A female directors thread, because why not.

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Kinda surprised we don't have one already. (P.S. do not misinterpret the previous sentence as an accusation of sexism). We don't have a lot doing worthwhile things. Bigelow gets a lot of good reviews, but does anyone compare her to Scorsese or Nolan? There are great women in directing, but because there are many times more men in the industry, the women may oftentimes get overshadowed, so let's help them out a little.


I was on Imdb looking at many "greatest foreign/international directors" lists, and Agnes Varda hardly ever came up. Kurosawa, Tarkovsky, Bergman, Miyazaki, Jackson and Fellini made it in those lists all the yime, but where's Varda? You could probably include Sofia Coppola in the cream of the crop leagues, but can she leave the same impact her father did? Maybe if Greta Gerwig releases another hit movie, she could end up there. Here's rooting for her.



Aside from those previously mentioned, some of my favourites include:


Nadia Tass (Malcolm, The Big Steal, Mr Reliable, Amy)
Jocelyn Moorhouse(Proof, Muriel's Wedding, The Dressmaker)
Gurinder Chadha (Blinded by the Light, Bend It Like Beckham, Viceroy's House)
Jane Campion (The Piano, Portrait of a Lady)
Alison Anders (Gas Food Lodging, Mi Vida Loca)
Mimi Leder (Deep Impact, Pay It Forward, On the Basis of Sex)
Sarah Gavron (Brick Lane, Suffragette, Rocks)


Recently have been impressed by a few emerging talents, of particular note Melina Moutsakis (Queen & Slim) and Stella Meghie (The Photograph), and look forward to where they go from here.



Welcome to the human race...
I'm just going to leave this here.

Anyway, "we don't have a lot doing worthwhile things" is not the best way to start a thread about female directors (much less downplaying the best-known ones by saying they're not on the same level as the best-known male directors or that they're not well-known outside the Internet).
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"Honor is not in the Weapon. It is in the Man"
Some of my favorites are:


Penny Marshall (Big, A League of Their Own)
Allie Loukas (Kathryn Upside Down)
Lexi Alexander (Green Street Hooligans, Punisher: War Zone)
Jen & Sylvia Soska (Vendetta, See No Evil 2, Rabid)
Chelsea Stardust (Satanic Panic)
Susan Walter (All I Wish)
Rebekah McKendry (All the Creatures Are Stirring)
Kao Pao-Shu (Blood of the Dragon, The Master Strikes)
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You could probably include Sofia Coppola, but can she leave the same impact her father did?
Probably? She doesnít have to have the same impact as her father. Sheís a fine director in her own right.
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In the modern age Bigelow all the way. Gerwig in a few years maybe.


Mira Nair... Is brilliant too.
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My Favorite Films



Probably? She doesnít have to have the same impact as her father. Sheís a fine director in her own right.
Agreed. Sofia has her own very unique style. I like what I've seen of her films.



I took a film school course, and all the students were male. It would have been nice to have a female perspective in the class, but maybe a lot of women are not interested in being directors as much possibly? Kind of like how whenever we work with the make up department, you will find a lot more women in that department, compared to directors?

I also noticed that there are a lot of female producers in the movie business compared to directors. Barbara Broccoli for example, produces the Bond movies, yet she always seems to want to hire male directors for the movies so far.

I want to get into directing more, and my most influential directors, Sergio Leone, Akira Kurosawa, and Fritz Lang, all happen to be male. If they were female, I would still like them just as much and my opinion wouldn't change, they just all happen to be male.

Bigalow is good cause Point Break is a really good looking well made action movie, but later she adapted the Paul Greengrass documentary type style, I don't like.



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You could probably include Sofia Coppola, but can she leave the same impact her father did?
The only movie she did that stands out with any strength in my memory is "Lost in Translation", which I thought was good. A smidgeon slow paced for my taste, but good: Has a few scenes I've thought back to over the years.
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When they have a cowboy, they want a poet.
They'll say "I don't care if he's a poet or cowboy, so long as he's a nice guy. But oh, I'm so attracted to that bad guy over there."
Understand this last part, and you'll get them all.



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Eliza Hittman is one to watch out for I think. I adored It Felt Like Love and Beach Rats and her latest film seems to been received really well at Sundance.

Second Jen and Sylvia Soska, American Mary, for all its faults, was so creative and original to me. It's stayed with me and introduced me to Katharine Isabelle too Haven't seen their Rabid remake yet but heard mixed things.

Mia Hansen Love knocked it out the park with Things to Come with Isabelle Huppert and I keep meaning to check out her other stuff, but I've never gotten round to it



Legend in my own mind
I rarely choose to watch a film based on who the director is, let alone am I influenced by their gender.

I know it is different for others, but the identity of the director is usually down the list on what would influence me as far as films go.

There are plenty of films that I enjoyed but had no idea who directed them until years later. As it turns out many of them were women.

I have noticed a few times in my life that patters have emerged in films that I have really enjoyed that had the same director. It happened with Spielberg, Scorcese, Tarantino and Kathryn Bigelow.

I want to appreciate good work regardless of the gender of those producing it.
That said, it does seem that the industry needs to do more to give female directors more opportunities.
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Do you think that maybe if females owned the scripts they would want to do, they could use that as leverage to direct more? I worked for a female director who wrote her own scripts, and got money to make a couple of them so far, but they weren't going to not invest in the movie, just because the director was going to be a woman.



I rarely choose to watch a film based on who the director is, let alone am I influenced by their gender.
Same here. Sometimes I have no idea who the director is until the movie ends.



And the foreign ones like Agnes Varda don't get a lot of notoriety outside the internet
Huh??



And the foreign ones like Agnes Varda don't get a lot of notoriety outside the internet
Huh??

I only found out about her recently, and no one I know has ever kentioned her until I brought her up on this thread. She's popular in the modern online movie community, but not like Nolan or even Bay.



I only found out about her recently, and no one I know has ever kentioned her until I brought her up on this thread. She's popular in the modern online movie community, but not like Nolan or even Bay.
The late AgnŤs Varda is a legend in French cinema. Me, Iíve never been able to finish a Christopher Nolan movie, but yesterday I watched Vardaís Vagabond for at least the 3rd time.



And the foreign ones like Agnes Varda don't get a lot of notoriety outside the internet
Huh??

I only found out about her recently, and no one I know has ever kentioned her until I brought her up on this thread. She's popular in the modern online movie community, but not like Nolan or even Bay.
So after only recently finding out about her yourself (presumably from the all the press after her recent death), you've just concluded that praise for her only, or even largely exists on the Internet ó despite her overwhelming international praise over the past several decades?



So after only recently finding out about her yourself (presumably from the all the press after her recent death), you've just concluded that praise for her only, or even largely exists on the Internet ó despite her overwhelming international praise over the past several decades?
Not to mention that praise in and of itself does not determine quality.
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