Rate The Last Movie You Saw

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Anyway, it all felt incredibly tasteless to me.
Thanks for the heads up (or down). “Tasteless” is always a dealbreaker for me.
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❤️Dominic Sherwood+Katherine McNamara❤️
Just watched it last night. It was ok, probably would have enjoyed it a lot more if I watched it in 1998. It's definitely a notch or two below the early 90s Disney animated movies. The whole time I was watching it I was picking apart what would get ripped to shreds in today's landscape which shows how lame things have gotten. I don't feel like they were making some grand stance on gender back then, just a simple you can be what you want. But now they would have too lol. Simpler times I miss.

loved animated mulan better then the new mulan.



Can’t remember if I’ve seen this or not. I like dance documentaries so have put it in my Netflix Q.



Atlantic City, 1980

A woman named Sally (Susan Sarandon) lives in Atlantic City, hoping to become a blackjack dealer. Her loser husband, Dave, and his pregnant girlfriend arrive in town so that Dave can make a drug deal with cocaine he's stolen from some very bad people. An older man named Lou (Burt Lancaster) lives in Sally's building, mooching off of an elderly widow and pining after his glory days in Las Vegas. When Dave ropes Lou into his drug deal, Lou sees the opportunity to be a player once again and to pursue his interest in Sally.
...

Mon Oncle, 1958

This is easily my favorite of the Mr. Hulot films that I've seen (though I owe Playtime a rewatch).
...
Atlantic City was a wonderful film, with all the acting being first rate. Lancaster did few comedies, but he nailed this one.

As far as the "lemon" scenes, they were obviously prurient, but I think that was the point. Sally knew that Lou was watching her, which made their lustful first meeting that much more impactful.

I can't recall if I saw Mon Oncle. I did enjoy several of the Mr. Hulot movies as a kid, but the only one I can remember is Mr. Hulot's Holiday (1953). I suspect that many comedians were influenced by Jacques Tati, not the least of which was probably Peter Sellers in his "Pink Panther" roles. I think that Tati was an expert at physical comedy.



As far as the "lemon" scenes, they were obviously prurient, but I think that was the point. Sally knew that Lou was watching her, which made their lustful first meeting that much more impactful.
I'm okay with the idea that she was engaging with some intentional exhibitionism. What I question is why we as the audience had to see it twice. The second time around there's no new context, so it feels like the scene exists just to show off her body--a "meta" motivation that distracts from the reality of the film. Her answer that she uses the lemons because she hates the fish smell seems genuine, so I still think it's dumb that she never seems to rub the lemon on her hands or arms. Also, lemon juice is very acidic--something that would burn if she had the slightest cut or blemish--and the thought of rubbing lemon juice on any of my skin makes me cringe. Her character is otherwise very real feeling and grounded, so those sequences felt like the movie had suddenly been taken over by softcore land. The first one is sort of okay because it gives you insight into how Lou sees her. The second one . . .

I can't recall if I saw Mon Oncle. I did enjoy several of the Mr. Hulot movies as a kid, but the only one I can remember is Mr. Hulot's Holiday (1953). I suspect that many comedians were influenced by Jacques Tati, not the least of which was probably Peter Sellers in his "Pink Panther" roles. I think that Tati was an expert at physical comedy.
I would definitely recommend it. The development of the family characters is really fun. There's a whole sequence with the wife installing a new garage door and the couple getting trapped inside. I liked it more than Mr. Hulot's Holiday because it felt like there was more character development, more of a story, and because I just loved the set design so much. It really makes the setting its own character--this very futuristic, manicured environment.



Freddy's Nightmares (1988)
No More Mr Nice Guy

The Show on Vhs



Sit back jack




Just getting into the spirit of things
Z For Zachariah (Craig Zobel, 2015)
+
U for unremarkable
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Almost famous for having nailed Madonna once



White King (2016)

Film about a boy and his mother living in a Dystopian community called "Homeland". The lad finds out that his father is not away working as he had been told but imprisoned for being a "traitor" to the Homeland. Good scrapes follow with the other kids in the community and attempts to contact/help the father through his parents (High up in the Homeland pecking order) and a corrupt lesbian General (Greta Scacchi!).

For its budget this does a great job and' whilst a bit simplistic, the characters are all believable and it carries its story strongly.



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Richard Jewell (2019) -

Pink Floyd: Live at Pompeii (1972) -

Saraband (2003) -

The Man Who Would Be King (1975) -

Sympathy for the Devil (1968) -

Contagion (2011) -

Intacto (2001) -
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I absolutely LOVE Intacto.

I know that the
WARNING: spoilers below
blindfolded run through the forest
gets a lot of attention (and deservedly so!), but I think the whole film is filled with memorable moments and images.






This was a fascinating case, even more so than Son of Sam or Zodiac. DeAngelo and his rape/murder crime spree story is compelling enough, but add to it McNamara's dogged monomaniacal quest to sleuth him out and to help solve the case makes the documentary I'll Be Gone in the Dark (2020) captivating viewing.

It's a 6 episode series about the East Area Rapist/murderer serial killer, aka "The Golden State Killer", who raped 50 women and killed 12 in the 1970s-80s. It's well directed by Liz Garbus from a book by Michelle McNamara , an amateur sleuth. It's on HBO and other streaming services.

What amazes me is that DeAngelo evidently quit his crime spree in the mid 1980s, and was captured in 2018. What did he do for almost 40 years? Some of the answers were in the last 2 episodes, including his marriage and fathering children!

Looks like the drugs McNamara was taking enabled her to have Herculean energy to keep up her quest, but in the end caused her death. What a tragedy all around. Makes you wonder if the cops would ever have got the guy, absent her work.

Women may enjoy this production more than many men, although it held my rapt attentions for all 6 episodes.

Doc's rating: 7/10






This was a fascinating case, even more so than Son of Sam or Zodiac. DeAngelo and his rape/murder crime spree story is compelling enough, but add to it McNamara's dogged monomaniacal quest to sleuth him out and to help solve the case makes the documentary I'll Be Gone in the Dark (2020) captivating viewing.

It's a 6 episode series about the East Area Rapist/murderer serial killer, aka "The Golden State Killer", who raped 50 women and killed 12 in the 1970s-80s. It's well directed by Liz Garbus from a book by Michelle McNamara , an amateur sleuth. It's on HBO and other streaming services
I started listening to the CaseFile podcast about his crimes and I had to stop after the first episode because I was just so frustrated at the repeated incidences of women telling people (their husbands, the police) about strange things like seeing or hearing people in the house, or break ins, having it ignored or blown off, and then them being attacked.

I've been meaning to read the book and I saw that it was turned into a mini-series. I'll be looking for it to hit a service I have.

You might also be interested in the miniseries on Netflix called Unblievable. It's about a woman named Marie who reports an assault, but the police don't believe her and (through threats and intimidation) get her to say that she made it up. Later, two partners investigate a series of attacks that eventually connect back to Marie. It's a pretty compelling story, and the original newspaper article (which won a Pulitzer) is also worth reading.



The Mission: Impossible movie marathon continues...

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE
GHOST PROTOCOL
(2011)

First viewing. This is the most exciting entry in the series so far. The action scenes, storyline, and Tom Cruise's insane stunt (one where he scales Burj Khalifa, the tallest building in the world) were badass.
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Just getting into the spirit of things
The Last Blitzkrieg (Arthur Dreifuss, 1959)
+
Slightly offbeat war movie that's sadly more of a damp squib than any major assault on the senses



Professional horse shoe straightener
My Summer of Love 2004
Interesting to see early Pawel Pawlikowski directing a young Emily Blunt. It's a decent film with some lovely moments but nothing earth shattering.



A Man Escaped 1956
The best Bresson I've seen yet. The best escape movie I've seen yet.



Long Day’s Journey Into Night 2018
Incredible film-making. Bi Gan was just 29 years old when he started making this film. What a complete bastard. It's esoteric, ethereal, dream like and other worldly. The plot is almost indescribable because explaining the way last hour of the film is presented would give it away, but it's basically about a man revisiting old memories in a bid to search for a lost lover. As with Bi Gan's 'Kailli Blues', the camerawork is ingenious, presumably with the shots taken from an array of drones, motorbikes and more. Extraordinary film.



El sur 1983
Very beautiful film, Similar themes and tone to Erice's 'Spirit of the Beehive' but with a bit more depth to character relationships. It's a sad film but the striking use of light and shadows, in an almost Caravaggio type way (as with 'Beehive') is just mesmerizing. A Spanish classic.



Las Acacias 2011
Lovely understated South American drama about a man who tries to reconnect with society after picking up a woman and child, during one of his long distance lorry journeys.



Once 2007
An extremely soppy, sentimental film with terrible music and a predictable, laughable plot. Possibly one of the worst films I have ever seen. Maybe it's just not my bag.