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I won't dance. Don't ask me...
Actually the film and TV adaptations are probably fresher in my mind now. I've just been thinking about Rik Mayall doing George's Marvellous Medicine – bizarrely controversial at the time – as well as the more obscure film of Danny, the Champion of the World.
Dahl isn't too popular in Poland. Only thanks to movies such as Charlie and chocolate factory or Matilda children have opportunity to know Dahl's books. it's too bad, coz he was an extraordinary writer.



Dahl isn't too popular in Poland.
That's surprising – what are the most well-received things over there?

Only thanks to movies such as Charlie and chocolate factory or Matilda children have opportunity to know Dahl's books. it's too bad, coz he was an extraordinary writer.
The Witches is great as well. They could stand to make a new version of that story I think.



I won't dance. Don't ask me...
[quote=SeeingisBelieving;1825509]That's surprising – what are the most well-received things over there? [quote]

Harry Potter. Harry Potter is the most well-received in whole wrold I guess.

They could stand to make a new version of that story I think.
That's true, but prefer the book. The movie has changed ending. When I'm reading The Witches I always cry in the end.



[quote=Ms. M;1825565][quote=SeeingisBelieving;1825509]That's surprising – what are the most well-received things over there?

Harry Potter. Harry Potter is the most well-received in whole wrold I guess.
Yes I imagine so .

That's true, but prefer the book. The movie has changed ending. When I'm reading The Witches I always cry in the end.
Oh yes, that's right. He keeps a lot of darkness around, it's not always comfortable .



When I'm reading The Witches I always cry in the end.
This is one of the best books. It absolutely holds up as an adult as well while some of Dahl's other books don't, Fantastic Mr Fox for example which was my favourite as a child.

Really love the film too, should watch that again at some point.



I won't dance. Don't ask me...


Oh yes, that's right. He keeps a lot of darkness around, it's not always comfortable .
Yep, that's true. Dahl's books aren't sticky.

This is one of the best books. It absolutely holds up as an adult as well while some of Dahl's other books don't, Fantastic Mr Fox for example which was my favourite as a child.

Really love the film too, should watch that again at some point.
I wrote this before in another thread, but I ran away from cinema when I was a child, when Anjelica Huston took of the mask and the wig



I wrote this before in another thread, but I ran away from cinema when I was a child, when Anjelica Huston took of the mask and the wig
She was fantastic wasn't she? Mai Zetterling too.



I won't dance. Don't ask me...
She was fantastic wasn't she? Mai Zetterling too.
She was embodiment everything what is frightening for children
Both were great Good and bad witches.





Excellent dystopian book. Would make a great movie.
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I'm in the middle of reading Roald Dahl's Book of Ghost Stories and really enjoying it. It's an anthology of tales chosen by Dahl but not including his own work. As you'd expect he really knows his stuff .

These are the stories I've read so far, with ratings:

W. S. by L. P. Hartley — 5/10
Harry by Rosemary Timperley — 8/10
The Corner Shop by Cynthia Asquith — 6/10
In the Tube by E. F. Benson — 6/10
Christmas Meeting by Rosemary Timperley — 5/10
Elias and the Draug by Jonas Lie — 6/10
A few more ratings of stories from this collection. I'm in the doldrums at the moment as the last two were nowhere near as good, so I can see why they were put in the middle. The first however is the best one so far:

Playmates by A. M. Burrage — 9/10
Ringing the Changes by Robert Aickman — 2/10
The Telephone by Mary Treadgold — 4/10



A couple more from Roald Dahl's Book of Ghost Stories. Things have certainly picked up, especially with another A. M. Burrage story. I'm definitely going to be seeking out more of his work because he is the man .

The Sweeper by A. M. Burrage — 8/10
On the Brighton Road by Richard Middleton — 5/10



I'm Anthony, a Frenchman in France.
Here's the latest book (?) I've read:



My rate: 6/10

A pretty boring and predictable story. I've borrowed that book from my English teacher. That has at least been the opportunity for me to learn English words I didn't know.



I won't dance. Don't ask me...
Here's the latest book (?) I've read:



My rate: 6/10

A pretty boring and predictable story. I've borrowed that book from my English teacher. That has at least been the opportunity for me to learn English words I didn't know.
I wasn't aware that Goscinny wrote Asterix. The same guy who wrote Le Petit Nicolas:

This one is read by students in primary schools in Poland obligatorily.



I'm Anthony, a Frenchman in France.


That book in English (I'm French) is an American friend's present. She's a "past life regressionist" (but not only). I usually see her once a year in Paris.

I don't quite agree with the conceptS of reincarnation. They only partially inspire me a bit. I try not to anthropomorphize too much (unlike many people into reincarnation, in my opinion).

My American friend knows my own view on reincarnation and she knew I would enjoy reading that book.
To make it simple: to me, it does not really matter whether a "past life memory" is related to something that really happened or not. To me, what matters the most is how those surfacing informations help heal/fix our present life.
For example, I don't care about someone claiming they were a now-deceased POTUS. But I'm interested in how their reincarnation exploration has helped them heal/fix their present life.

Also, I enjoy reading that English (I'm French): a good level of English. I practice while reading, I learn new words without being blocked too often while reading. That influences much my rating, which I find really hard to define - but you get the idea



I'm in the middle of reading Roald Dahl's Book of Ghost Stories and really enjoying it. It's an anthology of tales chosen by Dahl but not including his own work. As you'd expect he really knows his stuff .
I've just finished the book and here is the complete list of stories with ratings:

W. S. by L. P. Hartley — 5/10
Harry by Rosemary Timperley — 8/10
The Corner Shop by Cynthia Asquith — 6/10
In the Tube by E. F. Benson — 6/10
Christmas Meeting by Rosemary Timperley — 5/10
Elias and the Draug by Jonas Lie — 6/10
Playmates by A. M. Burrage — 9/10
Ringing the Changes by Robert Aickman — 2/10
The Telephone by Mary Treadgold — 4/10
The Ghost of a Hand by J. Sheridan Le Fanu — 6/10
The Sweeper by A. M. Burrage — 8/10
Afterward by Edith Wharton — 3/10
On the Brighton Road by Richard Middleton — 5/10
The Upper Berth by F. Marion Crawford — 4/10



Started another anthology book this week, Murder Under the Christmas Tree.

My ratings for the first three short stories:

The Necklace of Pearls by Dorothy L. Sayers — 6.5/10
The Name on the Window by Edmund Crispin — 6.5/10
A Traditional Christmas by Val McDermid — 6/10