Brexit

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So Brexit will come into force today. Can someone tell me in simple language as to what are the advantages and pitfalls of it , and why people voted for it by a narrow margin.



Ugh, definitely not gonna discuss Brexit. I need to relax.
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Don't want a heavy duty discussion. But why did those who voted for it vote for it and why did those who opposed it oppose it---in simple words.



I'm an American, and I have no clue about the details of Brexit. But I can guess that if I was born in London or somewhere in the heart of the UK, I'd not be wanting continental Europeans dictating to my country on immigration and such. To me it would seem like a clash of cultural values. Yeah, yeah I know technically the UK is in Europe but the UK is not of Europe. It has it's own unique identity based on part from being an island nation that was separated from the mainland.



I live in Scotland, and there still exists a strong feeling that as a nation having been dragged out against it's will.

Scotland voted overwhelmingly against Brexit, and that sentiment has not changed since. It should be noted that during the Indy Referendum that the Tories made any number of promises to Scotland should it decide to remain as part of the UK - promises that have entirely been left unfulfilled over a whole range of issues, however as it related to the EU, the case was that remaining as part of the UK would ensure Scotland having a presence in the EU, which has subsequently been completely undermined.

Without derailing this thread to be about the merits etc of Scottlish Independance, sadly the day has come; that Brexit is a reality and that despite the nationalistic sentiments here, being part of the EU was good for Scotland and there is a current of resentment over once again being railroaded.



Unfortunately even the why is part of the issue. Some people will tell you it's just a retrograde backlash to multiculturalism, others will defend it as asserting independence and resisting centralized power, even though presumably each is true for some people and not others.

There's also the question of whether it's reckless even if you take the second view, too.

I suppose that's part of why this is tricky: there's the merits of being independent themselves, and then whether or not the reasons for wanting that are as pure as the idea can be, and then there's also "is this the way to go about it even if it's good?"

Messy stuff, to say the least.



But why did those who voted for it vote for it
They voted for Brexit because of immigration. They hope after Brexit they will be able to lower immigration,- both EU and the rest of the world. EU immigration will definitelly fall. Non EU immigration, which is higher than EU immigration, will depend on new policies. Non EU immigration might rise because of the need to fill up job vacancies.
why did those who opposed it oppose it
Because of economic reasons and EU citizen rights and freedoms which are such that Brexit party members and Nigel Farage himself described as super rights, contradicting their own stance and unaware of the irony. When I heard Nigel Farage opposing Northern Irish getting Republic of Ireland citizenship because it would be unfair to other UK Nationals, that's when I realized Farage was full of s... But Nigel Farage has German citizenship himself.

EU was conceived from the start to be a project preventing wars. One way is by intertwining EU economies so much that war becomes impossible because all countries are dependable on one another for smooth functioning. The hit to UK's economy will be like loosing a war or at the very least like being imposed sanctions by bigger economic power.

UK will lose not only frictionless trade with EU, it will also lose trade agreements that EU has with the rest of the world. It's back to square one for UK.