MoFo Movie Roulette

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I love dark comedy, not so much for horror. Love twistyness in my film. For my new partner, only going off your top ten.


1. "The Hospital" ('71 - Hiller) One of my fave dark comedy/drama
2. "The Goddess"('58 - Cromwell) One I discovered during being shut down by COVID. A nice find.
3. " Four Lions"('10 - Morris) Best comedy of the decade. I love it!



@Allaby

I love Sullivan's Travels (1941) Veronica Lake is always a blast to watch and Joel McCrea is someone I can relate to...he kinda reminds me of me!

The Marrying Kind (1952) I think I seen this years ago. George Cukor is a director whos filmography I need to explore more.

My choice is: The Naked Island (1960) I've really enjoyed the mid 20th century Japanese films I've seen, so this one sounds very much to my liking.

Thanks for such a nice selection I hope I can do you justices with my choices and I'll get them up pronto.



Hi Citizen Rules! I don't have any types of movies I dislike. I'm willing to give almost anything a shot. I like classics and new films, independent and big budget blockbusters, films from all over the world. I enjoy a good comedy, a fun action movie, a well made drama, a thrilling horror, or an entertaining musical that makes me want to sing and dance. I don't mind kids or family movies. I can appreciate an entertaining cult or B movie. Just follow your heart your when recommending to me and I will be cool with that. I will have recs for you shortly.
Sounds like you enjoy all types of film, so I'll serve up a smorgasbord

A Town Like Alice (1956)

Fiddler on the Roof (1971)

A Night to Remember (1958)






Allaby's Avatar
Guy who likes movies
Sounds like you enjoy all types of film, so I'll serve up a smorgasbord

A Town Like Alice (1956)

Fiddler on the Roof (1971)

A Night to Remember (1958)



I've seen Fiddler on the Roof and really liked it. I haven't seen the other two. I'm going to go with A Night to Remember. Thanks for the quality recommendations.



28 days...6 hours...42 minutes...12 seconds
I love dark comedy, not so much for horror. Love twistyness in my film. For my new partner, only going off your top ten.


1. "The Hospital" ('71 - Hiller) One of my fave dark comedy/drama
2. "The Goddess"('58 - Cromwell) One I discovered during being shut down by COVID. A nice find.
3. " Four Lions"('10 - Morris) Best comedy of the decade. I love it!

I'll try The Hospital.




After Hours - dark comedy


Predestination - twisty film.


Sorry to Bother You - Black history month, film is written, directed and starring black artists.



For you-

Boys Don't Cry (1999)
Top 10 favorite material for me and based on a true story. On the directed by women list.
Huh? Not exactly the film I was expecting after you hinted it's from your disturbing films list. I haven't seen it though, so it's a working choice.
__________________



I've seen Fiddler on the Roof and really liked it. I haven't seen the other two. I'm going to go with A Night to Remember. Thanks for the quality recommendations.
Happy watching Allaby



Huh? Not exactly the film I was expecting after you hinted it's from your disturbing films list. I haven't seen it though, so it's a working choice.
It's on that list, but they're not all on it for the same reason.



Allaby's Avatar
Guy who likes movies
My new friend @Citizen Rules recommended A Night to Remember (1958). Directed by Roy Ward Baker, this drama tells the true story of the sinking of the Titanic. It features a wonderful ensemble cast including Kenneth More, Ronald Allen, Robert Ayres, Honor Blackman, Anthony Bushell, John Cairney, Jill Dixon, amongst others. This was a really well made film. The actors all did a good job and the dialogue was intelligent and believable. The film is compelling and engaging, with some very effective and moving moments. A Night To Remember is the best of the Titanic films that I have seen . My rating is
.



The world doesn't you owe you a damn thing
Let's see if I can give you something good @edarsenal

Choice one: Pather Panchali (1955) by Satyajit Ray because I saw that you didn't have it checked off in your lists and because I think it is a
film

Choice two: Obsession (1976) by Brian de Palma because I just watched it and I enjoyed it a lot. It's over the top at times, it completely apes Hitchcock and Vertigo, but it's a fun piece of filmmaking that felt fresh to my modern eyes.

Choice three: I, Tonya (2017) by Craig Gillespie because it is a bold movie that takes an historic moment in time and delivers it to you from a perspective you might not have considered when it happened, plus it's pretty funny
THANKS JJ!
One and two DO sound intriguing, but I think I'm going to go the comedy route with I, Tonya.


I cheated a little bit and went off of your Watchlist for my 3 choices for you

1# La Dolce Vita (1960) It's in the 24th HoF right now and while I haven't watched it yet, something tells me it may be ideal for you
#2 Black Narcissus (1947) Got to see this in the first Personal Recommendation HoF and thoroughly enjoyed it.
#3 Oldboy (2003) I saw you had a few similar films and went with what I feel is the top of the heap for ya.
__________________
What I actually said to win MovieGal's heart:
- I might not be a real King of Kinkiness, but I make good pancakes
~Mr Minio



My new friend @Citizen Rules recommended A Night to Remember (1958). Directed by Roy Ward Baker, this drama tells the true story of the sinking of the Titanic. It features a wonderful ensemble cast including Kenneth More, Ronald Allen, Robert Ayres, Honor Blackman, Anthony Bushell, John Cairney, Jill Dixon, amongst others. This was a really well made film. The actors all did a good job and the dialogue was intelligent and believable. The film is compelling and engaging, with some very effective and moving moments. A Night To Remember is the best of the Titanic films that I have seen . My rating is
.

I actually like this better than the Cameron epic.



My new friend @Citizen Rules recommended A Night to Remember (1958). Directed by Roy Ward Baker, this drama tells the true story of the sinking of the Titanic. It features a wonderful ensemble cast including Kenneth More, Ronald Allen, Robert Ayres, Honor Blackman, Anthony Bushell, John Cairney, Jill Dixon, amongst others. This was a really well made film. The actors all did a good job and the dialogue was intelligent and believable. The film is compelling and engaging, with some very effective and moving moments. A Night To Remember is the best of the Titanic films that I have seen . My rating is
.
Glad to hear you liked it. I'm really interested in the Titanic story and have watched a number of movies and documentaries on it. Here's an excerpt from my review:

At 2:20 a.m. on April 15, 1912, the British ocean liner R.M.S. Titanic, billed as an unsinkable ship, sinks on it's maiden voyage in the frigid waters of the North Atlantic Ocean....after striking an iceberg a few hours earlier the ship began taking on water and was doomed. The Titanic carried 2,200 passengers and crew, with only enough life boats to save less than half that number. CR

There's been well over a dozen films made about the Titanic...A Night To Remember is considered by many to be the best of the bunch. The story is based on actual transcripts from the hearings in 1912 about the sinking of the Titanic, as told by those who had survived. The film tells the story from the viewpoint of one of the souls who did survive, 2nd Officer Charles Herbert Lightoller aptly played by Kenneth More. Lightoller is our guide into a movie that plays out like a you-are-there documentary, that then gives us a deep insight into the tragedy.

What struck me is how real A Night To Remember felt. It captured the initial confusion that resulted from most passengers on the ship not even knowing that they were sinking. And it brought home the sheer panic caused by utter desperation in the loading of the lifeboat scenes.

Another powerful aspect of the film was how by incorporating stock footage of other similar size ships, it seemed as if we saw Titanic being launched and sailing out of the harbor to it's destiny.

The interior sets are fantastic! I've seen many documentaries on the Titanic and the decor in the movie looked very much like the real thing.
I loved the boiler room scenes. You could almost feel the heat from the coal fires and the deadly cold from the sea water pouring in...the drama was very human.



The Slayer (1982)
Chosen by pahaK



I'm a fan of 80's horror and I've seen a lot of them. Any decent ones I've missed I'm always happy to watch, and this was decent. It's an early nightmares blurred with reality story, and I'm a sucker for the old vacation home in the middle of nowhere cliche. Atmosphere, music, and kills were all fine, and there's a touch of cleverness and ambiguity. My only complaint; whenever you use the pitchfork through the breasts trick, you need the girl to be topless with good sized breasts.




28 days...6 hours...42 minutes...12 seconds
The Elephant Man





Nominated by @cricket

David Lynch doesn't come off as a guy too concerned with emotion that centres around sympathy or dignity. His world and the films that populate his filmography tend to lean towards abstract emotions and the absurd. The Elephant Man walks a fine line of both, with the story being the emotional core element and Lynch offering his usual "Lynchian" style of the abstract and absurd.

Why did it take me so long to watch the film? I don't really have an answer other than maybe the content didn't interest me enough and I thought I might be bored by it.

I was wrong.

This film captured me from the very beginning. It starts off as a typical Lynch film with cross-faded imagery, in this film we get elephants and the violent distress of a woman. We later find out that the woman is the mother of the deformed John Merrick. The first thing I thought of was how striking the black and white cinematography is and more importantly, how appropriate it was for this film. Seeing Hopkins walk down the smoke-filled alleys trying to find his way to the Elephant Man was beautifully done and not only set the tone of the film but transported me to that time and place. Very few films manage to capture that feeling and this film did it wonderfully.

Here is a film with genuine emotional performances. Hurt does a really good job bringing this character to life, being timid and afraid of people in the beginning and eventually crawling out of his shell. People have pointed, laughed and hit him his whole life and now someone is showing genuine care towards him. He doesn't know how to react at first but eventually sees that he can live a better life. I was utterly gutted when he was captured and whisked away to France to perform for 'Freakshows" I thought to myself, this is going to end depressingly, isn't it? Then he managed to get away, but then we get an angry mob chasing after him and my mind went back to the depressing angle. Are these people going to beat this man to death because he looks like a monster? Then we get that iconic line from him claiming he is not an animal.

The Elephant Man is a depressing look at how our society is willing to shun a brilliant mind due to their exterior complications. This man enjoys books, the theatre, drinking tea and building miniatures...yet all people can see is a monster and they treat him as such. Such is true in life, and if I ever feel bad about how my life is going, I just have to turn to this film to remind myself how truly good I've got it.
__________________
"A laugh can be a very powerful thing. Why, sometimes in life, it's the only weapon we have."

Suspect's Reviews



The Slayer (1982)
Chosen by pahaK



My only complaint; whenever you use the pitchfork through the breasts trick, you need the girl to be topless with good sized breasts.
That kill is one of my favorite movie kills. It's just so well made and stylish. And topless is definitely more important than big breasts Also, glad you liked it to a degree.



That kill is one of my favorite movie kills. It's just so well made and stylish. And topless is definitely more important than big breasts Also, glad you liked it to a degree.
It was never going to be a favorite or a great movie, but I enjoyed it and that's all that matters.



The Elephant Man





Nominated by @cricket

David Lynch doesn't come off as a guy too concerned with emotion that centres around sympathy or dignity. His world and the films that populate his filmography tend to lean towards abstract emotions and the absurd. The Elephant Man walks a fine line of both, with the story being the emotional core element and Lynch offering his usual "Lynchian" style of the abstract and absurd.

Why did it take me so long to watch the film? I don't really have an answer other than maybe the content didn't interest me enough and I thought I might be bored by it.

I was wrong.

This film captured me from the very beginning. It starts off as a typical Lynch film with cross-faded imagery, in this film we get elephants and the violent distress of a woman. We later find out that the woman is the mother of the deformed John Merrick. The first thing I thought of was how striking the black and white cinematography is and more importantly, how appropriate it was for this film. Seeing Hopkins walk down the smoke-filled alleys trying to find his way to the Elephant Man was beautifully done and not only set the tone of the film but transported me to that time and place. Very few films manage to capture that feeling and this film did it wonderfully.

Here is a film with genuine emotional performances. Hurt does a really good job bringing this character to life, being timid and afraid of people in the beginning and eventually crawling out of his shell. People have pointed, laughed and hit him his whole life and now someone is showing genuine care towards him. He doesn't know how to react at first but eventually sees that he can live a better life. I was utterly gutted when he was captured and whisked away to France to perform for 'Freakshows" I thought to myself, this is going to end depressingly, isn't it? Then he managed to get away, but then we get an angry mob chasing after him and my mind went back to the depressing angle. Are these people going to beat this man to death because he looks like a monster? Then we get that iconic line from him claiming he is not an animal.

The Elephant Man is a depressing look at how our society is willing to shun a brilliant mind due to their exterior complications. This man enjoys books, the theatre, drinking tea and building miniatures...yet all people can see is a monster and they treat him as such. Such is true in life, and if I ever feel bad about how my life is going, I just have to turn to this film to remind myself how truly good I've got it.
I think it's one of his better movies, glad you enjoyed it.