Rate The Last Movie You Saw

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Monkey Business (1931)




Just what I've now come to expect from the Marx Brothers, a very funny movie. Except, what's with Zeppo? He doesn't seem to fit in or add much of anything.
Could never bare the Marx Bros.. prefered Laurel & Hardy... even The Three Stooges.



UNBROKEN: (2014).




I am on a bit of a survival film kick at the moment. One of the best most compelling I have seen recently is Unbroken.. the wartime exploits of American Olympic athlete Louis Zamperini. He, along with two USAF airmen spent a record number of days drifting in the ocean after ditching their stricken plane. Surviving that alone was a miracle. But what followed tears at the heart strings..his treatment at the hands of the brutal Japanese in a POW camp in Japan. The man was signaled out by a sadistic officer for some of the most savage treatment short of death.. all because he vanquished the same Japanese officer in a race at the Olympics. Call it pay back time as the Orientals despise losing face.. specially to men who surrender. Dishonorable. Unbroken boasts excellent acting, a rivetting storyline and superb cinematography.



2017 Murder On the Orient Express
3 out of 5.

I just saw this today, and perhaps I'm at a handicap, because I' m measuring it against the 1974 version. I'd probably bump this one up to a 3.5 if I'd never seen the earlier film; just b/c I 'm such a fan of these type of murder mysteries, and have (at one point) read every book Dame Agatha had ever written.

But for me. this version AND the so called uber actors PALED next to the original; and the unforgettable, almost stage like, on screen personas of people like Lauren Bacall,
Sean Connery, John Geilgud, Tony Perkins, etc. These were actors who knew how to command the screen. And were a delight to watch.

Johnny Depp, so often lauded as an actor who can disappear into a part - just seemed to disappear off the screen. Michelle Pfeiffer and William Dafoe had more impact, but never seemed to make me have any involvement with their character
( though I've surely enjoyed the magnetism of both of them in other films) Old timer Judi Dench was the only one who - for me - had a real presence.

The only thing I could say was superior in this version was the photography- . using all the skills of modern techniques, I think visually - the churning train wheels, the snow bound mountains, etc. - all of that was of very good quality.

But as I too often find in contemporary movies, something in the pacing or editing or over extended plot lines, or character development- something is lackluster. And lacking. The movie just started sagging for me about 2/3 through and I was just hoping they would 'get on with it.' .

Whereas the 1974 movie is one I could see over and over again, and relish the 'ride' even knowing the ending.

Btw-(semi spoiler ahead) - the one redeeming thing in the movie was that there was a sort of 'twist ' to the ending in this version from the '74 ending. A confession. Or two . A played out drama upon Poirot and a clever ploy by Poirot as a test of character.


But this sort of changed Poirot's character as well, making him more sentimental and human; but then- not the fussy, meticulous, annoying but brilliant sleuth that Christie created. I also, for no reason I can state, found the plot line and conspiracy harder to believe in this movie - whereas in the 74 version I didn't have any qualm about 'suspending disbelief,'


Still it is a well crafted AC mystery, studded with stars of this day, wandering over exotic foreign terrain; and probably more to be enjoyed by those unfamiliar with the 74 (and other) version(s). For me, the earlier film remains a mystery classic, and the one I would watch again.



2017 Murder On the Orient Express
3 out of 5.

I just saw this today, and perhaps I'm at a handicap, because I' m measuring it against the 1974 version. I'd probably bump this one up to a 3.5 if I'd never seen the earlier film; just b/c I 'm such a fan of these type of murder mysteries, and have (at one point) read every book Dame Agatha had ever written.

But for me. this version AND the so called uber actors PALED next to the original; and the unforgettable, almost stage like, on screen personas of people like Lauren Bacall,
Sean Connery, Peter Ustinov, Tony Perkins, etc. These were actors who knew how to command the screen. And were a delight to watch.

Johnny Depp, so often lauded as an actor who can disappear into a part - just seemed to disappear off the screen. Michelle Pfeiffer and William Dafoe had more impact, but never seemed to make me have any involvement with their character
( though I've surely enjoyed the magnetism of both of them in other films) Old timer Judi Dench was the only one who - for me - had a real presence.

The only thing I could say was superior in this version was the photography- . using all the skills of modern techniques, I think visually - the churning train wheels, the snow bound mountains, etc. - all of that was of very good quality.

But as I too often find in contemporary movies, something in the pacing or editing or over extended plot lines, or character development- something is lackluster. And lacking. The movie just started sagging for me about 2/3 through and I was just hoping they would 'get on with it.' .

Whereas the 1974 movie is one I could see over and over again, and relish the 'ride' even knowing the ending.

Btw-(semi spoiler ahead) - the one redeeming thing in the movie was that there was a sort of 'twist ' to the ending in this version from the '74 ending. A confession. Or two . A played out drama upon Poirot and a clever ploy by Poirot as a test of character.


But this sort of changed Poirot's character as well, making him more sentimental and human; but then- not the fussy, meticulous, annoying but brilliant sleuth that Christie created. I also, for no reason I can state, found the plot line and conspiracy harder to believe in this movie - whereas in the 74 version I didn't have any qualm about 'suspending disbelief,'


Still it is a well crafted AC mystery, studded with stars of this day, wandering over exotic foreign terrain; and probably more to be enjoyed by those unfamiliar with the 74 (and other) version(s). For me, the earlier film remains a mystery classic, and the one I would watch again.
First time seen you on this thread LL. I watched this about a month ago. Is imho the best of all versions of this iconic Christie mystery. Yes the 1974 version had a great group of character actors in the major supporting roles but was spoilt big time by the caricature portrayal of Poirot by Albert Finney. I still shudder at his performance.



❤️Grey's Anatomy And Johnny Depp & Station 19❤️
I barely remember Kiss The Girls, but I do remember this one. Absolutely horrible opening sequence with the terrible CGI car crash. Almost put me off the film right from the start.

Memorable villain, mainly because I really like Michael Wincott with his smokers voice. The whole production screams late 90's early 2000's generic thriller and I feel like it stays that way.

Also, the fact this cost around $60 million dollars, blows my mind.
yea i agree same here.
love him on the crow



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Brigsby Bear (2017)


Kinda like an under 18's version of Dogtooth.(?)


Wasn't quite as funny as I had anticipated but has a great ending.


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Brigsby Bear (2017)


Kinda like an under 18's version of Dogtooth.(?)


Wasn't quite as funny as I had anticipated but has a great ending.


Same sort of rating as I gave it. It's good, but not as good as it could have been I reckon.






Move over Black Panther because Marvel has managed to release a super hero film that is....












actually worse than Black Panther. No really I was worried that by years end Black Panther would have been the worst super hero movie of the year thankfully Ant-man and the Wasp showed up.


With that said both films are good, though Ant-man and the Wasp suffers from DC-itis. DC-itis is when you cast a dozen named actors and cram them into your movie so your story can't make any organic turns or do interesting things. Seriously this film has 14 characters and everyone is given a "moment" by the end of the film I was given a horrible sense of the could-a-beens.


This could have been a great 10-part miniseries on HBO, an attempt at a genre shift where you are making a 50's science fiction movie. Ghost is the antagonist with phasing powers and an interesting backstory and personality could have been great to see the story play out. Hank Pym and Bill Foster have a scientific and political rivalry that could have been a really good film. And I'll say this, the Michael Douglas storyline and character were much more engaging this time around. This could have been a hell of great adventure story with the crew going into the microverse to find Janet Van Dyne but what we got was typical CGI boredom.


And while I have gripes....I will admit it's a decent film. There is nothing wrong with what we got, we do see these glimmers of cool stuff that's packed into a decent comedy. I believe I liked this more than the first one because of the improvements to Douglas's character and Randal Park's Jimmy Woo. Woo is the Shield agent in-charge of watching Lang and Park and Rudd have the best chemistry in the film.





yea i agree same here.
love him on the crow
He really made me laugh in The Count of Monte Cristo, where he plays the warden of the Chateau d'If, Dorleac. In a pivotal sequence he's walking up the spiral stairs saying "I'm so bored ". I like that because he's camping it up in a completely different way to Guy Pearce, who's far too scenery-chewing for my taste.





Pacific Rim (2013)




The 400 Blows (Francois Truffaut, 1959)



Third watch. Still an absolutely incredible film with the most perfect of endings. As if I needed a reminder. I do remember liking Day For Night more than this but I'm not so sure now.



Shoot the Piano Player (Francois Truffaut, 1960)



Truffaut kick continues.




Beyond the Darkness (1979)




Italian horror from Joe D'Amato isn't bad but I didn't think it was very good either. Good atmosphere and gore, and a great musical score from The Goblins.



[quote=Marco;1924116]I have to agree with you on this one...it started off as a nice social satire, but then it tried to be something more important than it really was and it lost me...there's a review of it in my thread somewhere.



JAGGED EDGE: (1985)

Overdosing on Perry Mason growing up kinda turned me off court room dramas. So I was not expecting to be entertained when I sat down to watch Jagged Edge last nite. I am glad I did as it is a crackerjack psycho thriller. The underlying themes running thru the film are; did rich, suave playboy newspaper publisher Jack Forrester (Jeff Bridges) savagely murder his wife. And can hot shot lawyer Teddy Barnes (Glenn Close) save him from the electric chair. Once the trial begins it everything points to Forrester being guilty.He has had a string of marital affairs..his wife holds the purse strings and she is also being unfaithful. Sub plots that are integral to Jagged Edge are the anonymous notes Barnes is receiving written on a Corona 42 typerwriter that clearly are steering the blame away from Forrester.. The tension between Barnes and her former DA colleague Tom Krazny (Peter Coyote) over a previous case.. Crusty former DA friend/turned PI Sam Ransom (Robert Loggia) joining the Barnes team. Clouding the whole messy trial is the affair beween Barnes and Forrester. All of this makes for compelling viewing as the evidence is deciphered and a conclusion is reached. Is Jack Forrester innocent or not?






I Saw The Devil (2010) - Kim Jee-woon

- Amazing rewatch and totally my kind of movie. Violent, Gory and perfectly entertaining, Choi Min-sik is great as the serial killer and Lee Byung-hun is badass as well. A Favorite of mine.
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Gangster Rap is Shakespeare for the Future
Yearning (1964) by Mikio Naruse



HOLY. It's difficult to talk about a film like this, where everything you think to say feels like an oversimplification. A young man keeps his love for his widowed sister-in-law close to his chest due. She feels emotionally frozen, incapable of understanding herself in relation to the world around her and the man in front of her. His volatile modernness and her frightened rigidity butt heads just after a seemingly platonic but intensely romantic train courtship unlike any other romance scene in a train you've ever seen. The following morning when Naruse cuts all diegetic sounds abruptly and swells the music for the climactic moment, what I expected to feel like cheap sentimentality hit like a brick wall of euphoria and tragedy.