Who is the last actor to blow you away with their performance?

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Al pacino in Heat and scent of a woman
Yeah, I like him in Heat. The film all round definitely had a big impact and I only saw it in full a few months ago.





Nicolas Cage in Adaptation.
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Originally Posted by Iroquois
To be fair, you have to have a fairly high IQ to understand MovieForums.com.



This might just do nobody any good.
Yeah, I like him in Heat. The film all round definitely had a big impact and I only saw it in full a few months ago.
Was that the movie that sent him down the path of "Hoo-Ha!" acting? Or was that earlier (probably more Devil's Advocate's fault). In any case, it's one that settled him.



Was that the movie that sent him down the path of "Hoo-Ha!" acting? Or was that earlier (probably more Devil's Advocate's fault). In any case, it's one that settled him.
Well he has some fantastically over-the-top stuff it's true . The reason for it in Heat apparently is that, although we don't see this on screen, Hanna uses cocaine. In general though it's been said that Pacino likes to shout occasionally to make sure we're all still paying attention .



Well he has some fantastically over-the-top stuff it's true . The reason for it in Heat apparently is that, although we don't see this on screen, Hanna uses cocaine. In general though it's been said that Pacino likes to shout occasionally to make sure we're all still paying attention .
gimme what you got, gimme what you got sort of hoo haa XD

of This lol



Was that the movie that sent him down the path of "Hoo-Ha!" acting? Or was that earlier (probably more Devil's Advocate's fault). In any case, it's one that settled him.
Earlier. Here he is in Scent of a Woman which was 1992:



Devil's Advocate is after Heat.



Earlier. Here he is in Scent of a Woman which was 1992:

Devil's Advocate is after Heat.
Yeah, I saw a bit of Scent of a Woman the other day and I was also laughing at Philip Seymour Hoffman .



Funnily enough, Eva Green. I think she's a phenomenal actress and her work in Penny Dreadful is terrifying but really brilliant.
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Jackie Chan in The Foreigner. He really did a 180, playing a somber father who loses his daughter and demands justice and when no one helps him, he takes matters in his own hands.
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Ben Stiller & Adam Sandler in The Meyerowitz Stories. Both fantastic, tragically poignant performances.



From what I saw of Krypton when it was on recently, I'd say I was really impressed with Blake Ritson as Brainiac. The whole look and sound of the character was also a big part of his success. I've been a fan of other things and you're always looking for perfection in how things are realized to me this looked pretty close .



I just re-watched for second time this month Come and See, so without any question Aleksey Kravchenko.
That was his first performance, yeah! Great filmmakers do great films with any person they come across.
I know a portuguese director that picked his actresses on the streets, Joo Csar Monteiro.



I feel like I must have overlooked Colin Farrell most of my life, but everything I see him in lately is gold. Last performance I saw was in Widows and the entire cast was excellent in that as a matter of fact.



I feel like I must have overlooked Colin Farrell most of my life, but everything I see him in lately is gold. Last performance I saw was in Widows and the entire cast was excellent in that as a matter of fact.
Me too. Recently re-watched In Bruges, which I did not appreciate the first time round. He was brilliant. And his two movies with the Greek director (The Lobster & The Killing ...) are fantastic.
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Yes, The Lobster was excellent! I haven't seen The Killing though



This particular actor is really not from the most recent time I've been blown away by an actor's performance. It's been some time since I became aware of his amazing talent. . But I''ve been 'saving up' this observation for quite some time, while looking for a place on mofo to 'put it.' So I think I'll put his name right here:

Jack Lemmon

I'd seen him in various roles, and certainly noticed him in one of my favorite comic movies, The Odd Couple. But I didn't really think of him as a great actor then. In fact, I really began to dislike Felix ( without realizing how very well Jack was doing his job there ) as a very irritating, whiny presence. And by the time Oscar threw the spaghetti against the wall, I was ready to throw Felix through it.

But when I realized Jack was truly gifted was when I saw him as Jack Godell in The China Syndrome. This is a movie that could have been just a dry quasi political doc, but with his presence, became a taut, gripping and eventually heart rending thriller. He played the part of a dedicated scientist, awakening to the ghastly realization that he is surrounded by greed, corruption and dangerous evil. Not only was this role a departure from his lighter comedic roles, he played it with grace, subtlety and authenticity. You felt you knew this guy - in fact, I have known similar men in the scientific fields, and Jack 'got it right' every step of the way.

I feel that ( at least for this viewer) to tell a larger story it is often most effective to tell it through the personal travels of a smaller, very human story. ( Which is why I find movies like La Strada or Life is Beautiful more effective and touching than all the epics about improvished struggle or the horrors of WWII put together ).

Through Jack's meltdown mirroring the atomic plants meltdown, we truly grasp the danger of all that can go wrong in our mighty, precariously balanced machines, especially in the hands of precariously unbalanced men driven by greed and stupidity. The touchstone of Jack's portrayal of an honest man , fueled by a love of science and an almost naive belief in the decency of people- lifts the movie ( and his fellow actors) to become a story as elevated and timeless as a Shakesperean tragedy.

And he did it all in the guise of an everyday
' everyman' - the type of non descript quiet guy you'd barely notice standing next to you in the bank line- until you find out he's put his life on the line to try to save the world.

Now THAT'S a talent that blows me away-no matter how many times I rewatch this movie- to this very day.