Rate The Last Movie You Saw

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Bad Santa (2003)


Another comedy that I love more than most people I suppose, and I think the sequel was actually underappreciated as well (though likely unnecessary). The story actually carries some emotion, but the jokes are obviously the focus of the movie, and the cast all deliver splendidly. Watching some of the behind the scenes stuff mentions the Coen brothers actually did a script version of this movie as well?....



Doctor Strange (2016) - 82/100


It still has some cringy jokes and dialogue that come with being a Marvel movie, but the plot moves along smoothly, Strange has a solid character arc, and the action scenes are fun and imaginative. They're not just generic punchups, there's manipulation of space and gravity, characters phasing through walls, flipping the scenery upside down, and so on. It's all very trippy, but possible to follow. Overall, it's my new favourite Marvel movie, hands down.




BLUE CHIPS
(1994)

First Viewing. Underrated sports comedy drama. Nolte carries the movie and delivers an explosively great, at times funny, and captivating performance. It's a shame he has never won an Oscar.

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“Let me tell you something you already know. The world ain't all sunshine and rainbows. It's a very mean and nasty place and I don't care how tough you are, it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it. You, me, or nobody is gonna hit as hard as life. But it ain't about how hard ya hit. It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward. How much you can take and keep moving forward. That's how winning is done!” ~ Rocky Balboa



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.

Abel (Diego Luna, 2010)
6/10
Devil's Night: Dawn of the Nain Rouge (Sam Logan Khaleghi, 2020)
4/10
A Shot in the Dark (William McGann, 1941)
5/10
Mouchette (Robert Bresson, 1967)
6/10

What Moucette (Nadine Nortier) sees is violent and strange.
Rey (Niles Atallah, 2017)
6/10
Murder Is My Beat (Edgar G. Ulmer, 1955)
+ 5/10
7 Semanas (Constanza Figari, 2016)
6/10
Zeroville (James Franco, 2019)
- 5.5/10

The naive dreamer James Franco is.
Duvidha (Mani Kaul, 1973)
5/10
Bodyguard (Richard Fleischer, 1948)
6/10
Postmark for Danger (Guy Green, 1955)
5/10
Easy Lessons (Dorottya Zurbó 2018)
6/10

Teenage Somali refugee Kafiya studies and waits in Hungary to see if she will be accepted into the EU.
They Only Kill Their Masters (James Goldstone, 1972)
5.5/10
Your Highness (David Gordon Green, 2011)
5/10
Mad Holiday (George B. Seitz, 1936)
5.5/10
Genocide (Arnold Schwartzman, 1982)
7/10

The intro to the powerful documentary.
Run with the Hunted (John Swab, 2019)
5/10
South of Suez (Lewis Seiler, 1940)
5.5/10
Let it Burn (Maíra Bühler, 2019
5/10
Perdita Durango AKA Dance with the Devil (Álex de la Iglesia, 1997)
6/10

Incredibly sick and twisted Rosie Perez and Javier Bardem have too much power over certain people.
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My IMDb page



Something that I love about Do the Right Thing is that one the handful of occasions that I've disagreed with someone about an aspect of the film, it's always been a really good conversation. Solid performances, and also it manages to be general and specific at the same time. I liked many of Lee's films over the years, but Do the Right Thing is probably my favorite of his.



As I mentioned in my full review, I've always been hot and cold with Spike Lee...I'll like one film and hate the next, but I think Do the Right Thing is his masterpiece.



Eyes Wide Shut (1999)

Haven't seen this since its original release. As far as I can remember it still has the same effect on me, the performances are good but the story is slight. The idea of the marital couple with unresolved trust issues is very well played by Cruise and Kidman. I also liked his crosstown wandering and encountering of different situations in his role as a doc and disgruntled husband. Late night New York looks quite enticing in this film!

All in all, glad I watched it again and would probably mark this the same as I would have 21 (yikes!!!) years ago:




Welcome to the human race...
Animal Crackers -


imagine watching this and thinking "I'm going to name a murder clown after the protagonist"
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Two Heads Creek




Pretty fun. You can tell whatever budget they had was spent on gore, and that they had a lot of fun. It just took a while before said gore happened. And the acting while, not terribly awful, can't carry the movie enough without the bloody bits.

Here's the trailer for those who can't see the poster (it shows for me but no other posters work and for some reason can't upload it either)






The Two of Us (1967)

A little boy named Claude lives in Paris with his parents during WW2, but the family is Jewish and his parents are afraid of what will happen to him. Claude is thus sent to stay with the parents of family friends in the countryside. The elderly couple, called Pepe and Meme, do not know that Claude is Jewish and hold some anti-Semitic beliefs.

There are a lot of movies out there about prejudice/bias, and many of them take the same basic structure: two people are forced to work/live together and as they learn more about each other they come to appreciate one another's culture.

This is decidedly not how The Two of Us chooses to approach the topic. Claude is given a crash course in Catholicism before he leaves home, and his hosts never suspect that he is Jewish. The film instead makes its point by demonstrating the gap between the biases that people hold and how they actually come to feel about those people in reality.

The film displays this point in multiple ways. Perhaps the most obvious is the subplot of the rabbits. Pepe is a former soldier and your typical "grumpy old man". Pepe is also . . . a vegetarian. Why? Because he loves the rabbits, he knows the rabbits, and he cannot eat them.

As the film goes on, Claude quietly and attentively listens as Pepe lectures about "the Jews". In perhaps my favorite sequence, Claude freaks out because he "must be a Jew", and then Pepe takes him in front of a mirror and explains to him all the reasons why he cannot be Jewish--the straightness of his nose, the lack of curly hair. Suddenly, a wide-eyed Claude points out that Pepe has a hooked nose and curly hair and runs to tell Meme that Pepe is Jewish. Under Claude's gentle questioning, Pepe's biases repeatedly show that they are illogical.

The movie isn't about Pepe learning a lesson or changing his beliefs. Instead it's about understanding that Pepe's perception of the Jewish people comes from what he hears on the radio and old cultural biases. He has a Jewish person in his household, and unabashedly comes to love and treasure him. Pepe's biases come from ignorance, not hate. At the same time, though, it's easy to see how his biases are harmful. Pepe believes that the War is the fault of the Jews. And when he talks about them as being a "greedy" people, there is an undertone of suggesting that they've brought troubles on themselves. It is possible for someone to be a loving and caring person, and yet to have prejudices that cause harm to others.

On even a third allegorical level, the film devotes a chunk of time to Claude's treatment at the local school. He is routinely picked on by the other students for being different. In a harrowing scene, he is punished by the headmistress by having his head shaved. The response in watching these scenes is "someone should do something!", and Pepe reacts strongly to Claude's despair. As the nation frets about involvement in the war, the film poses the question of what one should do in the face of injustice.

Overall the film is incredibly well-acted, especially Michel Simon as Pepe. The dynamics between the characters are very real feeling, in particular the grumbling-but-loving banter between Pepe and Meme. The film exists in a very specific place and time, but I think that its message about empathy, understanding, and prejudice is universal.




Something that I love about Do the Right Thing is that one the handful of occasions that I've disagreed with someone about an aspect of the film, it's always been a really good conversation. Solid performances, and also it manages to be general and specific at the same time. I liked many of Lee's films over the years, but Do the Right Thing is probably my favorite of his.
I agree, Do the Right Thing is amazing. It hits a lot a "grey" areas that leave the viewer open to discussion. And since the film really leaves you at the mercy of your own interpretation, there's a lot of room for dialogue. It's a 5/5 for me last I checked.
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Imagine an eye unruled by man-made laws of perspective, an eye unprejudiced by compositional logic, an eye which does not respond to the name of everything but which must know each object encountered in life through an adventure of perception. How many colors are there in a field of grass to the crawling baby unaware of 'Green'?

-Stan Brakhage



Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid (1982):
I watched this film both due to recently buying it and Carl Reiner's passing. I thought it was hilarious and was both a parody/love letter to 40's detective films with a very authentic feel, Don't talk about the cleaning woman though.
9/10
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“What about me, what about Raven?”
Raven



Eyes Wide Shut (1999)



Late night New York looks quite enticing in this film!
As someone who lived a decade in Manhattan, I am still amazed that all the New York outdoor scenes were shot on a set.
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As someone who lived a decade in Manhattan, I am still amazed that all the New York outdoor scenes were shot on a set.
Really? I thought all the New York outdoor scenes looked incredibly phony...I expected better from Stanley Kubrick



Really? I thought all the New York outdoor scenes looked incredibly phony...I expected better from Stanley Kubrick
I think that look was intended. As Martin Scorsese pointed out, (and I'm paraphrasing), "It's New York in a dream..."



Psycho (1960)






I'm a little ashamed to admit I've never seen it before but I was impressed and thoroughly enjoyed it. Such a bold move to kill off the main character halfway through. The shower scene is legendary and rightfully so. Great performances, particularly by Perkins as Bates. Some genuinely creepy moments, especially the reveal of his mother at the end.


An iconic classic.


4/5 Stars.