A scary thing happened on the way to the Movie Forums - Horrorcrammers

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Alright, I'm tackling the Hooptober list on Letterboxd which has a list of criteria and this is what I came up with:

Films released on my birth year:

The Boogens (1980s)
Dark Night of the Scarecrow (US)

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2

Get Out

Thoughts?
I will particularly be looking forward to your thoughts on these.



There's a few good ones from '73 that I'd recommend over these. Or did you choose these for a reason? (availability?)

I'll just throw these out there in case one of them works for you.


The Iron Rose


Lemora: A Child's Tale of the Supernatural

Dark Night of the Scarecrow >>>>>>>>> The Dark Knight


You were supposed to watch this two years ago when the rest of us did. Until you rectify this we will all secretly think that you're less cool than we are.
I also like The Iron Rose a lot, cheers.
And y'all know I love Lemora.
Of course you're correct on the Darks.



...Instead, Wan snorted the ashes of Lucio Fulci and said "what if horror had more parkour?"
Yup, I'm in.



Oh yeah, I remember you telling us about that before, thanks.
I'm all for people having library cards and using library services, even if it's just to watch movies.



On my Jesus Franco journey, The Awful Dr. Orloff was OK, easily the best he's done so far. Much better direction and acting.


What in the actual ass happened to him?



Watched Dementia 13 for the first time this morning, and recognized a frame from Wooley's quiz. I hereby award myself one belated point.
You got it.



James Wan's Malignant is simply wonderful. It's befuddling, campy, Gonzo, hyper-violent, stylish and bananas filmmaking that Hollywood usually avoids like the plague in order to not alienate audiences. Instead, Wan snorted the ashes of Lucio Fulci and said "what if horror had more parkour?"
Wonderful wasn't the term that popped into my head while watching Malignant. It was like Wan gathered all the films of his childhood, put them in the blender, added silly-looking CGI in galore, and turned the whole mess into a bland tribute. I guess the biggest value it has is the potential to interest the modern audience of the "source material."

Oh, and I didn't hate the film. It was just heartbreakingly mediocre, and it saddens me if it's the "befuddling, campy, Gonzo, hyper-violent, stylish and bananas filmmaking" of today.
__________________



Wonderful wasn't the term that popped into my head while watching Malignant. It was like Wan gathered all the films of his childhood, put them in the blender, added silly-looking CGI in galore, and turned the whole mess into a bland tribute. I guess the biggest value it has is the potential to interest the modern audience of the "source material."

Oh, and I didn't hate the film. It was just heartbreakingly mediocre, and it saddens me if it's the "befuddling, campy, Gonzo, hyper-violent, stylish and bananas filmmaking" of today.
I can see calling this film many things but bland and boring. He essentially decided to make a throwback to Argento, Fulci, and Hennenlotter on a 10 mil budget without dialing back any of the campiness or audacity that comes with the territory.

Be sad if you want. I'll continue enjoying things.



Wonderful wasn't the term that popped into my head while watching Malignant. It was like Wan gathered all the films of his childhood, put them in the blender, added silly-looking CGI in galore, and turned the whole mess into a bland tribute. I guess the biggest value it has is the potential to interest the modern audience of the "source material."

Oh, and I didn't hate the film. It was just heartbreakingly mediocre, and it saddens me if it's the "befuddling, campy, Gonzo, hyper-violent, stylish and bananas filmmaking" of today.

If you take out the, "Oh, and I didn't hate the film," that sounds like every Crumbsroom review of any James Wan film I've ever read.



Looking forward to Malignant since horror movies rarely scare me anyway, and I love gonzo.


Watching the Hills Have Eyes. Stopping just to say that it's another grand exercise in how a lacking plot can sometimes make a movie more scary. It's Wes Craven's mix of slow building and frantic thrills that does it this time.



There's a few good ones from '73 that I'd recommend over these. Or did you choose these for a reason? (availability?)

I'll just throw these out there in case one of them works for you.

the obvious ones:
Exorcist
Don't Look Now
The Wicker Man

personal faves:
Theater of Blood
The Iron Rose
Don't Be Afraid of the Dark
Frankenstein: The True Story
Lisa and the Devil
Attack of the Blind Dead aka Return of the Evil Dead
Vault of Horror
Tales That Witness Madness
Lemora: A Child's Tale of the Supernatural

and there's also The Legend of Hell House, which I have loved and not loved at various points in my life. But it has a following.



Dark Night of the Scarecrow >>>>>>>>> The Dark Knight


You were supposed to watch this two years ago when the rest of us did. Until you rectify this we will all secretly think that you're less cool than we are.
Sorry. I've never considered myself cool though. But Final Exam will be a done deal this year.

I've seen the obvious 1973 ones. Of the others, wouldn't mind tackling Theater of Blood. It looks a bit insane with Vincent Price as a hammy actor and Diana Riggs in it as well? Probably will replace Werewolf with that. At least Screaming gets me the connection to Peter Cushing.

Good, glad you liked Scarecrow. Heard good things about it.



If you take out the, "Oh, and I didn't hate the film," that sounds like every Crumbsroom review of any James Wan film I've ever read.

If only James Wan was clever enough to use a blender. Usually he just wraps all of his influences up in shrink wrap until they run out of oxygen and die.


That said, while I definitely hate Saw and Insidious, I don't hate Conjuring. It's passably watchable. It just attract my ire because of how much it seems to impress the horror community, and it makes me feel that maybe possessing some kind of observable soul isn't essential for so many fans of the genre.



Going to letterboxd, filtering by 1981 + horror, and then going down by popularity, it looks like the next four films for me would be: My Bloody Valentine, The Prowler, Happy Birthday to Me, and Madman.


Kind of surprising I never saw the first and third listed as I feel like I've heard their names a lot when growing up.
I've seen Valentine and thought it was above average. The smalltown life in Canada feels real and they did a good job building on the history and dread.

Haven't seen any of the others. I may have Madman recorded on VHS and perhaps I should consider it instead of Don't Go In the Woods? I'll think about it.



I will particularly be looking forward to your thoughts on these.
Oh dear, the pressure is on now.



Oh dear, the pressure is on now.
Yup.
You better have thoughts.
*cracks knuckles*



If only James Wan was clever enough to use a blender. Usually he just wraps all of his influences up in shrink wrap until they run out of oxygen and die.


That said, while I definitely hate Saw and Insidious, I don't hate Conjuring. It's passably watchable. It just attract my ire because of how much it seems to impress the horror community, and it makes me feel that maybe possessing some kind of observable soul isn't essential for so many fans of the genre.
Crummy, please watch Malignant. Do it for good ol' MKS. I'll watch something of your chosen (assuming it's easily available on streaming)



Watched Dementia 13 for the first time this morning, and recognized a frame from Wooley's quiz. I hereby award myself one belated point.
Similarly, I just watched Night Moves and hey, I was right about it being Gene Hackman. Just couldn't figure out what movie.

Great flick.



I've seen Valentine and thought it was above average. The smalltown life in Canada feels real and they did a good job building on the history and dread.

Haven't seen any of the others. I may have Madman recorded on VHS and perhaps I should consider it instead of Don't Go In the Woods? I'll think about it.

Oh, I was just looking because, while being vaguely aware of Hooptober over the years, I've never participated, and that got me wondering what I'd do for the '81 requirement if I were to do it.


Possession was an '81 movie. If you haven't seen that and can find it playing, I'd recommend it.


Otherwise, from my exchange with Rock and Crumbs, it sounds like Don't Go Into the Woods is the movie I think it is, and while I don't remember much of it, I do remember it was a lot of fun (and laughter) with the crowd I watched it with. So I'd suggest leaving it in.