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Film Noir HoF - Part 2

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Yeah, there was some question if this was a noir or not. It's a great film and it has some noir elements, but some may or may not feel it's a noir. If someone wants to take it's noir status into account when scoring it, that's fine. You guys and dame, decide.
I will never in a million years do that but since it is a noir HOF I do think it is interesting to talk about. It feels more noir than A Face In The Crowd, which doesn't feel noir at all.
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Sean, I didn't write my post very clear, sorry. I wasn't talking about my own nomination.

I was talking about A Face in The Crowd as being noir or not? Both Captain Spaulding and Cricket raised that issue, and I can understand it.

So I was trying to say, if any one wants to score A Face in the Crowd based on if they feel it's a noir or not, that's their call and no worries.

You guys and dame, decide.
I hope that didn't get understood as a typo, like I was saying 'Damn it you decide!'

I meant 'dame' like the noir term for woman, as we have one here, SilentVamp. But I could see the sentence could look like a hostile typo. It wasn't I thought it would be humorous.



I suck at spelling! I just typed interrupted when I wanted to say interpreted. So I changed the word to understood. Yes, I'm spelling challenged and spell check often 'corrects' the word to the wrong word.



Save the Texas Prairie Chicken
Where's everybody else at? Have you guys, or dame, seen any of the movies? We can talk talk about them in any order, no worries.
I haven't started yet. I have just 2 to watch for the 10th and I will start these. I plan on beginning within the next week or so.

I meant 'dame' like the noir term for woman, as we have one here, SilentVamp. But I could see the sentence could look like a hostile typo. It wasn't I thought it would be humorous.
I completely understood what you were doing, and I loved it!
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Scarlet Street (Fritz Lang, 1945)
nominated by Citizen Rules


I haven't seen much from Fritz Lang, prior to this I've only watched House on the River and Dr. Mabuse the Gambler. Neither of which I fully finished, so my expectations weren't extremely high for this. But I truly believe that Scarlet Street is a true masterpiece, and I don't use that term lightly. I immediately felt great admiration for this film with the realism of the characters, which is something that is often lacking in not only film noir but most films of this era. Even in some of the greatest classics prior to the 1950s, the characters in the film feel like just that, characters. In Scarlet Street they felt like people. While the supporting crew such as Christopher's wife or Millie lack depth- and I wouldn't apply this praise to them- the main cast is superb. Brilliant acting by Edward G. Robinson creates a compellingly real portrait of a pitiful and naive man past his non-existent prime, falling for a gold digger. His character reminds me of Dr. Isak Borg from Bergman's classic Wild Strawberries. The gold digger isn't just a woman though, it's her fiance as well. Both of which feel like true immoral villains. The way Lang balances the narrative between the three creates a truly empathetic first two acts for the audience. I felt extremely emotionally connected to this film, which is something I frankly haven't felt in a long time.

The first two acts are drama gold, but the third act is a true piece of artistic cinema. It's hard to delve too far into this without talking about synopsis, which is something I don't find interesting to write about.

The last 30 minutes are dark as can be. Satisfying, daunting, mesmerizing, and thought invoking all together. A midnight black piece of existential poetry. The final two scenes are perhaps as haunting as the finale of Psycho. A brilliant exploration regarding the rise of immoral-ism in man and the karma that is brought from it.

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For me Dan Duryea made the movie. His performance was so memorable I can still remember it. I liked his sleazy, sniveling, shifty character, very colorful! and I think it added a lot. This is my favorite performance of his, next to the one he did in Winchester '73.
Amen. I think Duryea is superb in his role as a gambling con-man. He's a consistent degenerate by all means, and as you said colorful too! Which is a balance you usually don't see in film, but is common for a true sociopath.



Cross on the other hand obviously isn't a sociopath but instead acts on foolishness and emotion. While he arguably ends up committing more immoral acts, he's not the more immoral character. And he doesn't have the charm or confidence of Johnny. I really the think what makes this film great is the examination of what's the motif that makes each character so immoral



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.
Anybody who likes Scarlet Street should check out Lang's previous film with the same three stars, The Woman in the Window.
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I have to return some videotapes...
Amen. I think Duryea is superb in his role as a gambling con-man. He's a consistent degenerate by all means, and as you said colorful too! Which is a balance you usually don't see in film, but is common for a true sociopath.
Glad you enjoy the film, but don't you think Duryea's character was a little one note. His performance I will agree is slimy and devious, but there isn't really an arc to his character. I don't know if he really is a sociopath, since he isn't antisocial by any means. I do agree with your review about the film's third act, that scene were he starts trying to sleep is fantastic acting and incredibly well lit and shot. What was your favorite scene? Mine personally is when he described the feeling he has about art because it shows the passion he has and also subliminally shows the feelings he has for Kitty. A lot of is well done, but there is a couple missteps.
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Excellent review DonnieDarko. I'm glad you appreciated the film. You hit the nail on the head with your description of Robinson character: "pitiful and naive man past his non-existent prime," and you got Dan Duryea's character down pat too: "a consistent degenerate....a true sociopath." He really is a sociopath...he would play that character in a number of movies and become quite popular for it.

Did anyone think that Kitty 'lazy legs' was a prostitute? And Johnny was her boyfriend/pimp? That's the impression I got. The film is made during the Hays Production Code so it's not surprising that she is called an out of work model, which often is a catch word in old films for a hooker.



I didn't get that impression because it seems unlikely she would have hesitated at all about the con and even more unlikely that she would be unwilling to let Robinson touch her.



Sean I know you like Robinson, have you seen him in Soylent Green? It was his last role and he was very ill at the time of shooting...and yet he gave a very touching warm performances. I think he makes the movie. You might want to check that film out.



Glad you enjoy the film, but don't you think Duryea's character was a little one note. His performance I will agree is slimy and devious, but there isn't really an arc to his character. I don't know if he really is a sociopath, since he isn't antisocial by any means.
Most sociopath's aren't. In fact most know how to get there way around things and manipulate people, which Johnny is pretty good at. I don't think he had much depth, but I don't think a character like that needs to. I think it adds to his immoral aspect, and when you examine why each character takes the unethical route they take, Johnny's character make sense- since unlike the others their was no depth to his action.

Johnny- Greed
Kitty- Love for Johnny
Cross- Love for Kitty/delusion

It's a love triangle, but Johnny doesn't seem to love anyone but himself. There are a lot of small moments that I think truly demonstrate how self-immersed Johnny is. Like when Kitty notices he got himself a new watch before getting her a ring

I do agree with your review about the film's third act, that scene were he starts trying to sleep is fantastic acting and incredibly well lit and shot. What was your favorite scene? Mine personally is when he described the feeling he has about art because it shows the passion he has and also subliminally shows the feelings he has for Kitty. A lot of is well done, but there is a couple missteps.
The scene you mentioned is indeed really good, superb acting and dialogue. My favorite would actually be the scene where he's trying to go to sleep. It's the wrap-up of each character paying their dues, and rather haunting at the same time.

Did anyone think that Kitty 'lazy legs' was a prostitute? And Johnny was her boyfriend/pimp? That's the impression I got. The film is made during the Hays Production Code so it's not surprising that she is called an out of work model, which often is a catch word in old films for a hooker.
Didn't catch that, but I could definitely see some suggestions towards that. Even the name "Kitty". At the same time though she's the most prudish character. She felt uncomfortable when Cross would show her intimacy, and when Johnny suggested taking it a step farther with the art critic she seemed offended. So I'm not sure if she was a prostitute, maybe in the original novel that was the intent



Sean I know you like Robinson, have you seen him in Soylent Green? It was his last role and he was very ill at the time of shooting...and yet he gave a very touching warm performances. I think he makes the movie. You might want to check that film out.
I'll add it to the massive watch list I have going.



Save the Texas Prairie Chicken
I know some people started early, but this has officially started, right?

I'm only asking because I just need a deadline. That is all. Did you have one posted or did I miss it?

I really think I will be starting a tad bit later than everyone else this time. So I need to know for sure when I need to get them all watched by.

Thank you.



I know some people started early, but this has officially started, right?

I'm only asking because I just need a deadline. That is all. Did you have one posted or did I miss it?

I really think I will be starting a tad bit later than everyone else this time. So I need to know for sure when I need to get them all watched by.

Thank you.
I did post the start but I haven't posted the deadline yet, sorry. We have 11 movies, so I guess it has to be 11 weeks long starting from last Thursday. I will figure out what day that will be and post it on the first post and also post it on the last post (current post).



I liked the movie Scarlet Street, but I didn't really like Edward G. Robinson in the role of Cross. He just seemed too wimpy for Robinson to play that type of character. But the movie itself was very good, and I had mixed feelings about the ending.

WARNING: "SPOILERS ABOUT THE ENDING!!!" spoilers below
I liked the fact that everyone seems to get what they deserve, but they way Cross gets his felt a little too supernatural to me. It didn't feel realistic. It was the first scene that kind of took me out of the movie.
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