2nd Chance Hall of Fame

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Good to hear that you liked it that much! I might be able to watch that one tonight. I need to get crakin' on some of the noms. Wish me luck
I'm interested to see what people make of Pierrot le Fou. Not sure what the opinions are like here on Godard's films.

At least you've finished the 17th. It will probably be December before I finish either HoF.

Ahck, no luck. I went to watch Pierrot le Fou (1965) only to remember that I don't speak French I forgot to get subtitles. But I did watch another nom.
You learned how to speak French and decided to watch Le Trou instead?




"Money won is twice as sweet as money earned."



It feels like it's been ages since I watched something for this HoF, but it's only really been a few days haha. I guess since I spent all my free time this week watching horror films (is it even Halloween if you don't?), that makes it seem like more time has passed or something.

I went to watch Pierrot le Fou (1965) only to remember that I don't speak French
Well at least you remembered that you don't speak French before watching the film, and not after!





After Hours
(Martin Scorsese, 1985)

Watched my first nom for this HoF and really liked it. I though it was clever and well made. The movie hooked me quickly and kept me interested throughout the entire film. That alone is a big plus!

Griffin Dunne was perfectly cast. He was both likable and interesting. I could relate to his character as the everyday guy just trying to make it through the night. He sure fit well into the quirky world of New York City after hours when a whole lot of crazy stuff befalls this poor guy! The only other movie I recall seeing him in is An American Werewolf in London and he was likable in that too. I'm not sure why he didn't have a bigger career.

All of the supporting cast was great, and this might be my favorite Rosanne Arquette movie. Can't say I've seen her in much though, Pulp Fiction mainly. I wish we could've seen more of her but then again there's a lot of other people in the film too.

My favorite was Terri Garr. It was so funny when they first showed her, because instantly I noticed the 60s fashion style. I remember watching Terri on Late Night with David Letterman, Letterman had a crush on her and she was a regular on his show. A good guest too and always fun to watch her. I remember she often would talk about being a young adult in the 1960s. Also she'd talk about being in the 1968 movie Head which starred The Monkeys. So I got her character! as soon as I seen her in that beehive hair do with that dress and go go boots. I mean damn she really looked like she belonged back in the 60s! Even funnier when back at her apartment she does her little dance and ask him if he likes The Monkeys? It just seemed like something Terri Garr would do.







Weird is relative.
It took me a couple days, but I finished watching Farewell My Concubine tonight. Too tired right now, so I will write about it later.



I just finished watching Raise the Red Lantern, and have no idea what I want to say about it. I have nothing written down either. That's not the fault of the film at all though - my mind's just gone blank. It was a really long day, and I think I was just being overly optimistic that I'd have the energy to get my review done tonight as well haha.







After Hours is Martin Scorsese's attempt at a sex comedy

had with the film is that at one point it becomes a bit too wacky. I think the film works at it's best when Hackett is dealing with sexual issues with women but when he branches out into the other aspects of nightlife society the film kinda ratchet's down. Cheech and Chong show up and they just feel incredibly out of place.
Love the movie, but only once every 20 years. Agreed with your thoughts.





Raise the Red Lantern / 大红灯笼高高挂 (1991)
Directed By: Zhang Yimou
Starring: Gong Li, He Saifei, Kong Lin

Raise the Red Lantern is a hauntingly beautiful film about oppression, jealousy, and tradition. The film opens with a powerful scene that sets the tone for the events that follow, then moves slowly and deliberately towards its dramatic conclusion. The atmosphere is sombre and filled with tension, and the cinematography does an excellent job visualizing the joyless mood that permeates every corner of the expansive residence.

The courtyards feel cold even in the summer, with their stone walls appearing dull and colourless, except when illuminated by the red lanterns. These lanterns bathe the interior shots in a red glow, providing the only real warmth the mistresses will ever experience in their homes. Craving the pampered treatment that comes with the lanterns causes rivalries between the women, and not even the educated Songlian, who initially scoffs at the traditions, can escape their seductive allure.

The family customs and hierarchy force the mistresses into an archaic, dehumanizing system that stifles their freedom and rewards only obedient, passive behaviour. Any time Songlian tries to assert herself over the household traditions, she suffers for it. All of her actions have consequences, but it's the mental burden of punishments she has a hand in inflicting on others that do the most damage. They are all victims of unfair circumstances, and none of them are able to rise above it. It is a cruel story that criticizes historical injustices, while managing to tell a compelling, though disheartening tale.

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The scene settings in Red Lantern seem great. I look forward to that rewatch and I'm hoping for a stronger appreciation of the film. Nice write up Cosmic!



I look forward to that rewatch and I'm hoping for a stronger appreciation of the film.
I saw you had it pretty low on your list for the 6th HoF. Do you remember what didn't really work for you?



Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?
EXCELLENT write up, Cosmic. Really looking forward to a rewatch of this!
__________________
They say: that after people make love there's a kind of melancholia, the petite mort, the little death. Well, I'm here to tell you, after a romantic night with yourself there's a very acute sensation of failed suicide. ~Dylan Moran





After Hours (1985)
Directed By: Martin Scorsese
Starring: Griffin Dunne, Rosanna Arquette, Teri Garr

For a film that's described as being a comedy, I didn't find much about it to be particularly funny. I'm usually a huge fan of black comedy, so I imagine it's just the subject matter that didn't really appeal to me. That said, when events really start to connect and Paul's situation starts to spiral out of control, it did become infinitely more entertaining.
Those were my initial thoughts on After Hours when I watched it for the Chain Challenge two years ago. I was hoping that I might appreciate the comedic elements of the film more on a second viewing, but unfortunately that wasn't the case. I only laughed once, at a self-aware joke Paul makes about his situation, and didn't so much as crack a smile during the rest of the runtime. I still have no idea why the film's brand of humour just doesn't work for me, because it does seem like something I should like.

The more absurd aspects of the story that take place in the second half of the film were entertaining the first time I saw them, but since their shock value is removed when those scenes are rewatched, they just didn't have the same impact. The strange coincidences feel more predictable since they start to follow the same pattern, and my indifference towards the main character disconnected me from the tension generated by his increasingly dire plight to get home. Strangely, I really like Dunne in the role and thought his performance was outstanding, but his character's actions made him completely unsympathetic to me.

I still appreciated the film from a technical standpoint. It has a distinct style and gritty feel to it that works well with the late night, downtown setting. There are a lot of great camera movements and panning shots, as well as red herrings for the audience, such as close-ups of objects that make them appear important, when in reality they're inconsequential to the story. I honestly spent around three hours this morning reading reviews from various sources across the internet, trying to get a better understanding of the film and why it doesn't resonate with me. I genuinely want to like After Hours a lot more than I actually do, but it just doesn't seem to be my cup of tea.


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My only real problem with the film appears to be the script. While that is obviously a major issue, all of the performances are great, and I really enjoy the film's aesthetics and cinematography. It definitely gets bonus points for style alone.

If I have the time, I might try to squeeze in another viewing before the deadline. Maybe the third time will be the charm?



This has nothing to do with the film at all, but while I was doing my research this morning, I stumbled across a number of instances of review plagiarism, particularly on imdb. Some people even stole entire paragraphs from well-known critics like Roger Ebert. It was equal parts amusing and depressing haha.



Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?


After Hours (1985)
Directed By: Martin Scorsese
Starring: Griffin Dunne, Rosanna Arquette, Teri Garr


I still have no idea why the film's brand of humour just doesn't work for me, because it does seem like something I should like.

I genuinely want to like After Hours a lot more than I actually do.


That was my original review in the Last Movie Watched Thread in a nutshell and truly hoping that my revisit is not a repeat.



That was my original review in the Last Movie Watched Thread in a nutshell and truly hoping that my revisit is not a repeat.
Hopefully you can get a lot more out of it this time. I think if I were to watch it again, I'd try to focus more on the visuals and performances, and try to care less about the actual dialogue and plot. Scorsese himself supposedly said that the film was an exercise in style, so that might be the right angle to approach the film from if the comedy didn't work the first time.



...Scorsese himself supposedly said that the film was an exercise in style...
I've noticed that about his films, he often seems to be experimenting with his movies, The Aviator is one where I would have liked it better if he had not been so focused on style. He's made some of the biggest & best loved movies, but I think much of that has to do with his subject matter and not with his film making style. I'm not knocking him, I think he's talented, just saying.



After Hours



I originally saw this for the first time when it was nominated by Cobpyth in the second Hall of Fame, but I seem to watch this every year or two now. I love pretty much every thing about the film. I think the best thing it has going for it is the film setting. It's just a fun world to watch Griffin Dunnes character go through all this nonsense. I got a really big chuckle out of the taxi cab scene this time for whatever reason, watching his money fly out the window. I can't imagine anybody else but Dunne in the lead role. Again, this film, like The Aviator, shows us that Scorcese is a pretty damn crafty guy. I loved the screenplay and the quirky characters that he was able to put on the screen. This is just a perfect late night watch movie. I also can't underestimate how cool it is that this film is basically Scorseses "Wizard of Oz". He even referenced it in the movie which was just pure awesomeness for me. It looks again like this film won't have a shot, which is a true shame, but I guess I do understand that Dark comedies have their own certain audience. A masterpiece pretty much for me though.

+



Warning: Possible Spoilers for After Hours.

I got a really big chuckle out of the taxi cab scene this time for whatever reason, watching his money fly out the window.
It's funny that I'm completely fine with the wacky and unrealistic things that happen later on, but for some reason I just can't suspend my disbelief for that cab ride.

The cabbie is driving like a maniac, and the windows are wide open, so why would anyone take the only money they have out of their pocket and place it in an open tray? Is that just a custom in US or New York taxis? I wouldn't even put coins in there, let alone paper notes. I guess it could symbolize how poorly thought out Paul's trip downtown actually was, but bad decisions like that tend to bother me in films.

I do like how the falling banknote was shot though. Stopping to watch the note slowly flutter to the ground contrasted well with the hectic driving. That image did actually amuse me this time, which was a positive change since the first time I saw the film I'm pretty sure I rolled my eyes at that part haha.