Make Your Picks

The 75 best looking films ever made

Tools    





The Grand Budapest Hotel is a blind spot for me. I have seen every other Anderson flick, but not this one, which seems to be many people's favorite...
Watch it! and post back your thoughts here. Grand Budapest is truly a riot of colors, images and creativity. I'm betting you'd like it.



We've gone on holiday by mistake
Can't remember why to be honest.
Think I said I like Marmite.
__________________



Professional horse shoe straightener
No. 74:

‘Shane' (1953)
Director: George Stevens
DoP.: Loyal Griggs



Loyal Griggs captures the Wyoming scenery very well in Shane. It may not be the best Western ever made but it's certainly one of the best looking. The sparse landscape with mountains and sweeping plains really helps muster up an isolated atmosphere for the viewer while some of the indoor action is just as well filmed.



Professional horse shoe straightener
No. 73:

'Lost In Translation' (2003)
Director: Sofia Coppola
DoP.: Lance Acord



Coppola and Acord together manage to capture the city as a character. It melds the into the platonic relationship of the two main characters and just sits there as a backdrop to these lost souls realizing they are lost. It's a really beautiful film that really strikes a chord, and would be nothing without the dreamy bokeh and lovely lights fizzing in and out of the shot.



No. 74:

‘Shane' (1953)
Director: George Stevens
DoP.: Loyal Griggs



Loyal Griggs captures the Wyoming scenery very well in Shane. It may not be the best Western ever made but it's certainly one of the best looking. The sparse landscape with mountains and sweeping plains really helps muster up an isolated atmosphere for the viewer while some of the indoor action is just as well filmed.
I love Shane. And the last shot is one of the greats for me.



No. 74:

'Lost In Translation' (2003)
Director: Sofia Coppola
DoP.: Lance Acord



Coppola and Acord together manage to capture the city as a character. It melds the into the platonic relationship of the two main characters and just sits there as a backdrop to these lost souls realizing they are lost. It's a really beautiful film that really strikes a chord, and would be nothing without the dreamy bokeh and lovely lights fizzing in and out of the shot.
That is a good-looking movie.



Professional horse shoe straightener
No. 72:

‘The Master' (2012)
Director: Paul Thomas Anderson
DoP.: Mihai Malaimare Jr.



Mihai Malaimare Jr's photography in The Master is a stunning example of a Paul Thomas Anderson film captured beautifully on 65mm. Lots of blue in the colour palette, depth of field changes and amazing shots of the ocean. The images match the performances, Phillip Seymour Hoffman and Joaquin Phoenix at their imperious best. One of those films I personally never get tired of watching clips from.



A system of cells interlinked
I am due for a re-watch on Lost in Translation, which I haven't seen since I say it theatrically when it first hit. I've not seen The Master.

As far as Shane is concerned, I own a copy, and I am a big fan of the film. And for the record, Pale Rider, which is sort of a loose adaptation of Shane, is one of the few Eastwood picture I don't care for.

Shane has some great shots, and even though the kid annoys the hell of of some people, I don't mind him.
__________________
"There’s absolutely no doubt you can be slightly better tomorrow than you are today." - JBP



Professional horse shoe straightener
No. 71:

‘The White Ribbon' (2009)
Director: Michael Haneke
DoP.: Christian Berger




Powerful black and white images force the viewer to look at what Haneke is putting infront of us. He's a master at making the audience uncomfortable about the images we are seeing on screen and this is no exception - we are faced with a community where someone is performing spiteful acts on others. Haneke says there is as much evil in us, as there is good. It may or may not be a nod to the rise of the Nazis in Germany, but Christian Berger's photography is stunningly utilized.



Professional horse shoe straightener
No. 70:

‘Kill Bill Vol. 1'
Director: Quentin Tarantino
DoP.: Robert Richardson



Of all of Tarantino's films, Kill Bill Volume 1 looks the most satisfying. Possibly because the photography is so varied, mainly due to the terrific locations used. Volume 2 is only slightly behind but that amazingly captured Beatrix v O-Ren fight in the snow seals it. Also, as usual the pace of the editing in Tarantino's films is stylish and noticeable. Really compliments the direction. A visual treat.






A system of cells interlinked
It's been a long time since I watched the Kill Bill films. Probably need to get back to those sometime soon. I remember enjoying them quite a bit back in the day.



Some nice choices to start

The Grand Budapest Hotel is visually quite gorgeous, sadly the kid irritates me far too much to enjoy Shane but that's not what this list is about and it's certainly shot nicely. Didn't get through Lost In Translation when we tried to watch it and have never revisited it (I've not seen a Sofia Coppola offering yet that I've really enjoyed tbh) so can't comment on that one, maybe one day I'll give it another try. The Master has some lovely cinematography in it, as does The White Ribbon (I do like me some nice crisp b&w imagery) and although I've not watched either Kill Bill for a number of years (really must give them another outing sometime) I remember them having some lovely use of colours and being pleasant enough on the eye.

Looking forward to seeing what else might pop up.
__________________
201620172018201920202021+
NomsPre-1930 Countdown


Mumble is awful!



No. 70:

‘Kill Bill Vol. 1'
Director: Quentin Tarantino
DoP.: Robert Richardson



Of all of Tarantino's films, Kill Bill Volume 1 looks the most satisfying. Possibly because the photography is so varied, mainly due to the terrific locations used. Volume 2 is only slightly behind but that amazingly captured Beatrix v O-Ren fight in the snow seals it. Also, as usual the pace of the editing in Tarantino's films is stylish and noticeable. Really compliments the direction. A visual treat.



You saw Lady Snowblood?