The MoFo Top 100 Westerns: Countdown

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3 Bad Men or The Iron Horse perhaps then?
Hmm, I seen 3 Bad Men, but it very well might be The Iron Horse. Either that or something called The Great K & A Train Robbery. If there was a movie named that?



Watched the Great Train Robbery but it sadly did not make my list. Glad to see it here, however!

Seen: 6/42
- Slow West (#95)
- The Big Gundown (#85)
- The Furies (#84)
- The Shooting (#71)
- The Grey Fox (#66)
- The Great Train Robbery (#60)

My ballot:
None
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Hmm, I seen 3 Bad Men, but it very well might be The Iron Horse. Either that or something called The Great K & A Train Robbery. If there was a movie named that?
There was (1926) and if I remember correctly crick did quite like it (usual caveat regarding my terrible memory) - it's a
+ film for me.
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There was (1926) and if I remember correctly crick did quite like it (usual caveat regarding my terrible memory) - it's a
+ film for me.
Key word: terrible memory...that's me!




Spoiler alert, but Edwin S. Porter’s The Great Train Robbery is the oldest film on the countdown. If anybody was holding out hopes for your 1901 or 1899 favorites you can extinguish them. The 1903 12-minute film is credited as the first narrative in the Western genre. It was among the first of the Silents to use real locations rather than just sets, and perhaps apocryphal stories have existed for over a hundred years that unsophisticated moviegoers still experiencing the artform for the first time would scream or duck when they saw the most famous shot of the bandit looking right into the camera, lowering his pistol, and firing “at” the audience. The film may have been inspired at least partially by one of the real Butch Cassidy’s actual train robberies. ...
I always thought it was interesting that a "western" was shot in New Jersey. Maybe west NJ.. It was supposedly based upon Butch Cassidy's famous train robbery which took place in Wyoming. The L.A. film industry wasn't to get rolling for another 15 years or so.



Yeah, Young Guns is my #1...The Lincoln County War was a huge part of my childhood studies, so I'm super happy to have the most accurate movie based on it, make MoFo's list.
I have a feeling this is much like Rodent after a few drinks...

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Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
For the life of me I cannot remember if I have actually seen Django so I will simply add it to my Rectification List


My second to appear on my List is a Peckinpah film I refused to let go to the wayside; Ride the High Country. An excellent middle road as well as a turning point for Peckinpah as a Director. We get a peek into where he would go and the influence into the Revisionism of the Western genre. With their famed personas switched around, both Scott and McCrea bring out some of their very best work as, what would become a staple of Peckinpah regarding aged gunslingers nearing the end of their respective trails.
Unlike other Peckinpah films that I had gobbled up in my youth, it was only in the last few years that I finally watched this. Being an aged slinger me self gave that first time watch and the others that followed a deeper kinship to both the characters and to hellbent man that loved cards, booze and women that directed it.

I have a begrudging admittance to City Slickers being an entertaining film, though it was never a consideration when constructing my list.


While I'm incapable of claiming the number of rewatches that @The Rodent has, I do, truly love this film and, like others that I was unable to put on my list, it broke my heart NOT to include it.
Entertaining and with a pretty strong respect to the Historical facts of the Lincoln War, this is one of the very best portrayals of Billy The Kid for me. With Polland in Dirty Little Billy coming pretty [email protected] close. From the laugh to the cocky bravado, Emilio nails it as the boy that is "sent in like a lamb into the slaughter and he comes out a King Sheep." and is thought of, by his pals, that "He ain't all there, is he?"
While there are countless scenes I enjoy, the shootout at McSween's house where Billy warns Charlie that he better start shooting or he ain't gonna see his new wife ever again. Both of them garnering the courage off of one another, always got my heart and blood to pumping.

I'm going to try to rectify The Great Train Robbery this weekend. . . try to

And, while it sounds very familiar, I do not believe I've seen She Wore a Yellow Ribbon



Movies Watched 24 out of 42 (57.14%)

MY LIST

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6. Ride The High Country (#63)
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11. The Grey Fox (#66)
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Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
Hmm, I seen 3 Bad Men, but it very well might be The Iron Horse. Either that or something called The Great K & A Train Robbery. If there was a movie named that?
Yes there is!


Under the Western List it is listed and for a long time I had wondered if it was a secondary name for the 12 minute silent film, but it's not.



Hmm, I seen 3 Bad Men, but it very well might be The Iron Horse. Either that or something called The Great K & A Train Robbery. If there was a movie named that?
I nominated 3 Bad Men for a HoF, but it is The Iron Horse you're thinking of. I did like The Great K & A Train Robbery more than The Great Train Robbery, but I liked that too, as well as She Wore a Yellow Ribbon. No votes from me.



I nominated 3 Bad Men for a HoF, but it is The Iron Horse you're thinking of. I did like The Great K & A Train Robbery more than The Great Train Robbery, but I liked that too, as well as She Wore a Yellow Ribbon. No votes from me.
Ah, so Chyp was right along, it was The Iron Horse.



The Great Train Robbery was worth watching for historical reasons, but I never considered it for my list. However I'm not surprised to see it made the countdown, and it deserves to be on the list.

I watched several John Wayne movies for this countdown, including She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, but it wasn't one of the better movies that I watched, and it didn't make my list.
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Ah, so Chyp was right along, it was The Iron Horse.
Kewl, it's a much better fillum than The K & A Train Robbery (which is more a 'sat mat'* type affair imo).

*saturday matinee



I really thought I put The Great Train Robbery on my list. Apparently not. That’s my mistake.

Anyway, it still made the list as expected and quite a bit higher than expected maybe. I send in a partial so that’s why I certainly would have put it on my list. And I do like it. Obviously it’s not one I would sit down and watch all the time, but it was very groundbreaking for its time, not just having “effects” or gimmicks to rely on but actually trying to have a narrative with suspense and different storylines and locations and whatnot. Storytelling was pretty strong in that one for its time. Great piece of history for cinema.



Saw The Great Train Robbery a long time ago and enjoyed it but I, too, mainly considered it a historical piece of film and not one that I loved.

She Wore a Yellow Ribbon was a John Wayne movie I liked but didn't love and that was rare for me. Of the "Cavalry Trilogy" of Wayne and Ford, this one would probably rank in third place for me. My favorite of the three is "Rio Grande," but I included none of those Wayne/Ford flicks on my list, opting for ones I watch more often and love better.
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Like the 1980s Apple II computer video game the actual Oregon Trail was a treacherous journey. In Kelly Reichardt’s Meek’s Cutoff, based on a true story, we get an existential ride along with a small wagon train through the high mountain desert. When the days stretch on longer than anticipated the party begins to fear that their guide Stephen Meek (Bruce Greenwood) may have gotten them lost, and eventually it is the women (led by Reichardt’s muse Michelle Williams) that take over the decision making. Gender dynamics and racism towards Native Americans are coupled with the desert vistas and a heap of tension. Meek’s Cutoff made the MoFo Top 100 Films Directed by Women list at #56 and lands at almost exactly the same spot here. On the Westerns countdown it grabbed six votes including a ninth place, a fourth place, and a first place.



The Duke is back on the countdown again already in what turned out to be his swan song. In The Shootist the cancer-ridden legendary Western actor plays a cancer-ridden legendary gunman who rides into town to face his mortal enemies one last time before the disease takes him. Wayne actually didn’t have cancer at the time of filming (though he did have a severe case of the flu halting production as well as many other deteriorations and ailments), but cancer is what took him quickly a few years later. Still, the parallels between the real life and movie version of the man are obvious. The Shootist features a high power cast of former Wayne co-stars including Lauren Bacall, Jimmy Stewart, Richard Boone, Hugh O'Brian, John Carradine, and Harry Morgan with Ron Howard and Bill McKinney (Deliverance, The Outlaw Josey Wales) along for the sunset ride and also opens with clips of Red River, Hondo, Rio Bravo, and El Dorado to show why John Wayne/J.B. Brooks is a legendary Western star/gunman. Apparently Wayne and director Don Siegel (#98's Two Mules for Sister Sara) didn’t get along particularly well with their different sensibilities at odds. The movie was not a hit at the time and Wayne thought producer Dino De Laurentiis spent too much time and money marketing his King Kong remake. But as an icon's meta last roundup it's pretty darn good, Pilgrim. The Shootist’s highest vote was a tenth place and it was on an impressive eight ballots.


The Sons of Katie Elder, North to Alaska, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, The Shootist, Two Mules for Sister Sara, and Pale Rider



Gave Meek's Cutoff a spin, wasn't that enamoured with it and was never in contention for my list. The Shootist was another on my very long list of possible watches that I just didnae get round to, not sure if I've ever watched it.

Seen: 21/44 (< Ed )
My list:  

Faildictions (yee-haw version 1.01):
56. The Raiders (1952)
55. Hud



Big Reichardt fan, this is the only one I haven't seen of hers (aside from First Cow). Seems pretty amazing though.

So far, El Topo and Pale Rider were on my list - #6 and #20 respectively.