Jinn's 100 Films of the 2010s

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Regarding some of these criticisms towards Hereditary (and, please God, let's not go too deep into that) even if I were to acknowledge that its narrative is reliant on a bunch of horror cliches (I'm not sure I do, but I can see the point), I personally think a horror film can be entirely built out of cliches and, as long as it reinvigorates them in some way, it can feel entirely fresh and original. Since Hereditary is not really about demonic possession as much as it is about grief laid completely bare, even if it took the most painfully obvious horror tropes, the context we find them in is what makes them startling and new. It's just a big ugly-cry of a film that just so happens to have witch cults in it. I'd have been fine if they were wearing pointy hats and stirring a bubbling cauldron up in that tree house. Just because I've seen some elements of it before, doesn't mean I've seen Hereditary.



Shivers is probably my favorite Cronenberg along with Videodrome. I think I prefer Rabid over The Brood.

You had me on board until you mentioned putting Rabid over The Brood, and I was just no no no no no.



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Di je Karlo?
People here are making top 100s, meanwhile I can barely piece together a top 3 lol


Oh well, there's a lot of films on here I've never heard of, and that's always a good sign. Looking forward to the rest of it.



77. Shame (2011, dir. Steve McQueen)





I might be more inclined towards the intersections of sexuality and psychological dysfunction than some viewers. It's not the most exciting type of film, and certainly not the most erotic. They neither turn me on or bleak me out, but the ones that can navigate the cracks of the facade to show real human reflection are the ones that might offer some balance between intimacy and performance.
That's a runner up for my favorite film of 2011. Have you seen McQueen's debut Hunger? I think I like that one a bit more.



75. A Ghost Story (2017, dir. David Lowery)





It's the story about a house, basically. But it's really about space, specific spaces. Existential, not horrible. The film glides through time much as one walks through a home. I admire the brass. The commitment. The only part that didn't work for me was the overly verbal segment with Will Oldham which is just the kind of hipster drain this film should have avoided.
I was really impressed by how much I liked that film. I wasn't expecting much from it, but it won me over with its intense emotional power. With that being said though, I did enjoy the Will Oldham monologue.



74. Shutter Island (2010, dir. Martin Scorsese)





(caveat: in B&W)


I thought that this thriller was pretty good on release, but I'm terminally committed to watching it in monochrome, as this provides the preferable splendor for my own private screenings. I'm not mad.

It's a mobius aesthetic that connects the pole between the B-movie matinee and late night television.
Besides The Irishman, that's my favorite of Scorsese's 2010's films. I was initially disappointed with the predictability of the plot twist, but since rewatching it a couple of times, I found the various visual sequences which allude to the twist more sensually powerful. Nowadays, I love the ride getting to the twist so much that I don't mind being able to predict the outcome.



More thoughts on the films I've seen on the list:

78. The Ghost Writer does work as a first rate mystery with Ewan McGregorís writer trying to figure out what the former Prime Minister Pierce Brosnan. While the subject is sent to the US to elude the International Criminal Court, the writer goes to work trying to figure out why his predecessor died by drowning and finds himself unraveling a lot more than he was expecting. Honestly, my first Polanski and IĎm interested in finding more of his films to watch.

74. Like a lot of films that are defined by the twist, I havenít seen Shutter Island a second time. But what I did find is a first rate thriller wrapped in some intrigue and in the hands of Martin Scorsese, the twist manages to be pulled off in such a way that it adds another layer to the story. Havenít tried it in black and white yet, but considering how it was filmed, it might be worth a go.



Ranking this ahead of Mandy was the correct choice.
It's the guy's Venom shirt at the end, isn't it?







Anyway, Rainbow has some stylistic pleasures as Mandy and is maybe a bit less obvious in its design, but lacks any sense of narrative momentum. I remember the ending being especially bad.



minds his own damn business
As a result, I have no doubt the story I submitted will be considered as being pro-facism and immediately disqualified, even though all I wanted to do was write an allegory about my cats.
Everyone knows. Cats are fascists. Like all natural predators.




__________________



minds his own damn business
I felt like it was a bit too calculated, for lack of a better word. On paper "Nic Cage heavy metal revenge flick" pretty much sells itself, but the finished product didn't make much of an impression on me. It was like Elevator Pitch: The Movie. I was onto their game as soon as I saw the trailer with the "it's...crazy...EVIL!" line. "Come watch Cage Cage the bleep out!"
(and I didn't even hate it, by the way)
I think the difference with other Nic Cage freaky deaky movies is how well Mandy establishes the perfectly unfreaky life of our main couple in the first half hour. This is the missing ingredient of so many Cage conniptions. You have to have contrast.



minds his own damn business
Have you seen McQueen's debut Hunger? I think I like that one a bit more.
I have but that one seemed more like a stunt for some reason. Still good. I've liked all of McQueen's films so far, even the ridiculous Widows almost solely on that great limo cam shot.


I was initially disappointed with the predictability of the plot twist....
Bah, I think the twist is pretty distracting, and I've come to loathe these "Big Twist" movies as such. Anyway the real twist....
WARNING: spoilers below
that Teddy consciously decides his fate
is far more powerful.



minds his own damn business
I remember the ending being especially bad.
It's definitely silly, but I kinda thought it was refreshingly so after all of the gloom. I laughed, because 'f#ck you, dude'. Great way to puncture his self-congratulatory rampage. Meet rock, ass#ole.



Besides The Irishman, that's my favorite of Scorsese's 2010's films. I was initially disappointed with the predictability of the plot twist, but since rewatching it a couple of times, I found the various visual sequences which allude to the twist more sensually powerful. Nowadays, I love the ride getting to the twist so much that I don't mind being able to predict the outcome.
Also, don't forget that its plot is essentially
WARNING: spoilers below
Inception from the point of view of the "inceptee".



I have but that one seemed more like a stunt for some reason. Still good. I've liked all of McQueen's films so far, even the ridiculous Widows almost solely on that great limo cam shot.
I can understand that reaction, but I really enjoyed it, personally. Though consistently violent at times, it definitely has a seductive power which often leaves me in a trance when I watch it. The sense I got from the film was that both the prison guards and the prisoners were tired and worn down by the protests and wanted them to stop, yet nobody wanted to be the side who'd give in. I found the film really powerful, personally.

Bah, I think the twist is pretty distracting, and I've come to loathe these "Big Twist" movies as such. Anyway the real twist....
WARNING: spoilers below
that Teddy consciously decides his fate
is far more powerful.
Yeah, I'm not a big fan of "Big Twist" movies as well. Something like The Sixth Sense handled the twist ending really well, but all too often, the twists seem secondary to the plot and more or less exist to surprise the viewer, which is fine and all, but in my experiences, this doesn't have much staying power. However, I agree with you that the twist you included via spoilered text is superior.



Also, don't forget that its plot is essentially
WARNING: spoilers below
Inception from the point of view of the "inceptee".
Hm, could you elaborate on that point? It's been a while since I've seen Inception, so some of the details slipped my mind since then.



minds his own damn business
73. Francis Ha! (2012, dir. Noah Baumbach)





I know I've already shirked off Baumbach, but, let's face facts, this is purely Greta Gerwig's movie through and through. He owed her, of course, for subjecting her to Greenberg's feeble wits, but this film is the culmination of the sweet charm bristling from Hannah Takes the Stairs or Nights and Weekends that was obviously too bold and precious for mumblecore to contain. And it's hardly a mystery why Greta has taken off on her own writing/directing career almost immediately afterward, because she's got to have it.



The trick is not minding
73. Francis Ha! (2012, dir. Noah Baumbach)





I know I've already shirked off Baumbach, but, let's face facts, this is purely Greta Gerwig's movie through and through. He owed her, of course, for subjecting her to Greenberg's feeble wits, but this film is the culmination of the sweet charm bristling from Hannah Takes the Stairs or Nights and Weekends that was obviously too bold and precious for mumblecore to contain. And it's hardly a mystery why Greta has taken off on her own writing/directing career almost immediately afterward, because she's got to have it.
Iíve been meaning to watch this one for the past few years. Iím not terribly familiar with mumblecore, although itís possible I may have seen more then I realize, but I hope to get a better understanding of it through this and what ever else I find. I think Iíll include the two other titles you just provided.



minds his own damn business
72. Hail Caesar! (2016, dir. Coen Brothers)





A minor Coen Bros. film, perhaps, but an interesting attempt at satirizing the parallel myth machines of religion and Hollywood (rendering both unto commerce), while Cold War myths linger in the background (and sink marvelously). The film is probably better known for its elaborate homages to the likes of Busby Berkeley, Gene Autry, Gene Kelly, etc., and some fun attempts at inside joke casting (George Clooney = Victor Mature; Ralph Fiennes = Ernst Lubitsch, etc), but the film is so straight-faced silly that it earns more grins than laughs. The best jokes, like whether or not Jesus is an extra, are too meta to register for most audiences.



minds his own damn business
I thought you hated Frances, Rock.



Iíve been meaning to watch this one for the past few years. Iím not terribly familiar with mumblecore, although itís possible I may have seen more then I realize, but I hope to get a better understanding of it through this and what ever else I find. I think Iíll include the two other titles you just provided.
I'm not much of a fan of the mumblecore genre in general, so I'm not a good source, but I will recommend Hannah Takes the Stairs and Nights and Weekends solely based on Gerwig's abilities.



The trick is not minding
I thought you hated Frances, Rock.




I'm not much of a fan of the mumblecore genre in general, so I'm not a good source, but I will recommend Hannah Takes the Stairs and Nights and Weekends solely based on Gerwig's abilities.
Itís as good as any place to start. Thanks.