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What is name of the vaccination? Is it effective?
Johnson & Johnson is the one-dose. I presume itís effective.
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Iím here only on Mondays, Wednesdays & Fridays. Thatís why Iím here now.



^ Yep that is the one. Apparently it's 85% effective.


If this helps, I have to get routine bloodwork every 3-4 months. I'm also not good with needles, and of course, for bloodwork they have to hit a vein and then keep that needle in there for about a minute to get all the blood they want.

But this vaccine is intramuscular, meaning they simply jab you with a tiny needle (it was tiny compared to the bloodwork needles!) and within seconds you're outta there! VERY easy even for this needle-phobe.
It's not really anything like that, don't have a problem with the needle going through, it's the fear of air bubbles being missed in the syringe that always sends me into a panic even though I've always been told it's very rare but it's the main worry of injections for me.

My dentist once showed me how much air was needed in the syringe to cause trouble but it's an irrational fear of mine unfortunately.


Thank you though, the size of the needle you mentioned was good to hear.



The Adventure Starts Here!
Thank you though, the size of the needle you mentioned was good to hear.
For me it was a short, short needle, and reeeeeally thin! And I literally didn't feel anything at all. She was putting the Band-Aid on before I had time to get out a sentence of greeting.



Just remember: no matter which vaccine you get these are designed, according to studies, to give 100% coverage from the more serious effects of the virus (hospitalization/death), so donít get too wrapped up in the efficacy numbers.

I got emailed about Pfizer/Moderna vaccine pop ups this week, but Iím waiting for another J&J pop up. I have no interest in going through the madness twice.

And air bubbles in syringes is more of a problem with stuff going into your veins. Obviously bubbles are not good in vaccines (it messes with the dosage), but since they are injected into muscle the risk of an air bubble causing a complication is so low that youíre more likely to be hit by a bus.



I know that officially the school's still out... but most scientists & doctors (but not all, depending what side of the political aisle they are on) currently believe that once fully vaccinated: "Can't Get It - Can't Spread It!"

Do you agree?



The Adventure Starts Here!
I know that officially the school's still out... but most scientists & doctors (but not all, depending what side of the political aisle they are on) currently believe that once fully vaccinated: "Can't Get It - Can't Spread It!"

Do you agree?
I hadn't heard this--the "can't spread it" part. Of course that would be a huge bonus, but I hadn't heard this from experts. They're still recommending that vaccinated people wear masks in public, aren't they?



I know that officially the school's still out... but most scientists & doctors (but not all, depending what side of the political aisle they are on) currently believe that once fully vaccinated: "Can't Get It - Can't Spread It!"

Do you agree?
This isn't a political question, it's a scientific one.

And everything I have read basically says that they are unsure at this point. The main testing on the vaccines has been whether it keeps you from getting sick, but you can still get infected with it, which potentially means you can still spread it.

I'm not sure I agree with your assertions about most scientists saying it can't be spread. What are your sources? Because most of what I'm reading is along these lines:

ďThe vaccine is very effective in preventing symptomatic disease,Ē said Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security in Maryland.

ďBut is it effective at preventing asymptomatic disease? Thereís an open question about how much the vaccine is going to decrease transmission. It will take time to do those studies,Ē he told Healthline.


Or this: [i]What is the a-prior likelihood that the vaccines reduce spread? Pretty high. These vaccines work by provoking an antibody response that will attack the virus before it has a chance to produce a serious infection. Efficacy is therefore tied to reduced viral load, which in turn will affect how much virus is shed by infected individuals, and therefore how contagious they are. The real question is Ė how much do the vaccines reduce spread? It would be surprising if they didnít reduce spread at all. But it is theoretically possible that they do not reduce spread sufficiently to change pandemic recommendations for mask wearing and social distancing[i]

So until I hear from an authority that I trust that being vaccinated means I am very unlikely to transmit (and not just less likely to transmit), I plan to keep wearing a mask in public and around anyone who is not vaccinated.

Like, my chickens are vaccinated against Marek's, but that just means it won't kill them. They can still easily transmit it to (and kill) unvaccinated birds.

I am hopeful about statements like this, Those caveats in mind, the coronavirus spreads most effectively through things like coughing and sneezing, so even just reducing symptomatic cases of the disease seems likely to slow the spread. Recent data have suggested that even one dose of the vaccine can drastically reduce viral infections. There is no reason to believe vaccines won't reduce transmission rates; it's just a question of by how much.



From most of the research Iíve seen they are saying that people who are vaccinated wonít ever get a viral load high enough to be a carrier.



From most of the research Iíve seen they are saying that people who are vaccinated wonít ever get a viral load high enough to be a carrier.
That would be amazing.



I go for my second vaccine tomorrow. I got the Pfizer one three weeks ago. My arm was really sore for a few days after but no other side effects and I don't think it was any worse than when I've gotten other vaccines like flu or tetanus. Fingers crossed I have a similar outcome with the second one.

My brother got the Moderna one and he felt really sick the day after his second dose. It passed really quickly though. Both of my parents have had both of their vaccines (my dad got the Moderna, not sure which kind my mom got), but both of them only had sore arms both times.



I go for my second vaccine tomorrow. I got the Pfizer one three weeks ago. My arm was really sore for a few days after but no other side effects and I don't think it was any worse than when I've gotten other vaccines like flu or tetanus. Fingers crossed I have a similar outcome with the second one.

My brother got the Moderna one and he felt really sick the day after his second dose. It passed really quickly though. Both of my parents have had both of their vaccines (my dad got the Moderna, not sure which kind my mom got), but both of them only had sore arms both times.
Yeah, this is the main reason Iím waiting for the J&J vaccine. Iíve heard from too many people about being wiped out after the Pfizer/Moderna shots, especially the second one. Iíve got a history of reactions to vaccines, and Iím on my feet running around too much.

My mom and sis got the J&J, and I didnít hear a single compliant from them. Also, and this is going to make me sound nutty, I am not cool with the carbon emissions tied to the cold chain storage for Pfizer/Moderna.



Also, and this is going to make me sound nutty, I am not cool with the carbon emissions tied to the cold chain storage for Pfizer/Moderna.
I don't think it's nutty at all. I've seen a huge increase in single-use stuff and waste since the pandemic began.



@Takoma11: Yeah, Iíve been wondering of late if the cold chain storage and transport of the vaccines is expending enough GHG (green house gases) to offset the drop we saw when everyone was ordered to stay at home.

That would make for an interesting study. Someone should get on that.



Gonna be stuck like a pin cushion on Friday
I have a vision of millennials asking ďWhatís a pin cushion?Ē



Bahahahaha!

Iím one of them rare cultured millennials.
There are some YouTube videos of kids trying to figure out how to use a rotary phone. I get a kick out of those.

I wonder if the movie "Dial M for Murder" means anything to younger audiences - since very little technology today has dials.



There are some YouTube videos of kids trying to figure out how to use a rotary phone. I get a kick out of those.

I wonder if the movie "Dial M for Murder" means anything to younger audiences - since very little technology today has dials.
Yeah, there are times where I have conversations with some of my peers and Iím just like ďhow can you be this stupid?Ē. I have to remind myself that my parents were much older when they had me, so I got the advantage of all their worldly knowledge from another time. A couple of my friends also had older parents so we click pretty well and reflect on how worldly educated we are because of it.

I ainít an ageist because of it, so thatís definitely a good thing.