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Life as a shorty shouldn't be so rough
@Allaby

I chose films you haven't marked as seen on Letterboxd, so hopefully these are all fresh options for you.

Choice one: Ramrod (1947) by Andre de Toth because even though I don't know how you feel about westerns, I think this is a film that works well for people who might not necessarily be into westerns. It's got noir elements, which work really well in the western genre.

Choice two: The Cranes Are Flying (1957) by Mikhail Kalatozov because it is on the shortlist of most beautiful films of all time.

Choice three: The Sacrifice (1986) by Andrey Tarkovsky because it'll help you get closer to checking off the entire Tarkovsky filmography, which might just be the best filmography ever. It's not near the best Tarkovsky, but it's still really gorgeous and interesting.



@cricket I only have one movie for you because you're so well watched, but it's a good one and you haven't seen it (I'm pretty sure). I thought about this film for the longest time for you. I almost nominated in an HoF but the video quality is poor. I do have a link to the best copy on the internet.

Days of Wine and Roses (1958)
78 minutes *not the Jack Lemmon remake version


If that doesn't work or you've seen it, let me know and I'll come up with 2 others, but I think it will be to your liking.



Green Room (2015)

A punk band gets into trouble after playing a gig in a neo-nazi bar. That concept has troubled me for as long as I knew about this film. Why are these punkers performing to their arch enemies? Well, seems that it may actually be an integral part of the film's statement. At least to me, it feels that Saulnier wants to give the finger to ideologies and idealists in general. His punkers are posers who take the neo-nazi gig and hide their real selves behind an angry facade. It's the same on the other side as well. Green Room's people wear their dogmas as masks and believe in nothing.

As an entertainment, Green Room is mediocre. I was expecting a wilder and more extreme film. It takes a long time to get going, and to some degree, the climax never happens, and the film goes out with a whimper. It's disappointing how most of the nazis just leave. There's a promise of a bloodbath, but it's never truly fulfilled. It's not bad as it is, but there's a mismatch between the grindhouse plot and regular action-thriller execution.

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Allaby's Avatar
Guy who likes movies
@Allaby

I chose films you haven't marked as seen on Letterboxd, so hopefully these are all fresh options for you.

Choice one: Ramrod (1947) by Andre de Toth because even though I don't know how you feel about westerns, I think this is a film that works well for people who might not necessarily be into westerns. It's got noir elements, which work really well in the western genre.

Choice two: The Cranes Are Flying (1957) by Mikhail Kalatozov because it is on the shortlist of most beautiful films of all time.

Choice three: The Sacrifice (1986) by Andrey Tarkovsky because it'll help you get closer to checking off the entire Tarkovsky filmography, which might just be the best filmography ever. It's not near the best Tarkovsky, but it's still really gorgeous and interesting.
I haven't seen any of those. They all sound great. I'm going to go with The Cranes are Flying. I've heard a lot of good things about it and have been meaning to watch it for a while now. Thanks for the excellent recommendations! I will post my recommendations for you shortly.



Allaby's Avatar
Guy who likes movies
@jiraffejustin

Here are my recommendations for you:

Córki dancingu/The Lure (2015) I recommended this before for someone else. It is a fantastically bizarre and wonderfully weird Polish horror/musical about mermaids that a lot of people haven't seen.

Born to Kill (1947) An underrated, entertaining film noir directed by Robert Wise

Sophie's Place (1986) This is an obscure, animated film that it seems almost no one has seen. It only has 25 total votes on imdb. It doesn't have a normal narrative story line and has a lot of interesting symbolism and imagery. I found it really enchanting and fascinating.

Hopefully, one of these captures your interest. Happy viewing!



Allaby's Avatar
Guy who likes movies
I just finished watching The Cranes Are Flying (1957), suggested by my new friend @jiraffejustin. Masterfully directed by Mikhail Kalatozov, this excellent film is about two young lovers separated by war. The cinematography is very beautiful and the performances are great, especially by the lovely Tatyana Samoylova. I had heard a lot of good things about this film and had been wanting to see it for a while, so I'm glad jiraffejustin recommended it. I was not disappointed. The Cranes Are Flying is a must see film and I would definitely recommend it to anyone here who has not yet seen it. My rating is



@cricket I only have one movie for you because you're so well watched, but it's a good one and you haven't seen it (I'm pretty sure). I thought about this film for the longest time for you. I almost nominated in an HoF but the video quality is poor. I do have a link to the best copy on the internet.

Days of Wine and Roses (1958)
78 minutes *not the Jack Lemmon remake version


If that doesn't work or you've seen it, let me know and I'll come up with 2 others, but I think it will be to your liking.
I've seen the Lemmon version but this is unfamiliar to me. I'll most likely watch it tomorrow night.

Your Choices-
Woman in the Dunes, my favorite of the 3 and on the 60's list
The Swimmer, 60's list
The Spirit of the Beehive, 70's list



The world doesn't you owe you a damn thing
I will be getting my review posted, but first I will get my three suggestions for @John Dumbear posted first.

Since you didn't have a watchlist on Letterbox or almost nothing on the Lists here, which I would guess is simply because you haven't delved into it. So I looked to your top ten as well as movies you gave a 3 or better stars to get a general idea on Letterbox. There seems to be an enjoyment of the slightly quirky, dark comedy and I read how you love 70s Westerns though a lot are hit and miss. I also bounced about the recent Countdown to see your responses to certain films and whether you saw them or not.
Here is what I came up with--

RocknRolla (2008) A relatively unknown, early Guy Ritchie film that you may get a kick out of.
The Final Solution: The Wannsee Conference (1984) Did not see this, but did see that you commented that it was on your Watchlist, so. . .
The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) I have tried, on multiple cases, to try to get into Wes Anderson and this, THIS, is the shining exception that I continually rewatch and love. The quirky comedic aspects just might be up your alley, should you not have seen this already.
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What I actually said to win MovieGal's heart:
- I might not be a real King of Kinkiness, but I make good pancakes
~Mr Minio



Life as a shorty shouldn't be so rough
@Allaby

I'm glad you liked Cranes! I haven't made my decision on which one of yours to watch, I'll make the choice after I finish up La Dolce Vita. I'm leaning towards Sophie's Place.



28 days...6 hours...42 minutes...12 seconds
@TheUsualSuspect

Dust Devil (1992) - a bit dreamy horror with some resemblance to Fulci. Again, Final Cut (108 min) is highly preferred

Brimstone (2016) - a bleak, biblical western that borders on horror

Freaks (2018) - I don't want to say much about this for fear of spoilers. It's one of my favorites from 2018, though

Seen some of Brimstone and am interested in Dust Devil, but will go with Freaks.



I will be getting my review posted, but first I will get my three suggestions for @John Dumbear posted first.

Hi, new friend! I'll suggest some films in the next day or two. We just added legalized sports betting here. Now I'm busy crushing through some college basketball.



Life as a shorty shouldn't be so rough
I was finally able to finish La Dolce Vita. I'm having a hard time with the rating, because I know part of the experience wasn't really related to the film. I mean, I guess the runtime isn't my fault, but I did choose to watch the three hour film. I didn't have three straight hours to dedicate to the film, so I had to watch it in chunks. The early part of the film wasn't necessarily inspiring me to keep going, because the idea of the three hours was daunting early on. It's a technically brilliant film, so there was always going to be a high floor for La Dolce Vita in my eyes. It felt every bit of the three hour runtime, but there were segments that really, really worked for me. The party that Nico took Marcello to felt Bunelian, which works for me. I probably would have enjoyed the film more if the rest of the film was this absurd. The absurdity probably would not have worked for the Steiner scene that followed, but I was asking for a different movie all together with my desire for Bunuel-style Fellini. I can't sleep on the technical brilliance of this film, even though I wasn't gripped all the way through.



...Your Choices-
Woman in the Dunes, my favorite of the 3 and on the 60's list
The Swimmer, 60's list
The Spirit of the Beehive, 70's list
Those all look like really good choices and I'd like to see them all.

But I'll go with The Swimmer.



I can't remember, you like Lancaster?
I do...In fact just now I thought of a Lancaster film that might be to some people's liking. I better go make a note before I forget it.



The world doesn't you owe you a damn thing
Hi, new friend! I'll suggest some films in the next day or two. We just added legalized sports betting here. Now I'm busy crushing through some college basketball.
Crush away!
No worries.



Born to Kill (1947)....I love classic American film noir 40s-50s. I've not seen that one but with Robert Wise direction it sounds pretty darn good.
You know I love those films too. You gotta see this one. It's pretty sick. That Lawrence Tierney was something else: cold blooded.