Criterion Discussion for Non-Criterion Films

Tools    





I'm not sure if anyone would be interested in poking a little fun at the idea of discussing a movie in depth as if it were a society impacting heavyweight.

For example, "Important French New Wave Cinema Title" I'd cry myself to sleep with trying to analyze it, but if you mention Planes, Trains and Automobiles, there's a movie I'd have fun writing about as if it were a super important part of film history (I mean, it kind of is anyway, isn't it?).

I understand if this thread gets crickets and no one jumps in but I'd like to at least throw a few titles out so maybe someone can jump in and begin a serious discussion about a non criterion film as if it were a highly regarded masterpiece with several layers of meaning and metaphors up the wazoo.

Up for Grabs:

- Twins

- Babarella: Queen of the Galaxy

- Buster (Phil Collins)

- Stargate

- Friday

- Weird Science

- A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy

- Ice Cream Man

- Over the Top


I could think of better ones but that should be enough for now. If anyone has a better film, please feel free to indulge this thread with a playful but deadly serious analysis!



"Money won is twice as sweet as money earned."



I've always depended on the kindness of strangers
Good idea

Twins -- Even distance couldn't keep these brothers away. Looks may be deceiving, but one even names their cat Julius. However, as we observe one who was loved and educated, and to another twin who was in and out of orphanages. We also see how the reproductive process can tilt to one's favor forever, but with the strengths of both, we have a complementary piece -- two bodies in one soul.

Very humorous!

Over the Top -- "The world meets nobody halfway".
A stunning movie about class. The arm-wrestling is a metaphor to signify man's struggle for masculinity and money, with material goods to help support that lifestyle and mentality.



Armageddon is a "highly regarded masterpiece with several layers of meaning and metaphors up the wazoo?" How about The Rock? I think people put too much stock in what being in The Criterion Collection actually means. Sure there are great movies in there but there are plenty less-than-masterpiece level films too.

As to the films you listed I don't think I've seen any of them.



The Room is a masterpiece of American cinema and probably one of the best ever made. We take a look as Johnny slowly deteriorates as his future wife cheats on him. Tommy Wiseau is truly expresses himself on the rooftop scene, yelling out to the heavens that he didn't hit her.
Greg Sestero is truly amazing as the sexually ambiguous Mark, who does a perfect job at playing a man who doesn't understand flirting. The script would make Tarantino scared as it perfectly represents the dialogue of the average human man. The colour pallet is beautiful, at the start of the film it is very bright, representing Johnny's happy subconscious. Near the end of the film the colour pallet is very dark, most likely to represent how distraught Johnny is. The football is a beautiful representation of masculinity. Notice how Mark is playing with it while talking about the story of the beaten up woman. Beating up people is very masculine. When the drug dealer is taunting Danny he isn't holding a football, possibly to show his inner cowardice. None of the female characters hold the football for obvious reasons. When in their tuxedos the men play with the football, tuxedos are usually worn by men. The football is nowhere to be scene in the final 10 minutes, possibly to show how pathetic Johnny is.

The Room is truly the smartest movie of the millennium and I urge you all to go see it as soon as possible.
__________________
Muh letterbox: https://letterboxd.com/HashtagBrownies/



Armageddon is a "highly regarded masterpiece with several layers of meaning and metaphors up the wazoo?" How about The Rock? I think people put too much stock in what being in The Criterion Collection actually means. Sure there are great movies in there but there are plenty less-than-masterpiece level films too.

As to the films you listed I don't think I've seen any of them.
Well, in fairness, Armageddon was a very early Criterion release, onto Laserdisc, no less. But yes, judging from the bulk of their catalog, they seem to lean more towards a certain pretension. Not that there's anything wrong with that.



The Room is a masterpiece of American cinema and probably one of the best ever made. We take a look as Johnny slowly deteriorates as his future wife cheats on him. Tommy Wiseau is truly expresses himself on the rooftop scene, yelling out to the heavens that he didn't hit her.
Greg Sestero is truly amazing as the sexually ambiguous Mark, who does a perfect job at playing a man who doesn't understand flirting. The script would make Tarantino scared as it perfectly represents the dialogue of the average human man. The colour pallet is beautiful, at the start of the film it is very bright, representing Johnny's happy subconscious. Near the end of the film the colour pallet is very dark, most likely to represent how distraught Johnny is. The football is a beautiful representation of masculinity. Notice how Mark is playing with it while talking about the story of the beaten up woman. Beating up people is very masculine. When the drug dealer is taunting Danny he isn't holding a football, possibly to show his inner cowardice. None of the female characters hold the football for obvious reasons. When in their tuxedos the men play with the football, tuxedos are usually worn by men. The football is nowhere to be scene in the final 10 minutes, possibly to show how pathetic Johnny is.

The Room is truly the smartest movie of the millennium and I urge you all to go see it as soon as possible.
A masterful analysis. I must see this film The Room.



Good idea

Twins -- Even distance couldn't keep these brothers away. Looks may be deceiving, but one even names their cat Julius. However, as we observe one who was loved and educated, and to another twin who was in and out of orphanages. We also see how the reproductive process can tilt to one's favor forever, but with the strengths of both, we have a complementary piece -- two bodies in one soul. Insightful and intelligent review of a titan film.

Very humorous!

Over the Top -- "The world meets nobody halfway".
A stunning movie about class. The arm-wrestling is a metaphor to signify man's struggle for masculinity and money, with material goods to help support that lifestyle and mentality. I would definitely buy that for a dollar.
Comments above



I wanted to say a quick word about Killer Klown from Outer Space.

I feel as if the cotton candy represents the human condition and how it is literally sucked through a straw by vampiric jokesters of the world as a casual snack. I think the heavy duty meaning is a bit deeper. Even though the cotton candy blood drink is a casual snack, I wouldn't imagine Klowns being able to live without it since they harvest everyone into these puffy balls of salty fruit punch cocoons.

This examines a serious problem in society. We must stop allowing Klowns to suck us dry and keep us bound with hairy candy fibers or we are doomed as a planet. I believe the hand puppetry mixed with the exploding noses and pixie dust is representative of the humankind's final stand against the tyranny of rich bullies.

Clearly the Klowns are rich. Otherwise they wouldn't be able to afford all of the toys and popcorn on a big spaceship tent.

Think about it.



Welcome to the human race...
Hey, if Dazed and Confused can get into the collection then surely the other major '90s stoner movie set over the course of 24 hours can get in there too. You could even make the case that its comedic status allows it to make better use of hood film tropes than more straightforward dramas like Boyz n the Hood without resorting to broad parody like Don't Be A Menace To South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood.
__________________
Way too much stupid talk on the forum. Iroquois, Iím thinking about you.



Hey, if Dazed and Confused can get into the collection then surely the other major '90s stoner movie set over the course of 24 hours can get in there too. You could even make the case that its comedic status allows it to make better use of hood film tropes than more straightforward dramas like Boyz n the Hood without resorting to broad parody like Don't Be A Menace To South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood.
You should pick a movie that falls below the apparent criteria for a Criterion and give us an in-depth analysis. "Let off some steam, Bennet."



I just want to hug (your FACE)!
I wanted to say a quick word about Killer Klown from Outer Space.

I feel as if the cotton candy represents the human condition and how it is literally sucked through a straw by vampiric jokesters of the world as a casual snack. I think the heavy duty meaning is a bit deeper. Even though the cotton candy blood drink is a casual snack, I wouldn't imagine Klowns being able to live without it since they harvest everyone into these puffy balls of salty fruit punch cocoons.

This examines a serious problem in society. We must stop allowing Klowns to suck us dry and keep us bound with hairy candy fibers or we are doomed as a planet. I believe the hand puppetry mixed with the exploding noses and pixie dust is representative of the humankind's final stand against the tyranny of rich bullies.

Clearly the Klowns are rich. Otherwise they wouldn't be able to afford all of the toys and popcorn on a big spaceship tent.

Think about it.
I would like to add to this.

Killer Klowns from Outer Space (1988)
When viewing the "shadow puppet" scene in which a klown stands alone and apart from those on and near a bus bench, it is remarkable how tight the symbolism is portrayed. First, we have an all-powerful entity isolating himself on the far right. On the far left, we have representation of the elderly, the working middle class, and the college youth. The klown here represents right-wing Republicanism, stated so obviously by the first elephant shadow puppet caricature; while those on the left represent the citizens of the United States. The only representation not found is that of the minority; but really, that omission is itself a statement against the social engineering of the time and government attempts to vilify the black man. It was a deliberate and poignant attempt by director Chiodo to spotlight the absence of the minority voice and plight, while suburban America began its sprawl around local malls fueled by greed and soaring credit debts.

In the following minutes, we witness the government tease the American public with ideas of patriotism and adultery through very literally raising up and all but praising the Crossing of the Delaware, clearing appealing to both the elderly and blue-collar working class as shown by the cut-away. Of course such obvious pandering does not sway the youth of our culture, no. For the sophomoric and alpha youth, the klown then presented an exotic female dance to entice. Fitting, really, considering the wide-spread HIV/AIDS epidemic of the 80s. This is clearly a statement on the over-sexualized culture of this "great" America of the time.

And what does government do once all classes are distracted and sedated to their individual conceits? Government devours the them whole. The klown is continually distracting us with shadow puppets, as government continually pulls the strings of the American citizens. Doing so while local law enforcement sit idly by, ignorant to their own role in society's breakdown. In fact, a later scene depicts very literally a klown puppeteering a hollow representation of a local police officer. If we cannot place our faith into our own law enforcement, then what can the little man do against Big Government?

I suppose you will just have to watch the movie for yourself, with my wholehearted approval.

Pure genius from the Chiados. Absolutely.

Killer Klowns from Outerspace is an epic melodrama shining a much-needed spotlight on the American sociopolitical strife of the late 1980s. Two-and-a-half thumbs up, from this reviewer.



Welcome to the human race...
You should pick a movie that falls below the apparent criteria for a Criterion and give us an in-depth analysis. "Let off some steam, Bennet."
Maybe if you paid me. I can think of a few good angles from which to analyse Commando, alright.



This thread needs more contributions

Up for Grabs still :

- Twins

- Babarella: Queen of the Galaxy

- Buster (Phil Collins)

- Stargate

- Friday

- Weird Science

- A Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy

- Ice Cream Man

- Over the Top


I could think of better ones but that should be enough for now. If anyone has a better film, please feel free to indulge this thread with a playful but deadly serious analysis!

We've already had a few bites but there has to be more discussion.



Troll 2 filled the gap for adults over 40 who were looking for their voice. Somehow, through the magic of attuned dialog, this masterpiece bit of cinema conveyed the exact emotions of dentists around the US. Troll 2 also marks a big change for concrete construction contracts where a clause was built in to local unions around the Indiana area to never plant humans inside of a heavy vase or else there would be trouble and they could fall.