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Strange with a very abrupt ending, but not bad at all. Glad it was made pre-Covid since there’s an extraordinary amount of kissing strangers & god knows what else.
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Oh wow, I didn't know that about Dinklage. I can see your point about Tatum. He was playing against type. At least his leading man roles. Plus they were skewering that whole romance novel heartthrob thing.

I watch movies and I immediately type something up. Maybe I should allow some time for reflection. I also watch some films and immediately gush over them. Take Ghostbusters: Afterlife for instance. I've been wanting to re-watch that. Once I thought on it I realized there were additional things there to like. There were elements that were right in my wheelhouse.
I'm sorry, didn't mean to mislead...I meant that Radcliffe's role seemed to be written with Dinklage in mind. The whole time I was watching the film, I kept picturing Dinklage in that role, I think he would have been a lot more interesting in the role than Radcliffe was. I loved Ghostbusters Afterlife




My Octopus Teacher - (2020)

In this remarkable documentary a man develops a relationship with an octopus, returning each day to foster and develop it. He finds out that these creatures are far more intelligent than you'd think, and continues the interaction for the entirety of it's life. Man, I had tears in my eyes by the end of this - rare for me. Won an Oscar for Best Documentary Feature at the 2021 Academy Awards - very much deservedly so.

8/10
I thought that it was like watching an especially good-looking Windows 95 Screensaver: utterly gorgeous underwater footage, but extremely boring otherwise. I was kind of over it after 5 or 10 minutes.



28th Hall of Fame (REWATCH)

The Travelling Players (1975) -


This is my second time watching this film and it's just as great as I remember it being. In regards to Angelopoulous, the only other film I've seen from him is Landscape in the Mist, which I also really enjoyed, but I like this one much more. Landscape in the Mist is definitely the more accessible of the two films since it has a greater emphasis on characterization, but while I enjoyed that film quite a bit, I prefer this film for its greater focus on its mysterious charm.

I stopped caring about the story and the characters about half an hour into this film and instead focused on the film's style. Angelopoulos seamlessly blends personal and political history in a number of hypnotic ways in just about every single sequence. And this is accomplished despite the film being almost four hours long! Throughout all the long takes in the film, Angelopoulos managed to drop my jaw a number of times. For one, he found all kinds of creative ways for the various political figures and set pieces to creep into the frame and intrude on or interrupt the characters lives. For example, the film sometimes showed the sounds of a patrol of Nazis or a political march in the distance get louder and louder until the characters eventually entered the frame. Also, sometimes when the characters would exit from the frame of a shot, it would linger in that location for a while until a soldier or a military vehicle would enter the frame, often indicating the film is jumping from past to present. This unconventional shooting style gave a hypnotic style to the film which I found quite mesmerizing and poetic.

The way violence is shown in this film is also impressive, specifically in regards to which bits are shown onscreen and which are shown offscreen. A recurring aspect to the violence was that, right when a violent bit would start, the characters would run away from the frame and the sounds of gunfire, explosions, or screaming could be heard in the distance, creating a strong sense of claustrophobia and (at times) fear of the unknown in the process. In many other cases, the violence served to prevent the actors from performing time and time again. The main highlight to the violence though is a lengthy sequence in the middle where the actors come across a gunfight between a patrol of Nazis and a group of Communists while sneaking through a town at night. The way the violence and the military units in this sequence are framed (they're only shown through the gaps between various houses and stores), in addition to a dose of surrealism, is nothing short of perfect.

Really, this film kept me glued to the screen from beginning to end in a way that few films have accomplished, and that it accomplishes this in spite of its length makes me all the more impressed by it. Some people may take issue with its lack of characterization, but I didn't mind that at all since it contributed to the film's mysterious power. Of course, I understand that many people will be intimidated by this film's length (which is understandable as I was worried it would be a chore to get through when I first watched it), but I still recommend giving it a chance anyways.



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.

Senior Year (Alex Hardcastle, 2022)
6/10
Monstrous (Chris Sivertson, 2022)
+ 5/10
The Nine Demons (Chang Cheh, 1984)
6/10 Dubbed Version Camp Rating 9/10
I Shot Andy Warhol (Mary Harron, 1996)
6.5/10

Feeling that Andy Warhol (Jared Harris) has too much control over her life, misandrist Valerie Solanas (Lili Taylor) shoots him and flashbacks explain why.
Most Dangerous Game (Phil Abraham, 2020)
6/10 Theatrical Version
Shark Bait (James Nunn, 2022)
- 5/10
Poison Ivy (Larry Elikann, 1985)
6/10
The Bandit (Alberto Lattuada, 1946)
6.5/10

Anna Magnani is the femme fatale In a neorealist noir set in Turin after WWII where a POW (Amedeo Nazzari) tries to rescue his sister (Carla Del Poggio) from a life of prostitution.
Fantastic Beasts: The Secrets of Dumbledore (David Yates, 2022)
6/10
A Study in Scarlet (Edwin L. Marin, 1933)
5/10
The Getaway King (Mateusz Rakowicz, 2021)
6/10
Everything Everywhere All at Once (Dan Kwan & Daniel Scheinert, 2022)
7+/10

Title is accurate as a micro-managing, diapproving yet underachieving Michelle Yeoh is put in a crazy story with her husband (Ke Huy Quan), daughter (Stephanie Hsu), father (James Hong) and a weird IRS auditor (Jamie Lee Curtis).
Time and Judgement (Menelik Shabazz, 1988)
6/10
Once You Kiss a Stranger... (Robert Sparr, 1969)
- 5/10
The Traveling Executioner (Jack Smight, 1970)
6/10
On the Count of Three (Jerrod Carmichael, 2021)
6+/10

Best friends Christopher Abbott and Jerrod Carmichael are sick and tired of living so they make a suicide pact, but on their way out, they decide ro take care of a couple of things.
Summer of Changsha (Zu Feng, 2019)
6/10
Snowy Bing Bongs Across the North Star Combat Zone (Rachel Wolther & Alex H. Fischer, 2017)
5.5/10
Our Father (Lucie Jourdan, 2022)
6/10
The Innocents (Eskil Vogt, 2021)
+ 6.5/10

Sisters Alva Brynsmo Ramstad and Rakel Lenora Fløttum become friends with two other kids (Sam Ashraf and Mina Yasmin Bremseth Asheim) and all hell [in a subtle way] breaks loose.
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I thought that it was like watching an especially good-looking Windows 95 Screensaver: utterly gorgeous underwater footage, but extremely boring otherwise. I was kind of over it after 5 or 10 minutes.
Boring?



I mean, yes. The footage is stunning, no question, it’s just that I need more from a feature-length documentary than pretty pictures and for somebody to heavy-handedly impose human emotions onto a a decidedly inhuman subject. It’s not exactly an uncommon opinion to have of the movie, either.

I’m glad that you seem to enjoy it so much, though. 🏻



Tremors is one of my favorite movies. It’s a movie that makes me wanna make movies.



11 Foreign Language movies to go

By http://www.impawards.com/2021/nightmare_alley_ver2.html, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=68734063

Nightmare Alley - (2021)

I had a distinct advantage going into this, inasmuch as I haven't seen the original 1947 version (and haven't read the novel) - so I could at least enjoy the story as it unfolded, although there's enough foreshadowing in it's first half to conclude half a dozen times, "oh...so I guess that's gonna happen later." That first half, aided by Willem Dafoe, Toni Collette, Ron Perlman and the film's setting was much more interesting and enthralling than the second, where the action shifts, and Bradley Cooper (who is admittedly quite good) and Rooney Mara, with the addition of Cate Blanchett, have to carry the film alone. The film's length is an issue, and a hot-button topic surrounding contemporary films which often lean closer to the 2½ or 3 hour mark these days. I can't complain too much, because I enjoyed it for what it was, and Guillermo del Toro wraps a cool, dark, Art Deco atmosphere around this film, which feels closer to the 1920s than the 1940s, but also seems to suit this. Overall, very grand and entertaining story about hustlers, con-men and the bad seeds they sow.

7.5/10

I mean, yes. The footage is stunning, no question, it’s just that I need more from a feature-length documentary than pretty pictures and for somebody to heavy-handedly impose human emotions onto a a decidedly inhuman subject. It’s not exactly an uncommon opinion to have of the movie, either.

I’m glad that you seem to enjoy it so much, though. 🏻
I think everyone has a very distinct right to find any artistic endeavour boring, no matter where that work really stands within a larger community as being worthwhile. I'd just add though, that I found much more in My Octopus Teacher than the rather facile one related to anthropomorphism ("Oh look! How cute! That octopus is like a person!") It doesn't really matter how common a view might be when judging a film's worth though - I think we all have to stand with our convictions, even if 99.99999% of people disagree with us - although if that proportion did differ with me, I freely admit I'd be worried.
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My movie ratings often go up or down a point or two after more reflection, research and rewatches.





I did think I needed to see it - Downtown Abbey: A New Era - I admit that I never saw a single episode of the TV show, nor the first movie, so I needed it for some kind of cultural literacy. My impression of the old show was that very, very British, ruling class people spent too much time in a huge palace, surrounded by ornate furniture and ancient Lebanon cedars, eating a little bit, drinking tea, and especially drinking a lot of booze. They all have their own plot lines, talk a lot but not much happens except that the servants bring more food and booze and everybody acts like they are part of that endangered upper crust, except, of course, for the servants who are in quite another crust.

This time it’s right around when “talkies” arrive and a British production company wants to make a sound movie at Downton. All of the usual stuff comes to a halt for a while and some of the servants as well as perpetual guests get to be in the movie.

After missing Downton for all these years, how was it for me? Well, it was pretty much exactly what I expected. I had the impression that half of the dialog went past me since I don’t know who likes who, who doesn’t like the crumpets, or whatever. Nevertheless, it was OK, well acted and filmed, with a plot and resolution. The cedars were still there, the “house” (palace) still had 300 rooms with servants creeping around dusting things, so I guess, as of the time of arrival of talkies Downton still supports a nice country life, even though the roof is leaking and money is short.

It’s not quite the end of an era, but definitely, the declining years.






Oh yeah, watched (actually re-watched) that one just last week. It's a favorite....Kevin Bacon and Fred Ward are terrific.





I know this isn't a movie but I looked for a suitable thread in the TV & Music sub forum and no dice. Just finished season 3 of Love, Death + Robots on Netflix. It's only nine episodes and together they total less than two hours of runtime. The animation(as usual) is mindblowing. In order of preference I have them ranked

1. Bad Travelling
2. In Vaulted Halls Entombed
3. The Very Pulse of the Machine
4. Jibaro
5. The Swarm
6. Three Robots: Exit Strategies
7. Kill Team Kill
8. Night of the Mini Dead
9. Mason's Rats

I didn't think there was a clearly visible clinker among them so a completely different ranking from anyone else wouldn't surprise me. I've always liked this show and wholeheartedly recommend it for fans of mind-bending scifi/horror animation.

90/100



Another big backlog. This time I thought I’d arrange them topically (since most of these belong to one collection on the Criterion Chanel or another).

Bad Spaniard: 11 Scathing Satires Directed by Luis García Berlanga —

The Executioner (1963) — A clever examination of “the invisible traps that society sets up for us,” the film follows an unwilling Executioner as he tries to do whatever he can to get out of killing a condemned man. It’s probably my favorite of Berlanga’s movies that I’ve seen so far, and easily feels like the most polished of his work.




French New Wave —

Paris Belongs to Us (1961) — it kind of plays out like a more dramatic, proto-Suicide Club, which I deeply respect and find endlessly fascinating. I only wish that the filmmaking (and especially the script) lived up to its incredible premise. Also, at 2 1/2 hours, the film quickly outstays its welcome.




Italian Neorealism —

Rocco and His Brothers (1960) — While not quite “the apotheosis of Italian Neorealism” that I was promised (that honor would still go to Bicycle Thieves), it is a rather excellent encapsulation of that moment in Italian filmmaking.**Much more polished than earlier entries in the movement, it follows a larger cast of central characters than these kinds of films usually do, delving into the various struggles they face along the way. This would be an excellent Neorealist entry point for the otherwise uninitiated.


Girl in the Window (1961) — While I always love the idea of it, few films can pull off the 180° midway turn into a completely different genre. This movie is hardly the exception to that rule, although it comes closer than most at accomplishing it. Personally, I was much more interested in all the mining business at the beginning than everything that comes after it, but the love story that it eventually turns into isn’t half bad either.


Il Posto (1961) — Focussing on the trials and tribulations of hunting for and keeping a job, this movie is pretty much spot-on as regards my own post-bachelor’s job hunting (right down to be given busywork to do on the down low, because while they didn’t need me right then, they would need me eventually and if anybody higher up found out I actually had nothing to do as a temp, I would have been let go). A stronger Italian Neorealism entry than most, it bears a striking resemblance to Bicycle Thieves in both form and function. Any fans of that film will doubtless find plenty here to enjoy.




Sundance Class of ‘92: The Year Indie Exploded —

A Brief History of Time (1992) — A pretty bog-standard “talking heads” documentary. It didn’t teach me anything I didn’t already know and presented things in the most stock way possible. It was fine, I guess, but I was hoping for something more from it.


Brother’s Keeper (1992) — I’ve seen a lot more indie documentaries in this collection than I expected to going into it. This is one of the better ones, granted, centering on a more-compelling-than-usual story of wrongful prosecution, but it’s nothing all that special in the end. Like most of these, it outstays even its modest runtime and doesn’t do much interesting filmmaking in the margins. Overall, it’s just kind of okay.


Danzón (1992) — Of a kind with something like Shall We Dance. It’s a solid, if standard, drama with the nominal focus of centering dancing hobbyists. It doesn’t do anything unexpected, but it was fairly enjoyable on the whole.


Edward II (1992) — I’m not as familiar with Christopher Marlowe as I am with his contemporary William Shakespeare, so I can’t say how much of a deviation this is from the original text. The settings could have been dressed up a bit more and nobody’s quite so good of an actor as they really needed to be, but it’s a compelling, nakedly queer story that I personally found more to my tastes than My Own Private Idaho.


Incident of Oglala (1992) — Another pretty standard, talking heads documentary that did little more than straightforwardly talk about a historical event. Still with a subject as compelling as this, I can at least walk away having learned something interesting.


Intimate Stranger (1992) — When all is said and done, it was a not a very interesting story that was not very well told. It was too short to really build up a compelling narrative, but somehow felt needlessly padded at just 60 minutes. It made some interesting pacing / editing choices, though, even if they kind of disappeared in the second half hour.


The Living End (1992) — I’m not sure exactly how much of this Thelma & Louise-alike is meant to be campy and how much just wasn’t good; this seemed to level off as it went on, though, and I was really feeling the movie in its final stretches. There were also a few really fun parts sprinkled throughout (and I certainly learned a few fun new ways to say “penis”).


Night on Earth (1992) — I’m normally not a fan of either Jim Jarmusch nor episodic vignettes, but I actually enjoyed this one quite a bit. The individual stories were compelling and didn’t outstay their welcome. The change of scenery succeeded at keeping things fresh and the cast was a lot better than I would have suspected going into it.


Shoot for the Contents (1992) — An extremely interesting and densely layered documentary about the state of the invariably nationalized art industries in then-contemporary China (for which I was surprised at just how much context I already had for the subject going into it), the film was a pretty compelling, if straightforward, treatment of its topic. Given how Hong Kong’s heretofore “independent” film industry has been increasingly put under the thumb of mainland China of late, it still feels incredibly topical.


Where Are We? Our Trip Through America (1992) — An interesting tour through 90s America that unfortunately frontloads a lot of homophobic “man on the street” interviews. It gets better in that regardas it goes on, but it kind of soured me on the project from the outset. Otherwise, it’s colorful, nominally interesting and probably the best documentary yet from this Criterion Channel collection.


Zebrahead (1992) — The movie’s heart was in the right place, but the level of execution wasn’t quite there. The issues surrounding both cultural appropriation versus earnest fandom as well as miscegenation deserved better than this movie had to offer. It also can’t help but pale against other urban dramas released around the same time as it (e.g., Boyz n the Hood, Menace II Society, Just Another Girl on the I.R.T., etc…). Still, it’s a decent, if dated movie that sometimes hits its mark.




The World of Guru Dutt —

Baaz (1953) — A fun, fairly lightweight action-adventure-musical. It’s my first Guru Dutt-directed film, so I don’t know how it’ll measure up against the rest of his filmography, but I don’t feel that it quite measures up compared to the work of contemporaries Raj Kapoor (a personal favorite of mine) or Bimal Roy.




Misc. —

The Adventures of Mark Twain (1985) — In college, the infamous “kids meet Satan” scene did the rounds as a sort of “you won’t believe how messed up this scene from a kid’s movie is.” The thing is, though, that pretty much the entire movie is exactly as messed up as that one part. It includes a kind of “Darth Twain” and a version of Injun Joe that looks like he’s tweaking on bath salts. I don’t know if I needed 80 more minutes of that one initial scene, but I sure won’t be forgetting it any time soon.


Drunken Dragon (1985) — While I would have been fine with the one-and-done viewing I had for this movie a while back, my spouse really wanted to see it again. And, honestly, it’s not hard to see why. Horrible, horrible dubbing aside, it’s a fun action-comedy with some hilarious madcap fights (including one where a fighter spends the entire time on a wheeled “land boat”) and a really fun female fighter (who, unfortunately, is really there to be the expected target of fat jokes and garden variety misogyny). Still a really fun time.


Species (1995) — It’s not quite the mainstream audiences’ Under the Skin that I was expecting it to be, and it’s not especially good when push comes to shove, but it is an intermittently fun sci-fi thriller that is unfortunately nowhere near clever enough to pull off its overly-ambitious “battle of the sexes” social commentary. At the very least, I had some fun with it, so take that for whatever that’s worth.


Muppets from Space (1999) — Growing up, it was my grandmother who was really into the Muppets in my family, so I always thought of it as “that old people’s show” instead of a happy puppet variety show aimed explicitly at children. I weirdly first started getting into them with the 2011 movie, and because my kid seems to love them so much, they’ve been added to the general rotation of things we watch as a family (mostly the YouTube shorts, but we’re quickly expanding outwards). This one was fun, but didn’t quite have the extra “umph” of some of the other ones I’ve seen.


Ghosts of Mars (2001) — It’s hard to believe that John Carpenter of all people was in charge of this mess. Basically “Doom, but as a Western,” Ghosts of Mars gives into every horrible, slapdash, turn-of-the-century horror genre impulse (only here swapping out the expected blue / green filters for a red one). A fun idea, granted, but obviously quickly and cheaply made with heavy studio oversight.


Street Fighter: The Legend of Chun-Li (2009) — I knew that this one was supposed to be bad, and that it was one of the blockbusters that came out in the disruption caused by the writer’s strike, but I didn’t expect this choppy and badly acted of a film. It **has** to be the direction, because I’ve never seen Michael Clarke Duncan this utterly lost in a scene (and he’a not alone in that regard). The script being in such shambles didn’t help things along, either. I honestly still don’t know what happened during half of this movie.


Moana (2016) — Rewatched because my kid loves it and just got one of those sound effect / button pad books that ties into it. One of my favorite Disney animated movies, I really wish that they would have had the courage of their convictions at the end when they took Maui’s hook away (instead of immediately giving him a mew hook after he learned that “hook [or] no hook, I’m still Maui,” directly undermining his character arc).


Encanto (2021) — Another rewatch because my kid saw me scrolling past it and shouted / pointed at it excitedly as I did so.**He might not fully demand that we watch only one movie all the time, but he still has rather emphatic opinions on the matter. And for somebody who normally doesn’t rewatch movies very often, this is the 21st time that I’ve seen this one.


Rurouni Kenshin: The Beginning (2021) — I don’t think that I’ll ever understand the bizarre decision to make the final entry in this film series a prequel. That being said, it’s pretty much as good as the found movies that preceded it, and finally being able to see the protagonist cut lose and kill a **lot** of people was a fun thing to see (in one instance, by wielding a sword in his mouth while his hands are tied up). Going out on a sweet ending that echoes a similar scene in The Final, this was still a lot of fun.


The Sadness (2021) — For pretty much the entire last year, I’ve been warned of this ultra-intense, ultra-gory, Crossed-inspired Taiwanese zombie movie, which promised to be about as grisly to watch as it was excellent. And, yeah, now that I was finally able to get around to it, every last thing I heard about this movie was 100% warranted. Kind of a mash-up of 28 Days Later and the New French Extremity, this raises the bar for what the subgenre is capable of showing on-screen. And, being made in the thick of the pandemic, I found the set-up for the eventual outbreak to be surprisingly stressful in its own right. It would also make for a great double-feature with South Korea’s #Alive.



Victim of The Night
Hatching (2022)
Pahanhautoja

It saddens me to say, once again, that the Finnish movie industry is among the weakest in Europe. I tried to be positive because a Finnish horror film is such a rarity, but that positivity didn't last too long. Hatching is visually ugly, the acting is mediocre at best, the writing lacks nuances and subtlety, and it fails to rouse any tension or dread (to be fair, though, it's more like a drama with horror elements than a full-on horror). I guess, there's a little extra on my rating for support.
Aw, bummer. The New York Times had given this a fairly favorable review so I was kinda excited to see this.



Victim of The Night


I know this isn't a movie but I looked for a suitable thread in the TV & Music sub forum and no dice. Just finished season 3 of Love, Death + Robots on Netflix. It's only nine episodes and together they total less than two hours of runtime. The animation(as usual) is mindblowing. In order of preference I have them ranked

1. Bad Travelling
2. In Vaulted Halls Entombed
3. The Very Pulse of the Machine
4. Jibaro
5. The Swarm
6. Three Robots: Exit Strategies
7. Kill Team Kill
8. Night of the Mini Dead
9. Mason's Rats

I didn't think there was a clearly visible clinker among them so a completely different ranking from anyone else wouldn't surprise me. I've always liked this show and wholeheartedly recommend it for fans of mind-bending scifi/horror animation.

90/100
I haven't seen S3 but I do enjoy some LD+R.



The world doesn't you owe you a damn thing


I know this isn't a movie but I looked for a suitable thread in the TV & Music sub forum and no dice. Just finished season 3 of Love, Death + Robots on Netflix. It's only nine episodes and together they total less than two hours of runtime. The animation(as usual) is mindblowing. In order of preference I have them ranked

1. Bad Travelling
2. In Vaulted Halls Entombed
3. The Very Pulse of the Machine
4. Jibaro
5. The Swarm
6. Three Robots: Exit Strategies
7. Kill Team Kill
8. Night of the Mini Dead
9. Mason's Rats

I didn't think there was a clearly visible clinker among them so a completely different ranking from anyone else wouldn't surprise me. I've always liked this show and wholeheartedly recommend it for fans of mind-bending scifi/horror animation.

90/100
I completely enjoyed season 1 a little more than I did 2 and I'm really looking forward to having some time to watch season 3.
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[quote=PHOENIX74;2302207]
By http://www.impawards.com/2021/nightmare_alley_ver2.html, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=68734063

Nightmare Alley - (2021)

I had a distinct advantage going into this, inasmuch as I haven't seen the original 1947 version (and haven't read the novel) - so I could at least enjoy the story as it unfolded, although there's enough foreshadowing in it's first half to conclude half a dozen times, "oh...so I guess that's gonna happen later." That first half, aided by Willem Dafoe, Toni Collette, Ron Perlman and the film's setting was much more interesting and enthralling than the second, where the action shifts, and Bradley Cooper (who is admittedly quite good) and Rooney Mara, with the addition of Cate Blanchett, have to carry the film alone. The film's length is an issue, and a hot-button topic surrounding contemporary films which often lean closer to the 2½ or 3 hour mark these days. I can't complain too much, because I enjoyed it for what it was, and Guillermo del Toro wraps a cool, dark, Art Deco atmosphere around this film, which feels closer to the 1920s than the 1940s, but also seems to suit this. Overall, very grand and entertaining story about hustlers, con-men and the bad seeds they sow.

7.5/10

I've never seen the original either, but I liked it a lot more than you did.



I completely enjoyed season 1 a little more than I did 2 and I'm really looking forward to having some time to watch season 3.
Same here. I thought S1 was the better one. But I think this one surpasses S2.



Interstellar -


I really liked this despite some minor hang-ups. I'm not a massive fan of Christopher Nolan's films (I haven't seen that many of them, to be fair) but either this or memento may be my favorite so far. I'll have to re-watch to be sure.

Bicycle Thieves -
, maybe
?

It's a good movie, I didn't love the pacing, though. Most everything else made up for that though.

WARNING: "Bicycle Thieves" spoilers below
The final shots of Antonio crying and walking into the crowd with Bruno holding his hand after attempting to steal a bicycle was a real gut punch.


A Man Escaped -
, maybe
?

I didn't expect to like this movie as much as I did. Very meticulous jailbreak film, very tense as well. I was on edge for what felt like half the movie, at least.