Old People in Movies

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English grammar 101: Superlatives - cheap, cheaper, cheapest. (Don’t hate me. Please.)
Ha, I don’t, at all. Good point, agreed.



Ha, I don’t, at all. Good point, agreed.
English is such a beautiful language. A word for everything & then some. It also sounds beautiful. And the structure & rules are so fascinating to me. The etymology too is ridiculously interesting.

So couldn’t resist the correction. Much to my horror, I make mistakes too. I just this month learned when to use “shone” & “shined”. Can’t explain right now because I’ve forgotten what I learned, but it was very enlightening.

Gotta run. Nightie-night.
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English grammar 101: Superlatives - cheap, cheaper, cheapest. (Don’t hate me. Please.)
Ahem... cheaper is comparative. Not superlative.



Ahem... cheaper is comparative. Not superlative.
I do believe you’re right. Which only strengthens my above point that I make mistakes too.

I do now vaguely remember that “cheaper” would be comparative & “cheapest” superlative. First time I’ve ever had a convo about superlatives since I left England.



English is such a beautiful language. A word for everything & then some. It also sounds beautiful. And the structure & rules are so fascinating to me. The etymology too is ridiculously interesting.

So couldn’t resist the correction. Much to my horror, I make mistakes too. I just this month learned when to use “shone” & “shined”. Can’t explain right now because I’ve forgotten what I learned, but it was very enlightening.

Gotta run. Nightie-night.
Well, I’m going to read on ‘shone’ vs ‘shined’ now. Good night, speak soon.



Ahem... cheaper is comparative. Not superlative.
GRAMMAR FIGHT!!!



what I was getting at originally, which was that old people were seen as more disposable than other characters.
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My personal view is that creating the assumption that the elderly are destined to imminently die is cheap. It’s cheaper than suggesting a woman’s death works to motivate the protagonist for revenge.
I would disagree that it is cheaper. I think that it is equally cheap because any time you reduce a character to being purely a mechanism for evoking emotion in the audience and/or other characters, it feels cheap. I would actually argue that you often get to at least know the elderly character a bit before they die, unlike other characters (angelic wives, unnamed henchmen, THOSE POOR DOGS) that are just immediately thrown into the meat grinder.

Also, if death/loss is a part of a film, older characters just make more sense if you don't want to center the film on how a character dies. Losing someone who is elderly is an experience that most people can relate to.

I definitely agree with you about underrepresentation of older characters in film in a meaningful way, especially if you're talking about more mainstream fare.



Well, I’m going to read on ‘shone’ vs ‘shined’ now. Good night, speak soon.
“LONDON — The youngest member of Britain’s Parliament, Nadia Whittome, said she would take several weeks off on the advice of her doctor after being diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, in a candid statement that has shined a spotlight on mental health issues.”

Shined, apparently, is a transitive verb & thus takes an object. In the above case, “spotlight” being the object.

Shone is an intransitive verb & takes no object. “The sun shone”, for example.

I had no idea. In fact, in my example from today’s NY Times, I would have written “shone a spotlight”.



“LONDON — The youngest member of Britain’s Parliament, Nadia Whittome, said she would take several weeks off on the advice of her doctor after being diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder, in a candid statement that has shined a spotlight on mental health issues.”

Shined, apparently, is a transitive verb & thus takes an object. In the above case, “spotlight” being the object.

Shone is an intransitive verb & takes no object. “The sun shone”, for example.

I had no idea. In fact, in my example from today’s NY Times, I would have written “shone a spotlight”.
Thank you for that! My instinct would also be to write ‘shone’ here.

I feel very bad for Nadia. I work in public affairs PR, and I can only imagine how bad she’d had it if my job is a cesspit. But I’m glad she’s out of it, for some time at least.



I feel very bad for Nadia. I work in public affairs PR, and I can only imagine how bad she’d had it if my job is a cesspit. But I’m glad she’s out of it, for some time at least.
Never heard of her before today. She’s beautiful.

Taking a leave of absence like she’s doing would destroy her career here. She would be viewed as weak.



Never heard of her before today. She’s beautiful.

Taking a leave of absence like she’s doing would destroy her career here. She would be viewed as weak.
Oh, yeah, in the U.K. too - and between you and me, she probably is in some sense. But she’s so young, it’s to be expected. But either way, it’s her decision.



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One trope that I truly despise in movies but I see all the time is old people dying or getting a stroke or something.

It's almost as if filmmakers think the whole purpose of an old person is to die or be infirm or something.

If a movie has an older character 9 times out of 10 they will die or fall ill in some way.
I get upset (but don't despise) it when people die in movies because of age and deceases. But this is a part of life, so we can't hide away from it unfortunately.



Oh, yeah, in the U.K. too - and between you and me, she probably is in some sense. But she’s so young, it’s to be expected. But either way, it’s her decision.
Weird also how she’s donating half of her salary. She earned it, she should keep it. Would be viewed suspiciously here.



Weird also how she’s donating half of her salary. She earned it, she should keep it. Would be viewed suspiciously here.
I do think it’s probably her own choice, from what I hear, but it’s a rather extreme move and probably not the best decision in the end. Not sure what she is trying to achieve.