I think this story would make for an excellent read. While I am not the biggest fan of Jodie Foster (I don’t see why she gets so much praise), I do have to give her credit for her performance in this. And Anthony Hopkins is very good in here, but I would think that would go without saying. It may sound crazy, but I always get to the point where I am kind of loving the thought that he is going to do what you know he is going to do at the end of the movie. I kind of think “Good for you!”.

One thing that irritates me is
WARNING: spoilers below
the scene where the woman gets kidnapped. I am going to assume that in the fictional world of Hannibal Lecter there is an element of the real world mixed in. And while I understand it was part of the story (I suppose deliberately so), I don’t understand why we have him wearing a cast and she goes over to help him with that piece of furniture. After all, he is doing nothing but pulling a Ted Bundy. And I could never understand how in real life any woman would’ve helped this man – with a supposed broken arm – with his bike when there were all of these men around that could help. And why would a man ride a bike with a broken arm, anyway?! That always baffled me that women would help Ted Bundy out. And since they did, you would think that a woman would most definitely not help a man out with a big piece of furniture that is wearing a cast if they know about Ted Bundy! I know it is probably purposely in there like that, but that just bothered me that that was how they got that part of the story going.

Overall, a very good movie. Other than The Prince of Tides, I think it was a good bunch of nominations that year. But I also think it should come as no surprise to anyone that I think Beauty and the Beast should’ve taken home the award. I won’t argue too much against this winning, though. It is a very good film.




Save the Texas Prairie Chicken
List has just been sent.

It's very flawed and almost universally agreed upon as the weakest of the three but i like it, there's some good stuff going on. If you get access to the dvd/blu ray make sure to listen to FFC's commentary, it's great.
OK. The one that I was going to watch is a copy that my father made onto a DVD. There is nothing else on there (I have no idea why he bought the first two but copied the third), but I will see about getting it from the library to listen to that. Why not?
I have something to return, anyway, this week and they have the DVD at that specific library.

I honestly haven't seen #3 at all. Kept hearing bad things about it and never took a try, but reading Camo's post, and since all three are on Netflix right now, I will do a rewatch of #2, which, I think I've only seen like 2 or 3 times compared to the countless times of watching the first Godfather; and then check out #3 and make a decision on whether I enjoy it or not. (Probably will).
I was going to watch it tonight (I am really not in the mood to watch another movie tonight, though), and then I thought about tomorrow, but I will wait now as I will get that from the library and watch it one of the nights this week instead.



OK. The one that I was going to watch is a copy that my father made onto a DVD. There is nothing else on there (I have no idea why he bought the first two but copied the third), but I will see about getting it from the library to listen to that. Why not?
I have something to return, anyway, this week and they have the DVD at that specific library.
It's honestly worth it. Think alot of my fondness for Part III is tied up with FFC's Commentary, he explains exactly what he was going for and i think it was a noble effort and could have been incredible but there was just certain things working against him. I still genuinely enjoy Part III independent of the Commentary but i totally get people really hating it.

I created a chart with explanations of each position in the Godfathers when i had Earache a few weeks ago thanks to this thread. Not sure how accurate it is it was all by memory and some of it is no doubt mixed up with the book but i think this is pretty much it if you've seen all three.

- = Acting. An Acting Boss/underboss/consiglieri/capo heads the family for the official boss, underboss, consiglieri or capo while they are in prison, sick, semi-retired, etc. Acting *position* operate in different ways, sometimes the official *position* gives them orders some times they don't do anything they just get a cut of the profits.

Boss:

Vito Corleone
-Sonny Corleone (Becomes Acting Boss after Vito is shot. murdered)
-Michael Corleone (Becomes Acting Boss when he comes back from Sicily. became Boss)
Michael Corleone
-Tom Hagen (Became Acting Boss when Michael Semi-retired. died)
-Joey Zaza (Replaced Tom upon his death. murdered after going to war with Michael/Vincent.)
Vincent Corleone

This is the position we know the most about, don't believe there was anything else that's missing. Tom Hagen may have been Acting Boss between Sonny and Michael as Michael is still in Sicily when Sonny is killed, Vito may not have had an Acting Boss until Michael returned though. Clemenza and Pentangelli where also Street Bosses at one point. Street Boss and Acting Boss are usually the same thing but sometimes there's a guy who deals with the captains and soldiers (Street Boss) and a guy who deals with the other Bosses, the Underboss/Consiglieri and the Official Boss (Acting Boss).

Underboss:

Sonny Corleone (murdered on the orders of the other families he went to war with after his fathers shooting. Barzini was the main person behind it.)
Pete Clemenza (stepped down when Michael came back from Sicily)
Michael Corleone (became Boss)
Fredo Corleone (killed for betraying Michael to Hyman Roth. He felt that Vito should have made him boss as he was the older brother, Fredo was kind of a moron and he didn't realize Roth was going to kill Michael or he wouldn't have got involved as he still loved Michael.)
Al Neri (Replaced Fredo upon his murder, Al ran Vegas for the semi-retired Michael. not sure if Al stayed on as Vincent's Underboss or he chose someone else)

There had to have been an underboss before Sonny as he was obviously a baby when the family was formed but that's not revealed, all we know is from the beginning Vito was Boss, Genco was Consiglieri and Tessio & Clemenza where the Captains.

Consiglieri:

Genco (Genco is the dude who gets Vito a job in Part II before Don Fanucci has his nephew take the job, he's dead by Part I. Like Vito he was basically a mythologized figure, he was a legendary consiglieri who Tom couldn't live up to evidenced by Sonny's "my father had Genco and look who i've got". died sometime between the events of the Part II flashbacks and Part I.)
Tom Hagen (Michael demoted him as he felt no one could give better advice than his father)
Vito Corleone (Semi-Retired Consig to Michael during the last year or so of his life. died)
Tom Hagen (died)
-Connie Corleone (Not sure whether to have her as official or acting. After Tom died Joey Zaza must have had a Consiglieri, possibly Squigaro. Connie operates as Consig to Michael when he takes over again in Part III but it never confirms her as such, it's possibly against the rules so her position was unnoficial, for all intents and purposes she was.)
Michael Corleone (Became semi-retired Consig to Vincent same as Vito had to himself, must have stepped down at some point as he went to Sicily and died there, possibly immediately after his daughters death. It's not said who replaced him.)

Capos:


Clemenza Crew:

Pete Clemenza (became Street Boss then died)
Frank Pentangelli (was probably acting while Clemenza was Street Boss but that's not confimed. Became Street Boss then an informant then killed himself.)
Willie Cicci (jailed, possibly became informant)

Clemenza was one of the first two capo's along with Tessio. Not sure what happened to this crew when Cicci was jailed and/or became an informant, the films don't go into it. There's various guys that could have took over but it would be a guess and it barely goes into those guys.

Tessio Crew:

Sal Tessio (murdered for attempting to arrange Michael's murdered to Barzini. Michael stops Tessio from retaliating against Barzini who is taking over his crews rackets, he also prevents Tessio and Clemenza from forming their own family something Vito promised. "Vito advises Michael that the one who tries to arrange the peace summit between the families will be the one setting Michael up, Michael points out when Hagen was surprised that it was Tessio that "it's the smart move. Tessio was always smarter.")
Al Neri (went to Vegas with Michael)

Again Tessio and Clemenza where the first two Captains. Not sure what happened when Neri went to Vegas the films don't go into it. Same deal as the Clemenza crew.

Corleone Crew:

Sonny Corleone (murdered, he was Underboss, Acting Boss and Capo at the same time at one point)
Joey Zaza (murdered, not sure if he was Capo while he was Acting Boss)

Squigaro or whatever his name is probably took over this crew either acting or officialy for Zaza when he became Acting Boss but i don't believe that's officially confirmed. Not sure what happened after Zaza and Squigaro where killed. Also Clemenza and Tessio where the first two Capo's as they came up with Vito but this crew was most likely formed later guessing when Sonny came of age, Sonny lead this while he was Underboss/Acting Boss, he possibly had an acting capo but it's not said who. Zaza isn't introduced until Part III so there could have been other Capo's between Sonny and him but it's not said who.

Vegas Crew:

Fredo Corleone (He was the Corleone's representative in Vegas, Moe Green was basically boss there until he was killed and the Corleone's took over. Became Underboss)
Rocco Lampone (Replaced Fredo when he became Underboss. killed by federal agents while assassinating Hyman Roth, was basically a suicide mission.)

Not sure what happened after Rocco's death it definitely still operated with Neri as Underboss being in charge of Vegas, maybe Neri was Capo while Underboss like Sonny was.

Pretty sure those where the only crews at least up to the end of Part II, between then and Part III other crews could have been formed.
I'm such a dork



The Silence Of the Lambs

While I am not the biggest fan of Jodie Foster (I don’t see why she gets so much praise), I do have to give her credit for her performance in this.
I don't think I've seen Jodie Foster in a lot of movies, but I liked her in this movie. It made me want to watch more of her movies, so I watched Contact a day or two after I watched this movie, and I liked her in that movie too.


One thing that irritates me is
WARNING: spoilers below
the scene where the woman gets kidnapped. I am going to assume that in the fictional world of Hannibal Lecter there is an element of the real world mixed in. And while I understand it was part of the story (I suppose deliberately so), I don’t understand why we have him wearing a cast and she goes over to help him with that piece of furniture. After all, he is doing nothing but pulling a Ted Bundy. And I could never understand how in real life any woman would’ve helped this man – with a supposed broken arm – with his bike when there were all of these men around that could help. And why would a man ride a bike with a broken arm, anyway?! That always baffled me that women would help Ted Bundy out. And since they did, you would think that a woman would most definitely not help a man out with a big piece of furniture that is wearing a cast if they know about Ted Bundy! I know it is probably purposely in there like that, but that just bothered me that that was how they got that part of the story going.



WARNING: "SPOILER!!!" spoilers below
I think most people are just inherently good, and try to help people who look like they're struggling to do something. That's why she helps him, and probably why women helped Ted Bundy. They didn't think that they were in any danger. They just wanted to help someone who needed help.



Vamps list is in and that makes four, plus I know GBGoodies is finished as well.

Really think it would be cool to unveil the results on Oscar Day, which is 3 weeks from now. Hope people can push to finish by then.

If not, not the end of the world either but still, would be cool.