100 Favourites from the Future

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[EDIT]
100 Favourites From The Future: Rewired
It's been over four years since I originally created this thread (hastily I might add). During that time I've re-watched lots of movies from my youth and discovered a few new ones. Hence I decided it was time to update my list with what I consider to be a true collection of favourites. An unfortunate byproduct is that many member replies now appear out of context considering some movies are no longer included.


Nevertheless: if you are looking at this page for the first time, or simply revisiting then I hope you enjoy it...


100. The New Centurions (Richard Fleischer 1972)


99. (Tie) Planet of the Vampires (Mario Bava 1965)

Astronauts land on an alien planet and encounter strange spirit like aliens, who invade their bodies turning them into vampires. This film was way ahead of it's time and undoubtedly influenced the likes of 'Alien'. It's really atmospheric, has cool costume design, and garish colour saturated visuals, a must for genre fans. Bava was the man, I love it!

Galaxy of Terror (Bruce D. Clark 1981)


Whaaat!? I hear you cry...yes this is one of my guilty pleasures.
A group of astronauts search for survivors of an ill fated mission to the planet Organthus. Once there they encounter their worst nightmares made flesh and a strange pyramid structure emitting sinister energy. It may be cheap and badly edited, but it's got a really weird atmosphere, and the production design is very inventive (largely thanks to a young James Cameron). Plus the B movie cast is to die for, Robert Englund, Sid Haig, Erin moran to name but a few. Lots of inventive splatter and cool settings redeem this for me. Worth seeing just to see Robert Englund fight his double, and Joni from 'Happy Days' head explode. Cult stuff.

98. The Spy Who Loved Me (Lewis Gilbert 1977)


97.
The China Syndrome (James Bridges 1979)



96. Das Experiment (Oliver Hirchbiegel 2001)

Utterly compelling story (from the director of 'Downfall') about a group of men who sign up for an experiment in which they simulate a prison environment for two weeks. Half the men take the role of prisoners, whilst the other half become guards. Of course it all goes horribly wrong in spectacular fashion. This was based on a true story, a similar experiment having taken place in the 70's. Brilliantly acted, works as a study of human behavior and how power corrupts, but it's also a very accomplished thriller. Highly recommended.

95. Hardware
(Richard Stanley 1990)

On the surface this looks like another rip off of 'The Terminator', but don't be fooled. 'Hardware' has more in common with Donald Cammell's 1977 film 'Demon Seed' than Cameron's hit. Plus it's ultra stylish (I'd put the visuals up there with 'Blade Runner' and 'Brazil'), and has a great soundtrack from the likes of P.I.L. and Ministry. Set in a post nuke dystopia, a scavenger gives some bits of an old robot to his artist girlfriend. Said robot proceeds to tap into her apartments power supply and rebuild itself before going on the rampage. If you like horror Sci-Fi you need to seek this one out it's a gem.

94. Wonder Boys (Curtis Hanson 2000)

Charming comedy with a knockout cast, Michael Douglas (on great form here) Tobey Maguire, Frances McDormand, Robert Downey JR, and Katie Holmes. Douglas plays a pot smoking college lecturer with writers block, who takes troubled star pupil Maguire under his wing with often hilarious results. Brilliantly written, great performances all round, slightly offbeat tale, I absolutely love it.

93. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai (Jim Jarmusch 1999)

A genuine original from the brilliant Jarmusch. Forrest Whittaker (great actor) is the mysterious loner and mafia assassin Ghost Dog. He follows the 'Hagakure' code of the samurai, and the way of Bushido, living with the honor of serving one's master (in this case small time mafia hood Louie played by John Tormey). The film artfully blends Hip Hop culture, ganster movies, and Japanese philosophy. The result is a joy from start to finnish. Highly recommended.

92. The Day Of The Beast (Alex De La Iglesia 1995)



91. The Long Good Friday (John Mackenzie 1980)

Forget all that Guy Ritchie crap, this is one of the best British gangster movies ever made. London crime boss Harold Shand (a brilliant Bob Hoskins) desperately tries to figure out who is systematically wiping out his 'firm'. Set over the course of one day (as the title implies). this is a raw, tense, and hugely entertaining yarn, with good support from the very sexy Helen Mirren, and an early appearance for Pierce Brosnan. Gangster fans need to go out and buy this immediately.



"Money won is twice as sweet as money earned."



Nice start, really want to get some Bava and that looks class! Ghost Dog is really close to being on my list but The Long Good Friday is right up at the top of it.
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Damn, this is going to be a superb list. I have Hardware on my list as well, great flick. Galaxy of Terror looks to be right in my wheelhouse, I will definitely be on the lookout for that, thanks. Excellent start. Keep them coming.
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I wish people had such verbose discussions on movies here... ~ Mr. Minio



Nice start, really want to get some Bava and that looks class! Ghost Dog is really close to being on my list but The Long Good Friday is right up at the top of it.
Hi Pyro,

the list is only in loose order, I'd find it impossible to decide which of these films I like more than the other. They're all my favourites



Hi Pyro,

the list is only in loose order, I'd find it impossible to decide which of these films I like more than the other. They're all my favourites
Wouldn't worry about it, think they tend to change soon enough for most people. Looks like some great picks you're encouraging me to further my debt by buying.



Chappie doesn't like the real world

94. Wonder Boys (Curtis Hanson 2000)

Charming comedy with a knockout cast, Michael Douglas (on great form here) Tobey Maguire, Frances McDormand, Robert Downey JR, and Katie Holmes. Douglas plays a pot smoking college lecturer with writers block, who takes troubled star pupil Maguire under his wing with often hilarious results. Brilliantly written, great performances all round, slightly offbeat tale, I absolutely love it.

I do too. I even liked Katie Holmes in it.

I think your list is going to be extremely interesting, and I imagine my list of movies to watch is going to become a lot longer.



I do too. I even liked Katie Holmes in it.

I think your list is going to be extremely interesting, and I imagine my list of movies to watch is going to become a lot longer.
Thanks Godoggo,

hope my future installments don't disappoint, there's lots more to come



You're a Genius all the time
Very sweet listage, Mr. Future. I've only seen three of these bottom ten you've listed, but two of them are two of the coolest flicks I have ever seen. Pi is rubbish, though.

Keep it coming



Remember, apart from the top twenty, this list in in loose order only. Let the countdown continue...

90. Barbarella (Roger Vadim 1968)


Vadim's ultra camp and very colorful adaptation of the French comic strip. Jane Fonda is the sexy astronaut of the title out to stop villainous Duran Duran (Milo O'Shea) from unleashing a devastating weapon against Earth. Along the way she meets a whole host of crazy characters, including blind angel Pygar (John Philip Law) and the black queen (the gorgeous Anita Pallenberg). Like a psychedelic 60's time capsule from outer space, this is kooky fun all the way. Oh and the score is fantastic.

89. Alligator (Lewis Teague 1980)


88. Point Blank (John Boorman 1967)

Lee Marvin plays Walker, who after getting shot and left for dead on Alcatraz by his wife and mobster best friend (John Vernon), resurfaces two years later and takes merciless revenge. Cracking thriller, Marvin was always great, but 'Point Blank' takes the cake. Right from the early shot of him walking down a corridor with his footsteps loudly echoing and reverberating, you know you're in for a treat. This is a super cool and stylish hard boiled revenge flick, one of the best thrillers of the 60's. Marvin's Walker would eat todays heroes for breakfast.

87.
The Hidden (Jack Sholder 1987)

Underrated Sci-Fi thriller starring Kyle MacLachlan as an alien cop who teams up with Michael Nouri's human lawman on the trail of a parasitic alien. Said alien invades a series of human hosts turning each of them into fast car loving, gun toting one man crime waves. This film has car chases, violent shootouts (with lots of bloody squib effects), loads of cool music, and some snappy dialogue. Cross any decent 80's buddy cop movie with 'The Terminator' and you get this little gem. Essential stuff for genre fans.

86. The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (Joseph Sargent 1974)

Wow, just wow, this film is one cracking thriller, Walther Mathau stars, need I say more. Robert Shaw (very sinister here) and three accomplices hijack a New York subway train and it's passengers, demanding a one million dollar ransom be delivered within the hour. If the ransom's late, they start killing the hostages. Mathau is the transit cop trying to foil them. This film has a real urgency about it, cranking up the tension like you wouldn't believe. The performances are all top notch as you'd expect, and there's even room for some laughs courtesy of Mathau. If you haven't seen it, just buy it outright, you wont be disappointed.

85.From Beyond (Stuart Gordon 1986)

Gordon's yucky follow up (not sequel) to his 1985 hit 'Re-Animator' treads more on the gooey side this time. An adaptation and expantion of HP Lovecraft's short story, 'From Beyond' is an absolute hoot. Jeffrey Combs plays a scientist working for Dr Pretorius (delightfully played by Ted Sorel) who has invented the resonator, a machine that allows you to see creatures from another dimension. The trouble is they can see you too, and they're not very friendly. If you like Cormanesque 80's splatter, this is the film for you. Much more fun than a dozen Friday the 13th's, this is full of great ideas, and fans of the original 'Dawn of the Dead' will enjoy seeing Ken Foree again. Beware of edited versions though, the R1 directors cut is the one to go for.

84.
Get Carter (Mike Hodges 1971)


83. The Quiet Earth (Geoff Murphy 1985)

Think 'I am Legend' without the monsters, sound boring to you? well that's what this film's like, and it's far from boring. Set in New Zealand, Zac Hobson (Bruno Lawrence) is a scientist who wakes up one morning to find that everyone has vanished, and he's completely alone. He sets about finding other survivors, recording radio messages, making huge signs, building elaborate flashing light displays etc etc. Gradually he begins to slide into the madness of being completely alone, until he discovers Joanne (Alison Routledge). Together they try and work out the cause of the disaster. This film is brilliant in my opinion, it's intelligent, quiet stuff, and should appeal to anyone who likes their post apocalyptic movies with extra brain cells. Highly recommended.

82(tie). Trancers (Charles Band 1985)

Another guilty pleasure? not a chance! Tim Thomerson is brilliantly cast as future cop Jack Deth (a hilarious Philip Marlowe send up), given the task of hunting down 'Trancers' zombie like slaves of mind control. His mission (for budgetary reasons) sends him back in time to 1985 on the trail of Martin Whistler (Michael Stefani) the man responsible, and into the arms of Leena (a young Helen Hunt). This a great low budget answer to Blade Runner, Thomerson is an absolute scream as Deth, he must have had a ball making this, and you'll have one watching it. Just leave your brain at the front door, take a pinch of salt, and sit back to enjoy it's cheapness.

Carnival of Souls (Herk Harvey 1962)

After being driven off a bridge and into a river during a street car race, Mary (Candace Hilligoss) miraculously emerges unscathed some time (we don't know how long) later. After moving to a new town, she takes a job as a church organist, but is constantly haunted by a creepy figure dressed in black. This is a real forgotten gem, very very creepy atmosphere, and a genuinely frightening climax. It's as good as any modern chiller in my opinion, a genuine cult classic.

81. The Apartment (Billy Wilder 1960)

The fact that this is only number 81 is just further evidence that my list is in no particular order. The Apartment is an undisputed classic and winner of six oscars including best picture, and best director. Jack Lemmon (always likable) plays an insurance clerk who loans out his apartment to his bosses so they can conduct their elicit extra marital affairs there. All he wants is to keep in favor with them and hopefully win a promotion. Things become complicated however when he falls for the boss's mistress (the lovely Shirley MacLaine). Possibly the ultimate rom com, the writing is superb, and the performances are utterly charming. A real feel good movie, and must watch.





I love the nod to Charles Band, I collect his flicks anytime I see them. I'm more of a Puppet Master 1 through 27 kind of guy but a good number of his flicks are just supreme. There is a fantastic box set of his stuff available and someday I hope to purchase that bad boy. Did you know he is still making movies? I love that guy and his little puppets.



I love the nod to Charles Band, I collect his flicks anytime I see them. I'm more of a Puppet Master 1 through 27 kind of guy but a good number of his flicks are just supreme. There is a fantastic box set of his stuff available and someday I hope to purchase that bad boy. Did you know he is still making movies? I love that guy and his little puppets.

Hi PW,

I didn't know he was still making movies, I've heard about the roadshow he does though. To be honest I'm not a huge fan of his, the only other Empire Pictures film I like is called TerrorVision, and that's only because Gerritt Graham was in it. It's so terrible it's actually hilariously funny, I'm holding my VHS copy right now, hmmm might give it a watch again. I suppose Band did have a hand in Re-Animator, and come to think of it Dollman had some good bits. Thomerson's gun in that film was awesome. Sad to say I'm not into the Puppet Master films though, I can see their appeal, but they were a bit on the slasher side for me. Hope you're still enjoying the thread, and thanks for commenting,

UF



Share the love for Pelham. That is one kickass flick.
Hi SC,

Yup! I love the gritty New York feel to it, and the scenes in the mayor's house are hilarious. Not to mention Mathau's boob with the Japanese guests. Great stuff

UF.



As far as your first ten, I haven't seen any of them, that I recall.

As far as your next ten, I have seen some of them, and my favorite is easy to pick . . .

The Hidden (1987)


Yes, I own it!

If anyone is curious, from the site that Sir Toose posted . . .

Carnival of Souls (1962)



A system of cells interlinked
GREAT list so far. A true list of favorites, and the balls to post them, too.

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"It doesn't do any good to say, 'This is what it means.' When you are spoon fed a film, people instantly know what it is. I like films that leave room to dream." - D. Lynch

Film Review by Sedai



Great start... I'm adding a few to my too see list...

I added you to the MoFo Members Top 100 Lists
__________________
You never know what is enough, until you know what is more than enough.
~William Blake ~

AiSv Nv wa do hi ya do...
(Walk in Peace)




Just realised why i like your list so much- lots of 80s gems but it's just making more freakin' annoyed i didn't grow up in the 80s :angry:

Missus was took me to HMV and I was gonna get some films from your list but couldn't for life of me remember their names, so settled with Larry Cohen's Q.



Just realised why i like your list so much- lots of 80s gems but it's just making more freakin' annoyed i didn't grow up in the 80s :angry:

Missus was took me to HMV and I was gonna get some films from your list but couldn't for life of me remember their names, so settled with Larry Cohen's Q.

Q - The Winged Serpent
will be making an appearance on the list. Michael Moriarty is great in that movie, plus I really like the ambient city noises that give it a gritty streetwise feel. One for the grindhouse crowd that one.



On we go then...

80. The Poseidon Adventure (Ronald Neame 1972)


79. Shivers (David Cronenberg 1975)


78. L'Homme Du Train (Patrice Laconte 2002)

This is an endearing character study of two men. Monsieur Manesquier (Jean Rochefort) an aging English teacher, and Milan (Johnny Hallyday) a rugged bank robber. The men meet by chance in a small town and gradually become friends over the course of a weekend. The films twist is that each man wants what the other has, Mansequier to be a tough rebel, and Milan to settle and grow roots. It makes for an intriguing interplay between the two, and the film has a lovely measured pace. Both Rochefort and Hallyday put in great performances, and the ending is poignantly moving.

77. (Tie) They Call Me Trinity (Enzo Barboni 1970)
Trinity Is Still My Name (Enzo Barboni 1971)



76. Night of the Creeps (Fred Dekker 1986)

Time to place your brain in suspended animation again, with the first proper zombie film on the list. Night of the Creeps is a forgotten classic, very very funny stuff. The film begins in the 1950's with aliens fighting a parasitic alien which they eventually jettison to earth. The parasite is a slug like creature which enters the mouth and controls the brain (ala David Cronenberg's Shivers aka They Came from Within) turning the host into a mindless zombie. After it's caught and frozen, we pick up the action in the 1980's with two hapless college freshmen played by Jason Lively and Steve Marshall. The film follows the ensuing mayhem as our heroes unwittingly thaw the critter out whilst
pledging a fraternity. This film has a lot of plot holes, but the knowing dialogue, in jokes, and cheesy comic performances elevate it to cult status. The best thing about the film is Tom Atkins (pictured) having the time of his life playing a sardonic police detective. Dick Miller cameos too. If you like 80's college and horror filcks you'll love this. 'Thrill me!!!'

75. The Hitcher (Robert Harmon 1986)

Cracking midnight movie this. Jim Halsey (C. Thomas Howell) foolishly picks up John Ryder (Rutger Hauer on blistering form) whilst delivering a car to California. True to form Ryder turns out to be a complete psychopath, and proceeds to play a cat and mouse game with Halsey, framing him for a series of brutal killings. Stylish and exciting, this delivers on all levels for me, it's a great road movie, atmospheric, well acted (Jennifer Jason Leigh is also great), and sports some thrilling action scenes. Underrated stuff. Ignore the sequel and the remake though, they're crap with a capital 'C'.

74. Enter The Dragon (Robert Clouse 1973)

I'm not a huge fan of kung fu films, but Enter the Dragon is too good to pass up. The film that broke Lee to western audiences, it's still the best of it's kind in my opinion. Shaolin kung fu master Lee is hired by the secret service to infiltrate a drug and prostitution racket under the cover of a martial arts tournament. This is like watching a martial arts orientated James Bond movie, full of memorable characters like compulsive gambler Roper (John Saxon), arrogant karate expert Williams (Jim Kelly) and the ruthless Han (Kien Shih). The fights are awesome, as once it gets going it doesn't let up, brilliant. 'Man, you come right out of a comic book!'

73. Intacto (Juan Carlos Fresnadillo 2001)

Super original thriller from the director of 28 Weeks Later. The film works on the premise of luck as a commodity that can be traded and taken away. Max Von Sydow (always good) plays Samuel nicknamed 'The Jew', considered the luckiest man on the planet. Samuel lives in a casino, and has the power to remove people's luck simply by touching them. After he removes the luck of an employee and close friend, said friend sets about finding someone else with the gift, the sole survivor of a plane crash. He subsequently mentors the man through a series of underground chance games, with a view to exacting revenge against Samuel. Compelling from start to finish, this film will keep you guessing right up to the very end. It's well acted, intriguing stuff, and you wont see anything else like it, great.

72.
Assault on Precinct 13 (John Carpenter 1976)

The first, and by no means last John Carpenter film on my list. After his daughter is brutally shot, a man exacts revenge on an L.A. street gang by killing its leader. Desperate to escape, he seeks refuge in an undermanned police station due to close the following day. What follows is a gripping siege as the gang members lay wait outside, killing anyone who leaves, and eventually storming the building. Out gunned and outnumbered the police turn to the rag tag bunch of convicts in the holding cells for support. Tense and gripping, this comes on like a cross between Rio Bravo and Night of the Living Dead. The cast are all great, especially Darwin Joston as tough convict Napolean Wilson who completely steals the movie. Whatever happened to him?

71. Coogan's Bluff (Don Seigel 1968)

'The color of pity is red'. Man I love this movie. Eastwood's Arizona (not Texas) sheriff Coogan cuts a swathe across New York after hippy dippy James Ringerman (Don Stroud) escapes his custody. Playing on the culture clash of country boy in the big city, and left versus right politics, this is a highly entertaining thriller. Eastwood's old fashioned Coogan comes off like a prototype for Dirty Harry, as he breaks every rule in the book in his pursuit of Ringerman, all whilst romancing probation officer Julie Roth (Susan Clark). Highlights include a brutal pool hall punch up, and Coogan's hilarious stone faced visit to a psychedelic hippy club. Pigeon toe'd orange peel anyone?