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Interestingly, I wrote the exact opposite about Lee's portrayal of The Monster (which preceded his Dracula) just two weeks ago.
And yes, this is different from the book and previous movies in much the same way that the previous movies were a departure from the book itself.
I'd be curious to read what you wrote - is it on this site somewhere?

Opposite in what respect?



Yeah, we were just referring to ones that specifically celebrated the joys of the Pre-Revisionist Western.
Oh. I still think Open Range might qualify. Maybe Appaloosa.

Or not.



Didn't you know we could just solve this problem by never, ever casting those scary minorities in anything ever.


Giving POC the "authority" position in all films and television is just doing the "uncle" from 100 years ago or the "magical" one from 30 years. You are taking a group of people and you are putting them in a specific box in the hopes that it's positive.


And frankly this is generational because while you will read in history books about white washing and black face. The agenda and intent has been around since the 70's/80's. This isn't a new idea and you say well people shouldn't be scarred. The guy that was the most successful and moving forward and changing the image of black people in america was doing that in the AM and drugging and raping women in the PM.



🥺❤️RIP Shannen Doherty❤️🥺
i really loved it, amazing cast, they did amazing job tribute to chadwick and i knew it was
WARNING: spoilers below
shuri
she did a good job as black panther like in the comics and namor gosh loved him as a villain and gonna watch it again 😍



Weird: The Al Yankovic Story -


This is one of the funniest comedies I've seen in a long time, and best of all, it's all true (according to Weird Al, anyway). It's hard to write a lot about the movie since its surprises are its biggest appeals, so I'll just say that it ably covers the most pivotal moments of Weird Al's career. They include his struggle to gain his father's affection, his struggles with alcohol abuse, a sordid love affair and...let's just say a performance on a rather notorious figure's birthday.

If this sounds like Walk Hard to you, it is similar, but if you think you shouldn't bother as a result, think again. The comedy has Weird Al's stamp all over it, especially in the reveals of what inspired his most popular parodies like a personalized package of bologna or how he pokes fun at his squeaky clean (or is it?) image. Weird Al understandably has a lot of pals, which means there is a fair share of cameos. If the Zoolander movies have taught us anything, it's that more does not always mean merrier, but I didnít find that to be the case here since each one is inspired and well-timed. Also, between the laughs, the movie manages to slip in moments that are genuinely moving, the highlights being Weird Alís speech in which he explains whatís good about being weird and any scene with his mentor, Dr. Demento (a very good Rainn Wilson). As for Radcliffe, while his casting may be in jest, he's awesome in the part, and with this performance, I'm at a point where I have to force myself to remember that he once played Harry Potter. Not all of Weird Al's parody songs are on the same level as "Amish Paradise" or "Dare to be Stupid," and by the same token, not all of the comedy in this movie sticks the landing. The moment when Weird Al claims he's abandoning parodies for original songs, for instance, isn't really paid off. The movie still stands as a worthy reminder that the comedy movie is alive and well, and what a silly, outrageous yet wholesome reminder it is.



Giving POC the "authority" position in all films and television is just doing the "uncle" from 100 years ago or the "magical" one from 30 years. You are taking a group of people and you are putting them in a specific box in the hopes that it's positive.


And frankly this is generational because while you will read in history books about white washing and black face. The agenda and intent has been around since the 70's/80's. This isn't a new idea and you say well people shouldn't be scarred. The guy that was the most successful and moving forward and changing the image of black people in america was doing that in the AM and drugging and raping women in the PM.
Sure dude, whatever you say. No weird racial insecurity here at all. Perfectly normal, sane response.




Don't you people feel like you're wasting time discussing stuff in shit movies? I don't know, maybe watch a good African film. Everybody's black in them, for the most part, so you can focus on the actual quality of the film and not some flame wars over something that will not matter a thing in your lives two days from now.



Don't you people feel like you're wasting time discussing stuff in shit movies? I don't know, maybe watch a good African film. Everybody's black in them, for the most part, so you can focus on the actual quality of the film and not some flame wars over something that will not matter a thing in your lives two days from now.
"Flame Wars" - now there's a movie title!




I enjoyed the start of this one, but it was just trying a little too hard to be cute for my taste. Cloying. Needy. And winkingly meta (trust us, we're doing this on purpose!). A cutesy attempt to recreate a vibe that the makers were never really a part of -- kind of like little kids putting on their parents' clothes. Kinda cute, but the garments don't fit and the kids only have a vague sense of the purpose and style of the clothing. Meh.



Victim of The Night
Don't you people feel like you're wasting time discussing stuff in shit movies? I don't know, maybe watch a good African film. Everybody's black in them, for the most part, so you can focus on the actual quality of the film and not some flame wars over something that will not matter a thing in your lives two days from now.
Nope. There's value to be found everywhere. My grandfather used to tell me, "When you can see the beauty in a road-side puddle, then you have become a man." Which is why I love Messiah Of Evil and also gave Trancers a pretty good review.

Also, nothing matters, so chill out.



. This isn't a new idea and you say well people shouldn't be scarred. The guy that was the most successful and moving forward and changing the image of black people in america was doing that in the AM and drugging and raping women in the PM.
Holy Cow! that took a weird turn.



Holy Cow! that took a weird turn.
I think we might need the Pudding Pop decoder ring to decipher that one.

So far all I've got is something something Bill Cosby is a rapist something something too many blacks in my movies


I'm sure if we all put our minds together to crack the code, we can do it. I just hope it doesn't turn out that Rudy and Theo are also in on this nefarious plot to replace all of our white superheros.



Sure we could focus on Siddonís racism, but I feel like we didnít laugh at him enough for posting that the new Hellraiser was too woke and that Triangle of Sadness would be attacked for not being woke.



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.

The Takeover (Annemarie van de Mond, 2022)
5.5/10
Daughter of the Nile (Hsiao-Hsien Hou, 1987)
5/10
The Return of the Scarlet Pimpernel (Hanns Schwarz, 1937)
6/10
Language Lessons (Natalie Morales, 2021)
+ 6.5/10

Mark Duplass got a year's worth of Spanish lessons from his husband, but when the latter suddenly dies, Duplass and the instructor (Natalie Morales) develop a close relationship through Zoom in this warm, honest film.
On the Line (Romuald Boulanger, 2022)
6/10
Romance Tropical (Juan E. Viguiť, 1934)
+ 4.5/10
Incarnation (Filip Kovacevic, 2016)
5.5/10
Enola Holmes 2 (Harry Bradbeer, 2022)
6.5/10

Enola (Millie Bobby Brown), the younger sister of Sherlock Holmes (Henry Cavill), gets into trouble when she tries to solve a mystery, and they try to help each other with cases they're trying to resolve.
Love in the City (Hank Orion, 2022)
5.5/10
Paradise City (John Mrco Lopez, 2019)
6/10
Carmen (Valerie Buhagiar, 2021)
5.5/10
Confess, Fletch (Greg Mottola, 2022)
- 6.5/10

Smartass investigator Fletch (Jon Hamm) is the chief suspect in multiple murders, but somehow he's able to stay out of jail and keep trying to solve the cases at which he's really rather good.
All Jacked Up and Full of Worms (Alex Phillips, 2022)
5.5/10
The Dare (Giles Alderson, 2019)
5/10
Press Play (Greg BjŲrkman, 2022)
6/10
The Woman King (Gina Prince-Bythewood, 2022)
6.5/10

Dahomey, c.1835. Warrior leader Viola Davis trains her all-female recruits to battle against an enemy which has no respect for women or their progressive way of life.
The Story Won't Die (David Henry Gerson, 2021)
6.5/10
Raymond & Ray (Rodrigo GarcŪa, 2022)
6/10
The Daughter of Dawn (Norbert A. Myles, 1920)
5/10
Medieval (Petr JŠkl, 2022)
6/10

Historical action adventure involving Czech warlord Jan Zizka (Ben Foster) and a complicated plot involving his mentor Michael Caine, Henry III of Rosenberg (Til Schweiger) and his fiancťe, Katherine, Princess of Spain (Sophie Lowe).
__________________
It's what you learn after you know it all that counts. - John Wooden
My IMDb page



There are leagues of morally ambiguous westerns.

It's the seemingly frequent misunderstanding that they were a white hat/black hat genre that led to misunderstand the moral ambiguities of something like The Searchers and thinking it was just a racist relic.
Yeah, but I think the real "white hat/black hat" aspect of The Searchers isn't so much its portrayal of Native Americans (which is still worthy of some criticism anyway, IMO), but the way that
WARNING: spoilers below
Ethan randomly decides to start being a "good guy" at the end, even though the entire film had been building itself up for a final confrontation with his own racism, a confrontation the film pretty much completely wussed out from, for lack of a better term.
Yeah, things like The Ox Bow Incident or The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance pivot entirely on questions of morality and don't always have easy answers about the "right" course of action.
But there's still very little ambiguity in Liberty Valence on who the good and bad guys were, which I think is where a lot of the moral black-&-whiteness in the genre came from.



Yeah, but I think the real "white hat/black hat" aspect of The Searchers isn't so much its portrayal of Native Americans (which is still worthy of some criticism anyway, IMO), but the way that
WARNING: spoilers below
Ethan randomly decides to start being a "good guy" at the end, even though the entire film had been building itself up for a final confrontation with his own racism, a confrontation the film pretty much completely wussed out from, for lack of a better term.

Of course there is a lot of talk that can be made of the portrayal of Native Americans in The Searchers. It is terrible, as nearly all Westerns are (as well as every movie almost ever made up until that point and long after).



And while I imagine there are elements I've long forgotten about The Searchers (I've only seen it a couple of times, and its been years since the last time I watched it), expecting a confrontation with his racism isn't the point of the film. It's not about him overcoming his bigotry. It's about him damaging himself as a result of it. Ostracizing him from his own life. He is alone at the end.



A confrontation isn't needed because sometimes a confrontation isn't needed. That doesn't mean the film wusses out. In fact, its a braver film than most westerns at the time because it at least acknowledges the ugly heart that beats inside so many of these (still) great films. It doesn't allow Ethan to ride his horrible prejudices to glory. But because so many people (wrongly) think the films view point is also Ethans, it somehow gets called out as being the most racist of golden age westerns. And, frankly, I think that assessment is beyond flawed. To the point that I don't know why it still gets any traction anymore.