Rank the Steven Spielberg Films You've Seen

Tools    





That's a stretch whereas my argument, although
purposely provocative, is a fair one.
When the studio system in the US broke, filmmakers got the upper hand, and some formal experimentalism visited American mainstream (!!!) cinema. Hence the New Hollywood was born. Probably the freest epoch in American filmmaking. It's not to say films got noticeably better, but more freedom given to the filmmakers resulted in more grey (as opposed to black and white before) visions, and more personal visions. Of course Americans had auteurs before that, but they were often silenced by the studios, and their masterpieces shattered. But then came Spielberg and changed everything. He made Jaws. Quite a good film, mind you, and a grandiose commercial success, but also a film that started the entire summer blockbuster must-see box office hit idea. Spielberg did put some low-level pulp art in his films, but at the same time infantilised the viewer.
Spielberg didn't create the blockbuster. The American people (and later the people of the world) created and have sustained the blockbuster. Or at the very least, the entire team of people working on the populist blockbusters of the late '70s and early '80s, played some hand in the creation of the blockbuster as a business model, which was only sustained because it worked, because people liked it, and they still like it. Something being accessible and beloved by the public is not inherently less valuable, or as you say, "Low-level pulp art." How unbearably arrogant of you to dismiss films worked on by hardworking craftspeople (even within the constraints of the capitalist studio system that I would totally admit places financial viability over artistic intent) that reach and impact the lives of millions of people worldwide.

Spielberg didn't ruin the movies. Movies haven't been ruined by the business model that surrounds them, even as much as I myself have a distaste for that business model and the economic underpinnings that allow it to exist. Great filmmakers, great artists, including Mr. Spielberg, make great films every year, and have been for the better part of a century. They're different types of movies now than what was found in the heyday of the '70s era of morally grey films (films which I also very much like, for the record), but that's a good thing. We shouldn't want to be making the same type of movies we made 40-50 years ago. Film should change and evolve as an art form, at the blockbuster level (where we're seeing interesting work by great filmmakers who have found a way to tow the line between artistic vision and the needs of the business backing them, for better or worse), down to the smallest indie films.

As a filmmaker myself, I don't like the studio system and its constraints any more than anyone else. I would love to see more big budget films based in artistic vision succeed, and I try to go out and support them when I can, but to act as though cinema is dead because Spielberg made some good movies that were popular and changed the industry is simply absurd and to claim that mainstream Hollywood cinema, in spite of its flaws, produces nothing but garbage and we're not getting "valuable American art" each year at all levels of the craft is both patently untrue and completely disrespectful to the difficult work that artists put in every day to create meaningful work in the way that they can within the limitations of the era they live in. Cynical purist gatekeeping is all that is.

Also, here's the Spielberg I've seen, Ranked:

1- Raiders of the Lost Ark

2- Jurassic Park

3- Jaws

4- A.I. Artificial Intelligence

5- Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

6- E.T. The Extra Terrestrial

7- Bridge of Spies

8- Lincoln

9- Catch Me If You Can

10- Duel

11- Close Encounters of the Third Kind

12- Saving Private Ryan

13- The Post

14- Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom



"Money won is twice as sweet as money earned."



Ready Player One
Catch me If you can
Raider of The Lost Ark
The Lost World: Jurassic Park
The Adventures of Tintin
Minority Report



Welcome to the human race...
That's a stretch whereas my argument, although
purposely provocative, is a fair one.
When the studio system in the US broke, filmmakers got the upper hand, and some formal experimentalism visited American mainstream (!!!) cinema. Hence the New Hollywood was born. Probably the freest epoch in American filmmaking. It's not to say films got noticeably better, but more freedom given to the filmmakers resulted in more grey (as opposed to black and white before) visions, and more personal visions. Of course Americans had auteurs before that, but they were often silenced by the studios, and their masterpieces shattered. But then came Spielberg and changed everything. He made Jaws. Quite a good film, mind you, and a grandiose commercial success, but also a film that started the entire summer blockbuster must-see box office hit idea. Spielberg did put some low-level pulp art in his films, but at the same time infantilised the viewer.
I thought the studios initially gave Jaws a wide release because they wanted to make as much money as they could off what they thought would be a flop that people hated, so I don't think you can pin that on Spielberg alone. Braeden's effectively covered what else I'd have to say about this.
__________________
Way too much stupid talk on the forum. Iroquois, I’m thinking about you.



Setsuko Hara is my co-pilot
I'm amazed at how many wrong assumptions you took from my post, @BraedenG33. These were fair assumptions, though, given you don't know me, and don't get my pretending-to-be-a-film-elitist kind of humour I ironically boast, partly out of spite, partly out of boredom, and mainly just for the hell of it. For the record, though, my ratings of Spielberg films, chronologically:

Duel (1971) -

Jaws (1975) -
(this one really needs a rewatch, but I'm gonna keep this rating just to piss off @mark f )
Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) -

Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) -

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) -

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) -

Empire of the Sun (1987) -

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989) -

Jurassic Park (1993) -

Schindler's List (1993) -

The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997) -

Amistad (1997) -

Saving Private Ryan (1998) -

A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001) -

Minority Report (2002) -

War of the Worlds (2005) -

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008) -


Sadly, not even one masterpiece from this guy.
__________________
so when will we be free perpetual virgins without memory and who don't speak in search of her who on the sidewalks alternating at each train on the trains the bistros on the road the crowd of all the capitals of Europe and of the towns at dawn behind a girl alone in the waiting room i throw a rock into the pond the stories spiral out upside-down towards the sex i will recapitulate love in the real order of the circles my little girl



Schindler's List and Duel are his best films imo.
Duel is fun as hell and Schindler's List is a five star for me.
Never cared for Indiana Jones, I'll give it a chance one of this days...
__________________
“Art is not the reflection of reality, it’s the reality of the reflection.”



It seems, to me, that after "Schindler's List," Spielberg blew his wad, as it were. He hasn't done anything since that I'll even consider watching. But his hit movies from "Jurassic Park" and before, are alright. They still get the story told and entertain, but few have dated well. "Raiders of the Lost Ark" has a timeless classic vibe about it, no doubt, because it's also a period piece.



Three of his most underrated ones in my opinion are Catch Me If You Can, The Terminal, and Munich, which don't get near enough recognition in his filmography.