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Life Aquatic and Darjeeling are the only ones i wasn't crazy about but i've only seen them once. Wes ranked for me:

01.Fantastic Mr Fox
02.Rushmore
03.Moonrise Kingdom
04.Bottle Rocket
05.The Grand Budapest Hotel
06.The Royal Tenenbaums
07.The Darjeeling Limited
08.The Life Aquatic With Steve Zizzou



Also really random but i came across this the other day and was a bit surprised. Scorsese had Bottle Rocket as the 7th best film of the 90s. It was in a thing where him a Ebert came up with their top tens. Their lists

Ebert:

1. "Hoop Dreams" (top ten doc)
2. "Pulp Fiction" (like it a lot but not a favourite)
3. "GoodFellas" (great)
4. "Fargo" (great)
5. "Three Colors Trilogy": "Blue," "White," and "Red" (Red is one of my favourite films, like Blue a lot, need to rewatch White only seen it once and didn't like it much)
6. "Schindler's List" (still haven't seen)
7. "Breaking the Waves" ((need to rewatch this as i said in my writeup i don't have a clue if i loved or hated this)
8. "Leaving Las Vegas" (meh)
9. "Malcolm X" (can't really remember it)
10. "JFK" (good film, i never notice the length)

Scorsese:

1. "Horse Thief" (not seen)
2. "The Thin Red Line" (my favourite Malick so far, great film)
3. "A Borrowed Life" (never heard of)
4. "Eyes Wide Shut" (need to rewatch wasn't a fan)
5. "Bad Lieutenant" (barely remember it)
6. "Breaking the Waves" (see Eberts list)
7. "Bottle Rocket" (Great)
8. "Crash" (not seen)
9. "Fargo" (great
10. "Malcolm X" and "Heat" (tie) (heat is really good)

http://www.rogerebert.com/rogers-jou...s-of-the-1990s



Moonrise Kingdom

Wes Anderson goes west with some foster parents and a son, his new love, her family, a cop, his affair with her mother, a scout leader, his troup and a whole bunch of other characters in this cascade of major catastrophic events on this otherwise minor island in the middle of god damn nowhere...

In authentic Anderson fashion, Wes dresses up his quirky characters in charismatic fashion with calculated problems to the waist line and places all of them in a place with very little space and a dose of off-shore satire and subjective humor. No one does Anderson like Anderson and his style of writing, visuals and soundtrack is super easy to identity and almost impossible to redefine or duplicate and I admire that about him. 'Moonrise Kingdom' is no different in any of these departments, but despite not being atypical Anderson, it is still the suggestive abnormal Anderson all-around, whether you like that or not.

Personally I do enjoy his works, but subjectively he is the life action answer to Miyazaki films. I sometimes find myself stuffed to the brim with sensory inputs from every direction to the point of disorientation - something that sometimes lifts the film and other times it degrades itself downwards from its own high-flying expressions. Anyways, the visuals are arguably Anderson at his most playful yet, which suits the youthful and mysterious spirit of the movie. The images are still of the familiar static nature, but the look of the actual nature combined with the colossal colorful vision of the cinematography, really makes the compact look feel grand. Anderson's cinematic style still channels the idea of a real life doll house, where Anderson can place and play around with the people of his movie exactly as he pleases and move them around organically inside this little film adaptation of his mind. The images are endlessly impressive and entertaining to escape into, where his characters either stick to the image or act as stick figures to the story.

Now that we are at the story, I love the idea of Anderson's imagination being intergrated with a younger cast and a youthful story about young love. Having the main characters take on the "camping trip of a life time" with love and luring dangers duelling in the battle of forbidden feelings, adventures and emotions is just brilliant. The story structure is tightly vowen together in the vein of the visuals, but despite of the plot constantly progressing in an almost chaotically wild and weird way, it never loses a single step - at least not in the mind of the director. Anderson seems in control of his chaos at all times and whatever he is doing might not appeal to all but it is easy to admire and respect. The writing of the dialogue is just as precise as the plot and the attention to detail is almost obsessive in nature - an element to Anderson's filmography that might frustrate some audiences and fuel others. Personally I'm equally persistent and perfectionistic with my writings, so obviously I'm very fond of his pin-point plot structure and bullet point thematic flow. Anderson might be the most fluent off-beat auteur I can recall at the moment, whatever that means, exactly.

'Moonrise Kingdom' is like a fantasy tale of factual happenings, filled with enough heart and soul filmmaking to stimulate the senses and a story simple enough to follow and a core sophisticated enough to feel. Anderson is never on the wall about the emotions of his characters and they often appear more quirky than complicated. But it isn't about the level of each element but the layering of them. The weird may first in line, but the humane lies just beneath the surface. Admittedly, Anderson is not about creating complex characters, per say, more complex worlds, but the small hints of all the hidden things is hugely rewarding when you do catch it. Some are obviously obvious and some are even played up front for laughs, like the depression of Suzy's father - but you are still given a glimpse big enough to develop the darker side of it yourself and I liked that a lot.

The humane aspect is very much alike that of a depressed stand-up comedian - a very loud and jokingly funny attitude but the cracks may show at a few occassions even if he or she will try to hide it - actually that is often the most complex state of such emotions, but they may not adapt to the screen the way we want it to. However, back to the movie, there is no doubt Anderson's movies are about the world building, quirky characters, complex writing and weirdly costructed visuals - and I got to say, despite the problems I have, most of the times I love living in Anderson's world for those 90 minutes or more.




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I liked Fantastic Mr. Fox the most, and it did well on my animation list. I'd have to go with Rushmore next, followed closely by Moonrise Kingdom, followed closely by Grand Budapest Hotel.



Also really random but i came across this the other day and was a bit surprised. Scorsese had Bottle Rocket as the 7th best film of the 90s. It was in a thing where him a Ebert came up with their top tens. Their lists

Ebert:

1. "Hoop Dreams" (top ten doc)
2. "Pulp Fiction" (like it a lot but not a favourite)
3. "GoodFellas" (great)
4. "Fargo" (great)
5. "Three Colors Trilogy": "Blue," "White," and "Red" (Red is one of my favourite films, like Blue a lot, need to rewatch White only seen it once and didn't like it much)
6. "Schindler's List" (still haven't seen)
7. "Breaking the Waves" ((need to rewatch this as i said in my writeup i don't have a clue if i loved or hated this)
8. "Leaving Las Vegas" (meh)
9. "Malcolm X" (can't really remember it)
10. "JFK" (good film, i never notice the length)

Scorsese:

1. "Horse Thief" (not seen)
2. "The Thin Red Line" (my favourite Malick so far, great film)
3. "A Borrowed Life" (never heard of)
4. "Eyes Wide Shut" (need to rewatch wasn't a fan)
5. "Bad Lieutenant" (barely remember it)
6. "Breaking the Waves" (see Eberts list)
7. "Bottle Rocket" (Great)
8. "Crash" (not seen)
9. "Fargo" (great
10. "Malcolm X" and "Heat" (tie) (heat is really good)

http://www.rogerebert.com/rogers-jou...s-of-the-1990s
And Guaporense's top 10 of the 90's:

1st. Princess Mononoke
2nd. Porco Rosso
3rd. Only Yesterday
4th. The Matrix
5th. Eyes Wide Shut
6th. Schindler's List
7th. Ghost in the Shell
8th. Satantango
9th. Dreams (Akira Kurosawa)
10th. Three Colors Red




Camo's (probably)

01.Unforgiven
02.Naked
03.My Cousin Vinny
04.Princess Mononoke (one in common Guap )
05.Goodfellas
06.A Perfect World
07.Three Colours; Red (one in common Ebert )
08.SE7EN
09.Dazed and Confused
10.Dead Man



Replaced Le Cercle Rouge with MM's nom he just sent me in the second post.

Not seen it yet but i've wanted to. Think its on Netflix so it'll be soon most likely.



Ida (Pawel Pawilikowski, 2013) Nominated By MovieMeditation



Very nice! MM...That was also a film that I've been mulling over watching, glad to see it. This is going to be a tight Hof and 1st place is up for grabs. So many fine noms



Nothing good comes from staying with normal people
Looks interesting, MM. Not on my netflix, guess I get to do some more hunting.

That's all from me tonight, guys. See you tomorrow!
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Why not just kill them? I'll do it! I'll run up to Paris - bam, bam, bam, bam. I'm back before week's end. We spend the treasure. How is this a bad plan?



Bringing Up Baby -




Haven't visited this in a while but i knew it would remain a favourite because it is an amazing film. One of the main criticisms of this is that it isn't funny. While i don't agree that it is unfunny even if it was it wouldn't bother me. I don't think it is absolutely hilarious, i don't laugh out loud much now i've seen it a few times but there's so much more i love about the movie that this doesn't matter. There's just something i love about how far out the farce goes, how this turns into a absurdly wacky adventure, i find it so fun. Everytime i return to it i have a good time. I find that Susan and David have intense chemistry, and the fact that they are polar opposites and that David does seem to have genuine contempt for Susan mixed in with his obvious feelings gives the romance a fresh and intriguing turn. I love their interactions, the witty and contemptous banter, i love the idea that someone like Susan Vance could exist. I love that the film makes me empathise with Davids feelings of annoyance towards Susan yet it somehow at the same time makes me find Susan extremely charming and endearing which is a gross contradiction but this film somehow makes it a reality for me. I thoroughly enjoy their wacky adventures and genuinely get a great sense of adventure and excitement out of them. These are just some of the reasons that me not finding this laugh a minute funny is of no importance whatsoever in my enjoyment of this film.

Susan Vance is just the best ever. I know she is often the main problem people have with the film but i don't care. She is probably my second favourite female character in film after Scarlett O'Hara. She's not exactly a progressive, positive representation a female but she is so fun and loveable and i want to marry her then divorce her a few weeks later after she drives me insane, keeping her as a friend but only on Twitter because i can only deal with her in short but delightfully nuts bursts. She is so childish, needy and actually pretty vindictive. Her fascination with David is fascinating to me, it seems to start off as a childish 'i know i annoy him so i'm going to go out of my way to do so', then of course a series of wacky circumstances forces them to stay together. I really couldn't tell you why she falls for David of vice-versa which feels so odd because i know it does come across but it is difficult to put into words why this is the case. They are somehow perfect for each other even though they really shouldn't be. David is a great character too. I've not seen a lot of Grant movies so i can't make any definitive statements but in most i have seen him he has been a cool, suave, charming character. In this he is a neurotic nerd and it is just such a welcome turn, coupled with Susan it works so well. I think Grant gives a genuinely amazing performance here, very underrated IMO. In the film he is quite frankly a dick, he is both mean and petty towards Susan but somehow i don't dislike him, i can feel his perfectly reasonable annoyance with her and just stress at all of the stuff that is and isn't happening to him. He does show genuine care for Susan but it is kept in with the spirit of the nutty story, like the moment he rushes to her home because he thinks she has harmed herself, the truth is he really shouldn't have cared, she was a stranger who he had had two unpleasant experiences with. I think he says it best himself in the middle of telling her he doesn't want to see her again "Well, i admit i'm strangely drawn to you and i don't know why" quickly followed by more put downs. Baby is such a great plot device. I adore how comfortable Susan is with what at the end of the day is an extremely dangerous Leopard with dubious origins. David reacts to it like any normal human being but he manages to come across like the weird one, mostly due to K-Heps perfect performance of a carefree person.

A legitimate criticism of this movie to me would be questioning why any of it happens. It is completely absurd. The characters intentions and actions don't make any sense. And there's really no defence for it other than, because it does. You either get enjoyment out of this madcap adventure or you feel frustrasted, i myself get immense pleasure from it.

While nowhere near as fast as His Girl Friday, the dialogue in this is similar. The everybody has a comeback and an answer to everything; noone in real life speaks like this.And i adore it. Chemistry is the key for this to work in my opinion. Some similar films or shows in my opinion like The West Wing on a bad day for example the dialogue becomes clunky mostly because the characters aren't written very well. Here David and Susan just have such a natural flow, they completely bounce off each other which makes the snappy dialogue entertaining, it works. The ending is legitimately beautiful while not betraying the absurd, screwball nature of the film. I so love how happy Susan is when he admits spending time with her is the best thing he's ever experienced. Also love that it's a bookend to the first scene of the film at the dinosaur replica except with David in a better place now he has someone he truly loves.

Anyway i hope this has explained some of my reasons for finding this a great film, no point in continuing to gush even though i happily would. Also i apologize for the weird stream of consciousness way this is, i just kept thinking of more things to say which is the mark of a great film. I recognize peoples problems with this and they are welcome to them but i don't understand them. Brilliant film.



I know I've seen Bringing Up Baby before, I just don't remember anything about it (Samurai Rebellion is in a similar boat). I skimmed through that post a bit, but will wait until after I rewatch the film to read it thoroughly. What I saw was a good write up though.



Ronin (1998)

I don't feel like I have much to say about this film. Not because it's bad by any means, but it seems to be an easily explainable film that is more or less straight forward and very well put together, yet it didn't blow me away or had multiple layers to talk about. It's a highly entertaining, well-orchestrated high-octane action thriller that does the job its been given almost to perfection. The film is filled with some nicely paced tension and calmer character moments handled by a competent director who admittedly hasn't kept up with time, which is the best and worst thing to say about this film.

I like how one critic put it... "Frankenheimer pretty much ignores everything that's happened in the action and thriller genres since 1975, and mostly that's a good thing." I would say that's spot on. 'Ronin' is a nice callback to the good old times of a simple set-up executed to great effect; a movie that's all about a simple plot device that everyone wants their hands on and off goes the plot with backstabbing, criminal master plans, foreign villains and what else can be crammed into this retro action homage. Usually I would call a film like this slick and elegant, if it's nicely executed, but 'Ronin' is a different kind of lone genre piece. The action is raw, gritty and not about filming car chases, but about following car chases. The camera is an accomplish in the plan and the actors are a player in plot - all of it feeling well balanced and never blown out of proportions.

The script does limp a little and admittedly doesn't appear as smart as it wants to be, partly because of the previous discussion of being stuck in a time where modern technology and expectations weren't on the same level. At times it even comes across as a little goofy or unintentionally amusing, but Frankenheimer clearly aims for a great ride and that 'Ronin' certainly is. This is certainly a great journey back to the barebone roots of the genre and most people should be able to at least admire that aspect of it, I would say.




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