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No matter what anyone says, you must have some kind of interest in Ingmar Bergman to watch this movie. The two female leads are very good. Tim Roth looks like heíd rather be someplace else - miscast. Not bad, but not sure I understood the entire plot.
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Madhouse (1981)
aka There Was a Little Girl

A slasher that's kinda aptly named as its story makes little sense. It has its moments, some silly and some not. A nice atmosphere during the first hour. One of the tamest video nasties I've seen this far.
I liked this film quite a bit more than its reputation and consider it among the better non-Italian giallo underdogs (alongside Happy Birthday To Me and the Killer Is One of 13). It's certainly the best from Assonitis that I've seen, even though I do much enjoy Tentacles and Beyond the Door.





Poster says it all. The conspiracy IS real.
I actually watched this and am frankly shocked anyone else has. My choice was one of those, "Four people and I got outvoted" ones. Otherwise there was nothing tempting about the cast, plot etc. Eckhart is game and fills the screen with tics and squints and mumbling and emoting. But you're right about Jones. He turns in a Bruce Willis special.



I actually watched this and am frankly shocked anyone else has. My choice was one of those, "Four people and I got outvoted" ones. Otherwise there was nothing tempting about the cast, plot etc. Eckhart is game and fills the screen with tics and squints and mumbling and emoting. But you're right about Jones. He turns in a Bruce Willis special.
I watched based purely on the leading cast, nothing more. And I agree 100% with what you said.
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Rather good movie. Original storyline. Jodie Foster gave 200%. Peter Sarsgaard also very good.





Rather good movie. Original storyline. Jodie Foster gave 200%. Peter Sarsgaard also very good.
You should check out The Lady Vanishes, which is a clear inspiration. Everyone rips off Hitchcock at some point





Rather good movie. Original storyline. Jodie Foster gave 200%. Peter Sarsgaard also very good.
You should check out The Lady Vanishes, which is a clear inspiration. Everyone rips off Hitchcock at some point
It's kind of like The Lady Vanishes meets Bunny Lake is Missing (which I would also recommend).



CringeFest's Avatar
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The Guilty (2021)





What a strange movie, very well done with intense acting and great ending music...I felt there was a lot missing but still...





Computer Chess, 2013

A group of eccentric computer programmers meet for an annual tournament in which their chess-playing programs go head-to-head to see whose program will dominate. Along the way there are discussions about artificial intelligence, bizarre encounters with a spiritual group staying in the same hotel, and unsettling interactions with one program that seems to have ideas of its own.

I grappled mightily with this film, which had a lot of elements that I liked but also some challenging aspects that made it a hard watch for me at times.

On the positive side, the look of the film---black and white and with a "video" look---effectively evokes the early mass computing era that it is trying to portray. I would also say that the actors do a good job of portraying characters with recognizable "nerd mannerisms" that manage to feel like real people as opposed to caricatures.

The film parcels out its more dramatic moments. One of them actually made me gasp a bit, and I wish that there was more directly disturbing/unsettling stuff in the movie. If you've seen the film, I'm talking about the part where the programmer is interacting with the program, asks it "Who are you?" and in reply the program
WARNING: spoilers below
flashes an image of a sonogram with a audible heartbeat before going dark
.

Overall the comedy was a bit hit-or-miss for me. The quirky spiritualists clashing with the nerds wasn't a dynamic that I loved. And the part where a swinging couple tries to recruit a young programmer for a threesome just made me cringe a bit.

I also wish that the cast had been a little smaller. The characters are, with very few exceptions, white men in a similar age range with a similar style of dress, haircuts, glasses, and even similar mannerisms. With few exceptions, there were not many strong personalities, and so keeping track of who was who proved tricky at times. There is a funny running bit about the only woman programmer at the conference, a shy young person who only seems to get more flustered as she is repeatedly put on the spot about her attendance.

This is a film that I watchlisted when it originally came out. It is definitely a different movie experience, but one that I didn't love as much as I hoped I would.







Dodge City - The word most frequently used in describing this 1939 western starring Errol Flynn and frequent onscreen collaborator Olivia de Havilland is lavish. And it is. Filmed in eye-catching Technicolor with plenty of grandiose set pieces. The vibrant colors actually triggered one of my pet peeves. It's admittedly a minor one but whenever an old time western (or any other costume epic for that matter) features splashes of bright primary colors it goes a ways towards taking me out of the moment. I find it hard to reconcile that such colors were readily available in any period piece. It's a small quibble and I suppose if a studio invests the money for the Technicolor process they're gonna want to take it for a spin.

Anyway, Flynn plays Wade Hatton, an adventurer and world traveler who happens to be earning his living as a drover and cattle agent bringing a herd up to the wild and lawless town of Dodge City, Kansas. De Havilland plays Abbie Irving, accompanying the herd on a wagon train with her troublemaking brother Lee. He gets drunk, starts a stampede and Hatton is forced to wound him in the leg and he promptly gets trampled by the cattle. That of course leads to the usual love/hate relationship that these types of plots depend on with Abbie resentful of Hatton and treating him coldly. Until, of course, she warms to him and his raffish charms. Nothing trailblazing I'll admit but since they're both such immensely likable performers they get the usual pass.

They make it to Dodge City and find the town in the viselike grip of ruthless and greedy Jeff Surrett (Bruce Cabot) and his gang. Never ones for subtlety they've run off the last sheriff and boarded up the office and jail. Following the tried and true formula of a reticent hero being spurred into action by outrage and tragedy, Wade witnesses the death of an innocent bystander. It takes place during one of the many spontaneous shootouts that erupt on any given day. This led to another eye rolling moment for me. The death involves Abbie, who is escorting a wagonload of kids to a church picnic. I found the scene unintendedly laughable starting with the use of what were plainly mannequins or wooden dummies sitting in for the kids. But what really got me was the victim being played by notoriously hammy kid actor Bobs Watson as little Harry Cole, the distressingly precocious son of one of Surrett's previous victims.

This was directed by Michael Curtiz, an old hand who would frequently crank out five or six of these movies a year. He probably could have done this one in his sleep and was responsible for several of Flynn's previous movies. As for the set pieces there's an extravagantly destructive saloon brawl to end all saloon brawls and the grand finale and showdown probably had audiences on the edge of their seats back in the day. Yes, it's predictable but as far as old-fashioned spectacle and good guys squaring off against bad guys it gets the job done.

85/100




Jeanne Dielmann


A middle aged prostitute goes about her day doing boring things until she snaps and kills a client.


Worst movie ever made, a pretensions bore of a film and not worth the second viewing I gave it.



Victim of The Night
...Bunny Lake is Missing (which I would also recommend).
You had me at Noel Coward.




Jeanne Dielmann


 



Worst movie ever made, a pretensions bore of a film and not worth the second viewing I gave it.
How about deleting the spoiler? I intended to watch this.



"Jackie Brown"

First rewatch in a few years. By far, still Tarantino's best.
Hell yes; it has the most character development, the thing that always gives Tarantino's movies their actual substance, which is why a lot of the movies he's done since have let me down, since they've often been so lacking that department. I mean, I think the one scene where Max talks about
WARNING: spoilers below
how he decided he wanted to quit being a bondsman while waiting all night for a guy in an apartment that smells like cat pee
has more character development than the entire 2 & 1/2 hours of Basterds.