MoFo Movie Roulette II (a movie watching participation event)

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The Raid (2011)
Directed By: Gareth Evans
Starring: Iko Uwais, Joe Taslim, Yayan Ruhian

I thought people were understating the similarities between The Raid and Dredd, and that it would just be the basic premise that was the same. It does go slightly deeper than that, but they're clearly two very different films. While Gareth Evans did joke about needing to rush production of The Raid when the script for Dredd leaked online, I do believe that the resemblance is entirely coincidental, and largely a consequence of restricting action to a single enclosed location.

The Raid opts for a more gritty, realistic approach to its cinematography. Filming fast-paced action on a handheld camera without the assistance of a steadicam often leads to a shaky mess that's hard to watch. Luckily here it is just a stylistic choice, rather than something being used to intentionally hide stuntmen or poor choreography, so the action is still clearly framed, and it's easy to follow what's going on. It does border on being too hectic at times, but it works well overall.

The film really comes into its own when it drops the guns and switches to martial arts. This is when the physical abilities of its actors are on full display, with impressive hand-to-hand sequences that look and feel appropriately brutal. Dialogue is fairly minimal throughout, and with such a simple premise, it's refreshing that there isn't any unnecessary exposition. It does feel like the runtime could've been trimmed to a lean 90 minutes, but cutting any of the action would be a disgrace to the choreographers' excellent work.




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Here’s looking at you, kid.


The Raid (2011)
Directed By: Gareth Evans
Starring: Iko Uwais, Joe Taslim, Yayan Ruhian

The film really comes into its own when it drops the guns and switches to martial arts. This is when the physical abilities of its actors are on full display, with impressive hand-to-hand sequences that look and feel appropriately brutal. Dialogue is fairly minimal throughout, and with such a simple premise, it's refreshing that there isn't any unnecessary exposition. It does feel like the runtime could've been trimmed to a lean 90 minutes, but cutting any of the action would be a disgrace to the choreographers' excellent work.




Glad you liked the film!



Here’s looking at you, kid.
Round 1

@Citizen Rules @Allaby
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@edarsenal @jiraffejustin
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@CosmicRunaway @BooBooKittyFock
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Let's start this!
Tag your partner when you post your three movie selections for them, they will then choose one of them that they haven't seen.

If you don't know your partner's movie taste just do a little research, or just ask them.
What day will every new round fall on?



What day will every new round fall on?
Good question...I don't know to be honest. The days could change but about a week after the previous round the new one can start. Kind of depends on how active people are.



Black Narcissus

I figured with it being Pressburger and Powell that I should expect greatness as they have yet to fail me. Visually this is an A1 film with gorgeous technicolor and top-of-the-line tricks-of-the-trade that (not to beat a dead horse) look a million times better than the CGI that would be used today. The only negative I can think of in the visual front is that sometimes there is a glowing white line where the painting and real stuff collide, but I wouldn't have even noticed that had it not been pointed out to me. This film is also one of the most sexually tense films I've seen in recent memory, and that is without ever really showing anything at all. It is all done with wonderful facial expressions and excellent direction. The scenes where Kanchi is on her knees at the feet of the Young General are about as sexually overt as you can be, but there is also the fact that she is a poor orphan and he is nobility. Works on multiple levels there as they say. Tremendous facial acting by the ladies playing the Nuns, specifically Clodagh and Ruth, but there isn't really a negative mark to be given in that department to the nuns. Great film that works as a psychosexual drama and a haunted/cursed place horror film.




Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
Black Narcissus

I figured with it being Pressburger and Powell that I should expect greatness as they have yet to fail me. Visually this is an A1 film with gorgeous technicolor and top-of-the-line tricks-of-the-trade that (not to beat a dead horse) look a million times better than the CGI that would be used today. The only negative I can think of in the visual front is that sometimes there is a glowing white line where the painting and real stuff collide, but I wouldn't have even noticed that had it not been pointed out to me. This film is also one of the most sexually tense films I've seen in recent memory, and that is without ever really showing anything at all. It is all done with wonderful facial expressions and excellent direction. The scenes where Kanchi is on her knees at the feet of the Young General are about as sexually overt as you can be, but there is also the fact that she is a poor orphan and he is nobility. Works on multiple levels there as they say. Tremendous facial acting by the ladies playing the Nuns, specifically Clodagh and Ruth, but there isn't really a negative mark to be given in that department to the nuns. Great film that works as a psychosexual drama and a haunted/cursed place horror film.

I was pretty amazed by it when it was nominated for me in the first Personal Rec HoF. And very happy to hear and pleasantly amazed by your score.
Psychosexual drama is an excellent description of it while at the same time, never fully expresses the experience of viewing this film. If that makes sense.

Never knew about the glowing white line so I imagine I'll be looking for it on my next viewing of this.
When I wrote about it, part of that review HAD to include images:





[/quote]
__________________
What to do if you find yourself stuck with no hope of rescue:
Consider yourself lucky that life has been good to you so far. Alternatively, if life hasn't been good to you so far, which given your present circumstances seems more likely, consider yourself lucky that it won't be troubling you much longer.



Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?


The Raid (2011)
Directed By: Gareth Evans
Starring: Iko Uwais, Joe Taslim, Yayan Ruhian

I thought people were understating the similarities between The Raid and Dredd, and that it would just be the basic premise that was the same. It does go slightly deeper than that, but they're clearly two very different films. While Gareth Evans did joke about needing to rush production of The Raid when the script for Dredd leaked online, I do believe that the resemblance is entirely coincidental, and largely a consequence of restricting action to a single enclosed location.

The Raid opts for a more gritty, realistic approach to its cinematography. Filming fast-paced action on a handheld camera without the assistance of a steadicam often leads to a shaky mess that's hard to watch. Luckily here it is just a stylistic choice, rather than something being used to intentionally hide stuntmen or poor choreography, so the action is still clearly framed, and it's easy to follow what's going on. It does border on being too hectic at times, but it works well overall.

The film really comes into its own when it drops the guns and switches to martial arts. This is when the physical abilities of its actors are on full display, with impressive hand-to-hand sequences that look and feel appropriately brutal. Dialogue is fairly minimal throughout, and with such a simple premise, it's refreshing that there isn't any unnecessary exposition. It does feel like the runtime could've been trimmed to a lean 90 minutes, but cutting any of the action would be a disgrace to the choreographers' excellent work.




I agree, cutting it WOULD HAVE been a disgrace to the incredible work of the choreographers. So, SOOO many cringing "OH SH#T!" fight moments in this film that goes beyond stylistic into the - as you remarked, "Brutal", and yet it never ever gets mundane or overdone. In fact, it truly does escalate as the film reaches its climax. This really says a lot for a minimalistic storyline and dialogue set in one location - or rather, the many floors in one building.

Also, the hand-held filming is a perfect fit for this intense, action film. Complimenting those hectic moments that occur.



Some of the close-ups of the women would make excellent screenshots as well. I'm too lazy to do this, but if I wasn't I'd go back through and grab some in order and show the progression of these women throughout the film. From the way they are shot to the lighting techniques used and the way they are framed in doorways and other places, such as Ruth peering around the banister, the makeup on Ruth near the end, and obviously how these women managed to manipulate their faces, it was all tremendously visually represented.



So, SOOO many cringing "OH SH#T!" fight moments in this film that goes beyond stylistic into the - as you remarked, "Brutal", and yet it never ever gets mundane or overdone.
I think the first time I went "OH WOW" was when Rama does a horizontal jump backwards through a door frame, dragging a guy with him to slam down on the broken wood below.

I do really like any stunts that involve doors, even though that one was essentially open haha. My favourite will probably always be David Belle slipping through a door's small window in District B13 though. Super impressive.





@CosmicRunaway

I'll add more choices later if you want me to, but here is a quick choice that I didn't see on your Letterboxd or MoFo Lists: Throne of Blood (1957; Kurosawa)

I'm at work, but I wanted to get something out there quicker than I did last time.



I'll add more choices later if you want me to, but here is a quick choice that I didn't see on your Letterboxd or MoFo Lists: Throne of Blood (1957; Kurosawa)

I'm at work, but I wanted to get something out there quicker than I did last time.
I've not seen that one yet, and I do love Toshiru Mifune. If you don't think you'll have time to find two more suggestions (there's no rush btw), I am more than happy to watch Throne of Blood.



Here are some quick scatter-gun style picks for you. Normally it would take me time to whittle down this list, but here is the raw, uncut rough list of picks that came to mind.

Throne of Blood
Who Killed Captain Alex?
Black Girl (1966)
Demons (1971)
At Midnight I'll Take Your Soul (1964)
Amarcord
The Decameron (1971)
Bottle Rocket
All That Heaven Allows



Here are some quick scatter-gun style picks for you. Normally it would take me time to whittle down this list, but here is the raw, uncut rough list of picks that came to mind.
I thought you were supposed to be at work?

A couple of those looks interesting, but Throne of Blood was honestly a great pick, so I'll go with that.



Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
I think the first time I went "OH WOW" was when Rama does a horizontal jump backwards through a door frame, dragging a guy with him to slam down on the broken wood below.

I do really like any stunts that involve doors, even though that one was essentially open haha. My favourite will probably always be David Belle slipping through a door's small window in District B13 though. Super impressive.


I've always wanted to see District B13 just for that style of acrobatics. I think the very first time I saw, what could be the genesis of that style was seeing Jackie Chan when Rumble in the Bronx came out and for me, fences work the same way.



Its evolving into this is extraordinary




I've always wanted to see District B13 just for that style of acrobatics. I think the very first time I saw, what could be the genesis of that style was seeing Jackie Chan when Rumble in the Bronx came out and for me, fences work the same way.
Is this a hint that someone should give you the option to watch it during the roulette haha?

District B13 has some great stunts, and it's more than worth checking out for those alone. The plot is pretty generic, but it's a fun time if that's the kind of action flick you're in the mood for. David Belle, who plays the main character, is actually one of the pioneers of parkour.

I've not seen Rumble in the Bronx since it was new, and I keep mixing up a lot of Jackie Chan's films, to the point where I can't tell most of them apart. I should probably give it a rewatch.



Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
Some of the close-ups of the women would make excellent screenshots as well. I'm too lazy to do this, but if I wasn't I'd go back through and grab some in order and show the progression of these women throughout the film. From the way they are shot to the lighting techniques used and the way they are framed in doorways and other places, such as Ruth peering around the banister, the makeup on Ruth near the end, and obviously how these women managed to manipulate their faces, it was all tremendously visually represented.
I know EXACTLY what you mean.








The Marrying Kind (George Cukor 1952)

@Allaby chose three movies for me and I went with One Foot in Heaven but I should've picked this one as I was impressed!

Judy Holliday is one unique actress who sadly didn't make that many movies. She won an Oscar for Best Actress for Born Yesterday (1950). Two years later she was hauled in front of House Un-American Activities Committee a victim of McCarthyism and charged with being a communist...What resulted was a two year hiatus from movies which basically stalled her once promising movie career. She only made 9 feature movies where she was prominently featured. I've seen 3 of her films now and plan on watching the rest. Judy Holliday died at 43.

The Marrying Kind is labeled a comedy drama, but it's a very frank look at a young, poor married couple who experience tragedy and end up turning on each other. It was a honest look at marriage especially for Hollywood circa 1952. I was impressed with the screenplay and of course by George Cukor who's one of the great humanist directors. This was Aldo Ray's first film and he's quite believable as a sometimes insecure, jerk of a husband.



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