Personal Recommendation Hall of Fame VI

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The trick is not minding
It really was a great film to start with.
I also found it very interesting how Christais depicted as taking two showers in the film, both right after she has betrayed herself and her ethics, but both against her will. She feels a need to clean herself afterwards.



The Lives of Others is a fantastic film. Unfortunately I think I've written so much about it in the past that my mind is drawing a blank on what I can say about it now. I'll just thank you for sharing your personal connection instead.



All About Eve is my favorite Bette Davis film and every performance in the film is spot on perfect. Usually a movie has a line or two that you can remember, as it's just a little better than everything else but in Eve there are SO many great lines picking a fav is almost impossible. I think this is one of the top ten best written movies.

Didn't like Dead Man or Alphaville but I did finish Dead Man. Goddard is not for me. I couldn't get through Breathless either. I'd rather watch the Valerie Kaprisky-Richard Gere version of Breathless again and that's a bad movie.

Lives of Others was good, apparently. I don't remember much about it but I liked it enough right after watching it to give it a 4/5.

Black Narcissus is a watchlist movie and is one I started but never finished and when I say started I think I watched the opening credits.

Have watched half of Once Upon a Time in America, thought it was good but haven't gone back to finish it. It's my Moby Dick of movies. Something I've started several times but never seem to finish.

Haven't seen any of the others but The Madness of King George is on one of my watchlists and I know I started it once but was like, nah, not in the mood for this right now. I then probably loaded up some Ted V. Mikels film so I could sit in a duuhhhh state for about 90 minutes.



Amazing write-up Wyldesyde! I did not dislike anything at all about The Lives of Others, but I didn't get a lot out of it either. It's one of those times that I suspect that I may have failed the film. Definitely one I should see again.



The world doesn't owe you a damn thing
Happens to me all the time that I watch a movie and I'm still not sure if I've seen it or not, or maybe even just seen bits of it at one time...
Did that a little over a month ago with Day of the Outlaw. Kept wondering through the first two-thirds how familiar it looked. Realized that I DID see it and, realizing I could not remember the ending, finished it off. lol
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What I actually said to win MovieGal's heart:
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Did that a little over a month ago with Day of the Outlaw. Kept wondering through the first two-thirds how familiar it looked. Realized that I DID see it and, realizing I could not remember the ending, finished it off. lol
I even knew you watched that one But only because I remember it was in a Western HoF...But like you I can't remember how it ended, heck I can't remember much other than it had Tina Louise...I hope it had her, I'm just posting this from memory.



I've finished The Best Years of Our Lives. There was a single scene I had seen before, at the start in the plane when Homer lights the matches for everyone. We must've touched on that in one of my classes or something. That was the only one though, thankfully haha.



I've finished The Best Years of Our Lives. There was a single scene I had seen before, at the start in the plane when Homer lights the matches for everyone. We must've touched on that in one of my classes or something. That was the only one though, thankfully haha.
I love the beginning the most



The world doesn't owe you a damn thing
I even knew you watched that one But only because I remember it was in a Western HoF...But like you I can't remember how it ended, heck I can't remember much other than it had Tina Louise...I hope it had her, I'm just posting this from memory.
That was the funny part that, along with Robert Ryan and Burl Ives, it was a MustSee! for Tina Louise, having never seen her in a serious role - or thinking I hadn't the second time watching it lol. Excellent western. The forgetting is purely a fault of the viewer



That was the funny part that, along with Robert Ryan and Burl Ives, it was a MustSee! for Tina Louise, having never seen her in a serious role - or thinking I hadn't the second time watching it lol. Excellent western. The forgetting is purely a fault of the viewer
The same year that she made Day of the Outlaw, she also made another excellent western, The Hangman. What I like about The Hangman is that Tina Louise has a large and pivotal role in the movie and it's an excellent western too. Geez I should watch both again! Actually I was trying to work on watching movies in her filmography but as usual I got side tracked and haven't gotten back to that yet.



The world doesn't owe you a damn thing
I haven't seen Jaramusch's Dead Man since it premiered, and do imagine I would have a far greater appreciation, these decades later, on a rewatch of this cinematic poem.
LOVE this line in your review, Phoenix: The stark photography often reminds me of a stark skeletal beauty - a moonscape littered with rocks and death, but one that never looks ugly or decomposed.

My experience with Goddard is nearly nonexistent, with the meandering thoughts of Pierrot le Fou and Alphaville is one of three films (Band of Outsiders and Vivre Sa Vie) that I'm most interested in getting a stronger sense of Jean-Luc.
Though, after reading this,
I love Godard, but Alphaville is one of his weakest films. I've seen 17 Godard films, and Alphaville would be in the bottom 3. I still rated it a 6/10, though.
with ALL the amazing films you've chosen for me that I've been endeared to, I would be tickled by a rainbow of colors if you'd do the pleasure of sharing your thoughts.

I have not seen All About Eve since I was like thirteen and have forgotten SO MUCH I've been tempted to uncheck it on my List. Or better still, just [email protected] watch this again. lol

I watched Wolf Children (2012) today. This was a good pick for me because I like animated films and I like cute children that look like wolves. Also, I look like a wolf myself most of the time. I enjoyed this quite a bit. The animation is beautiful and really well done. The character design is cute and the characters are interesting and likeable. It was a nice story and told in an effective way. There are some wonderful, lovely scenes and delightful moments. Somewhat surprisingly, this is the first film I have seen by Mamoru Hosoda. I will have to check out more of his stuff. My guess is that Cricket picked it for me. And if it wasn't Cricket, then it was likely Citizen Rules. Or CosmicRunaway. Or someone else. Anyway, good pick. Glad I watched it.
That line just put a BIG FAT grin on my face.
I was giddy when I saw this nominated for you and had hoped you'd enjoy it as you did. I've sadly only seen this once and fell in love with it.




The Madness of King George (1994)

I really enjoyed watching The Madness of King George. My wife liked this movie too which is also a bonus as we always watch movies together. Luckily we have very similar taste in movies

Unlike Cricket, I do love period piece dramas especially about British royalty. I like seeing the palace intrigue, the historical sets and the amazing costumes and if it's a PG-13 film all the better. I've seen a lot of movies about the British Royals and documentaries too. I've even seen Helen Mirren in The Queen (2006) twice...but I'd not heard of The Madness of King George before, so very happy to see it chose for me.

I won't analyze every aspect of film making here as to me what stood out was an interesting story based on historical facts and those amazing sets & costumes. I dig that women in the royal court wore those giant gray wigs and looked good too!

Fun movie!


I knew I had a slam dunk when I found this one for you. YAY!! Need to see this one again.

Quite the beautiful review of The Lives of Others, my friend @Wyldesyde19. As CR stated, reading personal experiences within these reviews is wonderful. Thanks for sharing. Truly.
I saw The Lives of Others in an HoF, which of them I cannot find, but I do remember the chill I felt watching this. A sense of intimacy, coldly violated. Incredible film.



The world doesn't owe you a damn thing
The same year that she made Day of the Outlaw, she also made another excellent western, The Hangman. What I like about The Hangman is that Tina Louise has a large and pivotal role in the movie and it's an excellent western too. Geez I should watch both again! Actually I was trying to work on watching movies in her filmography but as usual I got side tracked and haven't gotten back to that yet.
I'll have to look into that one. THANKS.
I feel your pain, I've wanted to see more of Greer Garson after seeing her in Mrs. Miniver this early and haven't.





The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)
Directed by: William Wyler

Starring: Dana Andrews, Fredric March, Harold Russell

Centred around the troubles faced by veterans returning home from war, The Best Years of Our Lives only briefly touches on how it was society who failed these men, and instead focuses on the soldiers' own individual perseverance and fortitude. Because of that, the film is able to maintain a feeling of optimism, despite otherwise not shying away from realistic reintegration issues, particularly those of Homer, who lost both of his hands during duty.

There are three distinct, yet intertwining stories featured in the film. Each man comes from a completely different walk of life, and has their own problems to face when returning from combat. Despite living in a smaller town, they likely never would have met if it weren't for the plane ride home. It shows how much of a levelling field the war was for different social classes, as the poorest man was the most decorated, and the youngest among them, who still had so much of his life to look forward to, lost the most.

A number of scenes are shot in a rather interesting manner, with background actions being just as important as those close to the camera. The smaller, more realistic sets sometimes gave a feeling of claustrophobia, which was effective at conveying similar feelings felt by the characters on screen. All of the performances were great, and for an untrained actor, Harold Russell was especially remarkable. His story was really the heart of
The Best Years of Our Lives, while also providing a link to keep the others together. It was an outstanding film, and I appreciated how well it handled its drama without becoming overly sentimental.

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The Best Years of Our Lives is a great film. I would rank it as Wyler's 3rd best film, out of the 9 I have seen.



I'll probably watch Underground tomorrow. I'm on vacation all this week so I have extra time for more movies.



...The Madness of King George (1994)
I knew I had a slam dunk when I found this one for you. YAY!! Need to see this one again...
I had thought maybe it was your choice for me, but my best guess would've been Thursday Next. Good thing I didn't guess as I would've been wrong...again