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To kill a mockingbird

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Similarities between To Kill a Mockingbird and Of mice and men????

any ideas people?



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Well both films are set in the 1930s yet do not deal directly with The Great Depression. Still, in my opinion, the depression is simplicitly represented in both, which is a similarity.

We find similar characters in Atticus and George, both strong, wise, some say humble men.
Also similar characters in Lennie and Boo, Both physically strong yet weak minded men, who community have preconseption about.

Differences can be found in some of the themes, Loneiness is a key part of Of mice and men, the two main characters have been forced to the road for work (also shows the great depression) and only have each other, even for that they count themselves as bless, as most men dont even have 1 companion at the time. Whereas there isnt a strong feeling of loneiness in To Kill a Mockingbird, this films is based more around a community other then lonely working men.



Well both films are set in the 1930s yet do not deal directly with The Great Depression. Still, in my opinion, the depression is simplicitly represented in both, which is a similarity.
I think these two sentences spotlight a major falacy in your approach to this subject. The Great Depression didn't exist separately from the day-to-day lives of the people who experienced it. People were both poor and prejudiced, poor and dedicated, poor and black, poor and white, poor and handicapped. In fact, they didn't necessarily have to be poor. There was still a large middle class during the depression who were working hard to stay in that middle class rather than slipping into poverty. And there were people who had been well off and lost everything during that period (consider Pat Hingle as the father in Leaves of Grass]. Point I'm trying to make is that the depression wasn't just a backdrop to the other dramas--it was all a part of living from day to day, and it manifested itself in different ways and had different effects on different people.

We find similar characters in Atticus and George, both strong, wise, some say humble men.
Also similar characters in Lennie and Boo, Both physically strong yet weak minded men, who community have preconseption about.

Differences can be found in some of the themes, Loneiness is a key part of Of mice and men, the two main characters have been forced to the road for work (also shows the great depression) and only have each other, even for that they count themselves as bless, as most men dont even have 1 companion at the time. Whereas there isnt a strong feeling of loneiness in To Kill a Mockingbird, this films is based more around a community other then lonely working men.
See, this supports what I'm saying in that the depression is primarily a backdrop in those two films: Gregory Peck's 1930s lawyer in To Kill a Mockingbird is not all that different from James Stewart's lawyer in or Orson Welles' lawyer in Compulsion or Spencer Tracy's lawyer in Inherit the Wind--all of them smart and dedicated and conscientious even when they are from different periods. Lennie and Boo are strong and simple-minded and lonely and misunderstood, but so was Forrest Gump in a much later period. In other words, the depression itself has absolutely no bearing on any of these people--it's just the painted background to the action on stage. Either of the stories could just as easily been set in the1900s or the 1960s instead of the 1930s. What you really need are movies in which the depression acutally plays a role in motivating certain action or influencing a character in some way such as he lacks the money to do something he wants to and therefore must find another way of financing his plan.