A scary thing happened on the way to the Movie Forums - Horrorcrammers

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I did get TODH by this very group of miscreants but largely on the strength of Karloff... and the general complaint was "Not enough Karloff". But when is there ever?
Vampyr I thought they would love. You thought your friends wouldn't like it. We were both wrong. Such are the perils of this passion we share.
My least favorite streams I've ever done was when one of my former roommates went into my nominations with the intention to dislike them, so he could get back at me or whatever the hell he was on about. If he went into them with an open mind and honestly didn't like them, then fine. But not even attempting to like them is completely different. I'd have no patience whatsoever for that nowadays.



The odds are not high that I would enjoy this

The odds would be 100% you will not enjoy a second of it.


Even during its non-violent moments, it is meant to be an endurance test of muddy audio, blurry video, formless narrative...not unlike watching snippets of really lousy home movies. For example ,there is a long scene of the two killers wandering around a miniature village, just pointing at all the tiny buildings and making stupid comments, telling bad jokes and saying things which have no relation to anything the viewer could possibly care about.


It is designed to make people turn it off. It's equal parts boredom and vileness.



if the film(s) actively offend me in any way, I feel like that is exactly what the film maker wants, and I don't want to give some edgelord the satisfaction of having traumatized a "normie".

I'm the same. I like films that push buttons, but I feel that there needs to be more going on for me to bother if that is all the film is going to do.It doesn't take any great skill to be offensive.


But...to legitimately shake a viewer? I don't think that comes so easy. Being offensive is one thing, but articulating pure human despair takes at least some skill. Even when that skill is apparently completely invisible, as it very much is here.



And this is where I struggle a bit with how I feel about the film. I despise it, for sure. And I don't think it's good. And I definitely don't think most people should even bother watching it. Maybe no one should watch it. Nothing I'm about to say makes me any less comfortable with my one star rating. It was lucky to get that much.



But I'd be lying if I said there isn't some kind of mysterious alchemy going on here. How quickly the film is able to burrow and fester under the skin. And, the more I think about it, what's surprising is how it's not really even the extreme violence and abuse and humiliation that does it. As it turns out, much like Texas Chainsaw, nearly all of the carnage is committed off camera. And in regards to the suffering of the victims, much like Salo, there is very little resistance or even emotional reaction shown coming from the victims. So there is somewhat of a muted effect that the violence has on the audience. It's omnipresent. It's unavoidable. We are constantly aware of the bloody end results of it. But, that's not really what lingers in the subconscious.



I think where the real horror of the film resides in the personalities of the two main characters. Or their absence of personality. They are nobodies. Absolute zeros. They aren't intimidating or creepy or strong or anything even worth remembering. They are a couple of charmless douchebags, who no one likes and whose pathetic insecurities are completely visible to anyone watching, but who in their little basement, can act like untouchable kings. Who use violence to trick themselves into thinking they matter. And it's that banality, that smallness of character, that pettiness of motiviation, that makes all the damage they create so upsetting and aggravating.


Like in many real life cases, this is exactly the kind of thing which fuels this kind of violence. It's about their total impudence, not just sexually, but socially. They don't matter, they know they don't matter, and because of this others have to die just so they can trick themselves into believing their victims matter even less than they do.



The fact that such small men can create such real world damage is what is so horrifying.



So while there is some part of me that's curious..

Just don't. I've provided whatever you might get out of the movie, without the bother of having to inflict it on yourself. Like Forced Entry, it's not worth it.



But I'd be lying if I said there isn't some kind of mysterious alchemy going on here.
This is what I meant about not wanting to dismiss it without watching it. It's not impossible for me to believe that there is SOME kernel of merit here (or with any art in general). I've just decided that my potential ROI is so low that I can safely save this until I've watched literally everything else. I'll give August Underground a try after I've watched every season of the Real Housewives franchise in its entirety.
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Yeah, to me there's just a little sadness in this. I mean, it's inherent to the Human Condition (if you will) that we can never fully share ourselves with anyone. I mean, and be received.
I know that's why I'm here and have been on all these forums was the opportunity to share in this particular joy that we get from Film. And in this thread in particular to share in the joy we get from Horror. And at that point we're already down to a really, really small percentage of the population. And yet we haven't even started parsing sub-genres and decades and styles and all of that. How do you explain to someone how the way the blue lighting made you feel in that one scene and how it stuck with you?
And I'm not even selling THAT, I'm selling Viy and Vampyr and Carnival Of Souls and I Walked With A Zombie and Lemora and Messiah Of Evil and I can't find a living soul who'll buy it.

Have you tried hanging out in a cemetery to sell to a non-living soul? Or maybe just a cemetery where they're screening Carnival of Souls? I imagine someone there would like it.



I'm disturbed that there are movies like Viy out there that I have never heard of before. As soon as I noticed that it had a potential for greatness for me, I stopped looking so I can experience it partially blind. I wonder how many other films are out there that will strike a chord with me. I like films that have the vibe of The Blair Witch Project, Picnic at Hanging Rock, Lake Mungo or Skinamarink. I'm also up for the likes of Martyrs, Audition and Hereditary. All really well known - but I really fall down when it comes to the more obscure great horror films that would have a psychological effect on me. I keep thinking there aren't that many out there - but I can see there are, and that they're just to deep within film culture to see from the surface. I watched August Underground last week, which I'd describe as a "shameful ordeal" - but if there are films like that out there, I generally have to see them.

I'm not really seeing the connection between Blair Witch and Picnic at Hanging Rock (though the latter doesn't really register for me as horror, but it isn't the first time I've seen someone list it as such and it does give me some sense of the type of horror movies one might like) - but going off of that, then since we were all just talking about it, try a double-feature of Carnival of Souls and Messiah of Evil.



A movie that I rewatched this month that Wooley's friends would hate and would go into the category of Rooms' narrow-minded horror critic wouldn't engage with at all would be Nagisa Oshima's Empire of Passion.


The general theme as I took it, was, these people have to escalate the violence because if they don't, social norms are they're going to get killed (which is a commentary on the brutality of an alleged enlightened society). And everything spirals from there.



I forgot the opening line.
I'm not really seeing the connection between Blair Witch and Picnic at Hanging Rock (though the latter doesn't really register for me as horror, but it isn't the first time I've seen someone list it as such and it does give me some sense of the type of horror movies one might like) - but going off of that, then since we were all just talking about it, try a double-feature of Carnival of Souls and Messiah of Evil.
The connection I make between Blair Witch and Hanging Rock is the way both films depend on a lot that's unseen or untold. They're also both kind of bloodless, although Blair Witch features the bloody teeth package, and in Hanging Rock you have the discovery of a dead body that has fallen from a height into a glasshouse. I was just thinking yesterday about how debatable calling it "horror" is - I only swung around when I consider the fact that it gives me chills, in much the same way Blair Witch does. In fact, it scares me more than around 85% of genuine bona-fide card-carrying horror films do.

While I'm saying something about it, I'm often wondering if many of Michael Haneke's supposedly non-horror films don't also fit that same classification - I'd throw the likes of Amour, Cachť and The White Ribbon into the horror basket. The last doesn't feature any scenes you'd call horror-related, but the vibe is surely there nearly the entire time.
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Victim of The Night

This is always fun.
It's probably been 5 or even 7 years since I'd seen it and my friends and I had just watched a Horror movie that kinda bummed me out and I wanted something fun, something I felt some confidence in (because of all the misfires I've had with them), and something they hadn't seen. Enter Demon Knight, hopefully to save the day. I was madly scrolling through my queues trying to find something before they got bored or annoyed and I thought, "Oh right, they haven't seen this, I feel fairly safe about it, and f*ck it, it is fun."
For the uninitiated, the wraparound is that The Crypt Keeper has gone to Hollywood to be a director. So he introduces his first feature-length film, Demon Knight.
The Demon Knight, Brayker, is William Sadler from The Shawshank Redemption (who is quite good again), a man on the run from The Collector (Billy Zane) who is not exactly what he appears to be. He takes a room in a hotel built into an old deconsecrated church with hotel-owner Irene (and her shotgun), local assh*le Roach (Thomas Haden Church), local hooker (with a heart of gold) Cordelia, local weirdo mailman Wally (played by Roger Rabbit himself, Charles Fleischer), local drunk Uncle Willy (Dick Miller!) and plucky ex-con Jeryline (a young and very good and incredibly hot Jada Pinkett before she even met Will Smith) and hunkers down for the night... but The Collector finds him and comes for what he feels is his. Beheadings, possessions, and just plain ol' demons ensue.


This is one of those movies that, whether it's personally to your taste or not, finds that exact right balance between Horror and Comedy and then just rides. This is no untold masterpiece, not necessarily any cult-classic, but it's a movie that hits its marks and delivers awfully well on what it is trying to be. Plus beheadings, possessions and demons.


Special credit to Billy Zane for giving, arguably, the most enjoyable performance of his career hamming it up like crazy and almost doing a full-on Beetlejuice impression but not in a bad way.
And for those wondering, my friends actually loved it and both gave it 9.5/10 (which for them doesn't actually mean it's a masterpiece or near-perfect film, just that it absolutely goes into the Halloween canon and viewing-rotation).
So I pulled this outta my ass for the win.



I forgot the opening line.
I think there is probably a limit to how many horror films anyone of us might find extraordinary, but I'm still always coming across things that are at least worth having the conversation about. Here is a handful of sometimes overlooked or obscure ones that I've watched (or rewatched) fairly recently that I think qualify as horror films which got under my skin, on different levels, in different ways. And this isn't even counting horror films which I've seen recently which I just thought were amusingly odd, or played with the form in interesting ways or are simply well made. There are a tonne out there.



Calvaire
Evil Dead Trap
Martin
Frightmare
The Brood
Eyes of Fire
Cat in the Brain
The Reflecting Skin
The Golden Glove
The Blackcoat's Daughter
Demon
Demons
Demons 2
Wake in Fright
Baskin
Creepy
Coherence (more Sci-Fi, but it plays with the same sense of dread you find in Body Snatchers)
Halley
Hour of the Wolf
Eye of the Devil
Invocation of My Demon Brother (just an experimental short, not a full movie)

Deranged
Last House on Dead End Street


As for also being a recent watched of August Underground, which was horrendous in most ways, I'm still weighing how much that shame of watching it plays into the way it horrifies. How much of my hatred of the film was based on my feelings that it 'shouldn't' have been made in the first place, and how much was actually based on me thinking it was a worthless bit of horror. Jury is still out (even if I will never stop hating it from the bottom of my soul)
Proud to be able to say I've seen Calvaire, Martin, The Brood, Wake in Fright, Coherence and Hour of the Wolf. After reading a brief letterboxd synopsis of each one I haven't seen, every single one of those went onto my watchlist.



I canít tell if Halloween II is just a bad movie or a so-bad-itís-fun movie. So many inexplicable choices. I feel like Iíve watched the first horror film made by AI.

Iím looking forward to watching Halloween III for the first time this Halloween, Iíve heard great things about it.



I was just thinking yesterday about how debatable calling it "horror" is - I only swung around when I consider the fact that it gives me chills, in much the same way Blair Witch does. In fact, it scares me more than around 85% of genuine bona-fide card-carrying horror films do.

While I'm saying something about it, I'm often wondering if many of Michael Haneke's supposedly non-horror films don't also fit that same classification - I'd throw the likes of Amour, Cachť and The White Ribbon into the horror basket. The last doesn't feature any scenes you'd call horror-related, but the vibe is surely there nearly the entire time.
I think horror is a hard genre to pin down, and it happily co-exists with many other genres.

When people start arguing if a movie is horror or not, I do somewhat glaze over. I think it's more interesting to think about what it is in a movie that trips that horror circuit in your brain.



Fade to Black -


This darkly funny horror movie plays out like Carrie for film buffs. The cinephile in question is Eric Binford (Christopher), a grown man who lives with his disapproving mother, works at a film warehouse and who makes high-stakes bets with his co-workers about film trivia like Rick's full name in Casablanca (it's too bad IMDB didn't exist yet, but I digress). In love with the classics the most, he falls for aspiring model Marilyn (Kerridge), who resembles that other Marilyn. After she stands him up, he takes his disappointment out on the many tormenters in his life, reenacting the grisliest moments from his favorite movies in the process. Meanwhile, there's a kinder, gentler and more thoughtful kind of police officer in town, Moriarty (Thomerson), who makes Eric his first assignment.

From Breaking Away to his guest roles on TV, I've enjoyed all of Dennis Christopher's work. His intensity and vibe that he could become unhinged at any moment are my favorite things about his work, which he puts to good use here. Each of Eric's revenge schemes made me laugh at one moment and sent chills down my spine the next. Also, from all the posters in Eric's room to his elaborate costumes like the Mummy and Richard Widmark in gangster mode to the expertly-timed movie clips, I felt thankful to be a movie lover in the process. As for the subplot, Falling Down may be a more fitting companion piece to this movie because like Duvall's subplot, it seems to belong in another movie for a long time. Regardless, I appreciate the hilarity that the kinder, sensitive cop is Thomerson's peak of early '80s masculinity; i.e., someone you would expect to be a bully on sight. Both plots eventually collide in a finale reminiscent of a movie that...let's just say also involves a bad guy in an unhealthy relationship with his mother.

Like those other movies I mentioned, this one also proves that tormenting outsiders is never a good idea. Is it the best movie like this? It's hard to say since there are so many of them, but it's one of the most unusual ones I've seen and I appreciate how it makes me want to check out more of them now that I realize how much potential for creativity the have. At the same time, it will be a while until I start browsing movie posters again.

If nothing else, this movies gives "Life is One God Damn Thing After Another"



In the dire world of the late 1990s horrorthon wise. Anyone have any favorites from 1994-1996? I'm eyeing the Diabolique remake. Any fond feelings toward Sometimes They Come Back Again or the so-bad-it's-good potential of Leprechaun in Space?



I forgot the opening line.
In the dire world of the late 1990s horrorthon wise. Anyone have any favorites from 1994-1996? I'm eyeing the Diabolique remake. Any fond feelings toward Sometimes They Come Back Again or the so-bad-it's-good potential of Leprechaun in Space?
I remember having a soft spot for Guy Siner's out of control over the top performance as mad scientist Dr. Mittenhand in Leprechaun 4: In Space - but it's a pretty bad movie obviously. I don't want to be held responsible.



I remember having a soft spot for Guy Siner's out of control over the top performance as mad scientist Dr. Mittenhand in Leprechaun 4: In Space - but it's a pretty bad movie obviously. I don't want to be held responsible.
SOLD!!



1994: Cemetery Man


That's all I got
Seen it. Love it. I have the feeling this weekend will be a bit dire until I can break into the 80s.

I'm detoxing with soothing Dan Olsen financial-themed long-form videos.



Willow Creek. Bobcat Goldthwait’s foray into found footage sees a couple making a documentary about Bigfoot. It’s an oddly-structured movie. With an 80 minute runtime the characters don’t go into the forest until the 30 minute mark and horror stuff doesn’t happen until an hour in, leaving only 15 minutes for it all to play out, and in a predictable and uncreative manner. There are some highlights though, mainly the people being interviewed at the beginning feel real, probably due to Goldthwait’s experience making real documentaries. Also there’s a really nice long take or two in here. Overall though it feels like barely a complete movie.


Elizabeth Harvest. I won’t put a synopsis here because I think it’s worth it to go into this knowing as little as possible. It’s not a bad sci-fi thriller akin to a Black Mirror episode. There’s some pacing issues and minor contrivances to make it all work but overall it’s a nifty little story.



Victim of The Night
I canít tell if Halloween II is just a bad movie or a so-bad-itís-fun movie. So many inexplicable choices. I feel like Iíve watched the first horror film made by AI.

Iím looking forward to watching Halloween III for the first time this Halloween, Iíve heard great things about it.
Assuming you're talking about the '81 Halloween II, I don't think either, I think it's a perfectly capable slasher, certainly miles and miles better than something like Prom Night or any of a few dozen other slashers, I think it's just that it's so deeply in the shadows of its predecessor that expectations are too high. I actually started to really enjoy Halloween II once I let go of the expectation the OG sets.
YMMV.