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The MoFo Top 100 of the 2000s Countdown

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Now Crank 2: High Voltage, THAT is an action-thriller.
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"Film is a disease. When it infects your bloodstream it takes over as the number one hormone. It bosses the enzymes, directs the pineal gland, plays Iago to your psyche. As with heroin, the antidote to Film is more Film." - Frank Capra



I didn't vote for Basterds because Kill Bill 1 and 2 got my Tarantino vote (mostly because I'd rewatched it more recently), but it has some grade A moviemaking.


I voted for Children of Men.



Professional horse shoe straightener
I suppose I'd agree that it "gave" us that, but I think it did so by just sort of...throwing it out there. It felt like pure exposition. I suppose, then, I preferred the trade off wherein we got less back story, but it came out organically.

The performances kind of seem over the top in a vacuum, but feel in place in the film itself, which I think is true of a lot of great performances. There's some pretty OOT stuff in Scorsese's classics, too, but when it serves the purpose (paranoia), it can work. I think of The Departed kinda like Liotta's cocaine binge near the end of Goodfellas, except it stays like that for most of the film.
Whatever floats your boat I guess. I just felt there was no needless action sequences, no unneccessary violence and the characters were written with alot more subtelty. You cast Jack Nicholson and you aren't going to get that. I also think Ray Winstone is a pretty weak actor and this was no exception.

There was exposition, but I wouldn't really mark against that in either film really as it's a type of film that is always going to require a bit of it. And the female characters were given more room to breathe. Which I don't think you can really say about the departed.

The ending of both is a stark contrast too. In Infernal Affairs, if memory serves me correctly we get a closure to the emotional connection of the main relationship in the story, which is quite moving and serves as a reminder about the tragedy of the piece. In The Departed, you get no such thing - instead we're faced with a full on, smack in the chops shot of a you know what crawling across the screen. I think this sums up the heavy handedness of The Departed compared to the more nuanced film making of Infernal Affairs.

The Departed is not a poor film. It's just one of those that surprises me when I see it so high in lists.



Inglourious Basterds definitely should be the number one film of @SpelingError. Just on principle.
Heh, that designation went to The Death of Mr. Lazarescu. Any movie with a spelling error in the title instantly gets a free pass from me though.



Whatever floats your boat I guess. I just felt there was no needless action sequences, no unneccessary violence and the characters were written with alot more subtelty. You cast Jack Nicholson and you aren't going to get that. I also think Ray Winstone is a pretty weak actor and this was no exception.

There was exposition, but I wouldn't really mark against that in either film really as it's a type of film that is always going to require a bit of it. And the female characters were given more room to breathe. Which I don't think you can really say about the departed.

The ending of both is a stark contrast too. In Infernal Affairs, if memory serves me correctly we get a closure to the emotional connection of the main relationship in the story, which is quite moving and serves as a reminder about the tragedy of the piece. In The Departed, you get no such thing - instead we're faced with a full on, smack in the chops shot of a you know what crawling across the screen. I think this sums up the heavy handedness of The Departed compared to the more nuanced film making of Infernal Affairs.

The Departed is not a poor film. It's just one of those that surprises me when I see it so high in lists.
This really nicely sums up the difference I felt between the two films.

Regarding the final shot, when I saw this film in the theater, at that final shot,
WARNING: spoilers below
this guy in the theater went, "Oh, ho! A rat. Get it?". And maybe that kind of says all at once why I wasn't into it.



Inglourious Basterds didn't make my ballot. I watched it several years ago and didn't care for it back then, but I have a feeling that I'd like it a lot more if I were to rewatch it, so I should definitely get on that someday.

Children of Men was on my ballot at #4. It has so many excellent scenes (the opening, the various long takes are excellent (the one in the car, especially), the cease fire, the ending, etc), the casting is great, the cinematography is stellar, and, really, it's just a remarkably well-directed film that gets better the more I watch it. Definitely didn't expect for it to make it so high on my ballot, but I'm glad my vote paid off.

1. The Death of Mr. Lazarescu (#78)
2.
3.
4. Children of Men (#17)
5.
6.
7. A Serious Man (#66)
8.
9. 28 Days Later (#45)
10.
11.
12.
13. Shaun of the Dead (#20)
14.
15.
16. Requiem For a Dream (#16)
17.
18. The Pianist (#31)
19.
20. Moon (#48)
21.
22.
23. Sunshine (#88)
24.
25. The New World (#99)



Children of Men was at my #4. I really didn't like the story premise, but the production was a phenomenal piece of film making.


The acting and pacing were first rate. But it was the cinematography, production design, editing and special effects that were extraordinary. There were several long take scenes, but my favorite was the 4 minute+ extended take of the ambush on a country road which had me scratching my head about how it could have been done.

I'm not a big Clive Owen fan, but he was perfect in this picture.


I never had the desire to see Inglourious Basterds.



16 spots left, time for some faildictions:

01. The Fellowship of the Ring
02. There Will Be Blood
03. Zodiac
04. The Dark Knight
05. No Country For Old Men
06. Kill Bill: Vol. 1
07. Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind
08. In The Mood For Love
09. Memento
10. Mulholland Drive
11. WALL·E
12. Pan's Labyrinth
13. The Two Towers
14. The Return Of The King
15. Amélie
16. Spirited Away

??. The Twilight Samurai
??. The Prisoner of Azkaban
??. Shrek
??. Road To Perdition



16 spots left, time for some faildictions:

01. The Fellowship of the Ring
13. The Two Towers
14. The Return Of The King
As much as I agree with your LotR ranking, I'm pretty sure The Return of the King will place highest of those.
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As much as I agree with your LotR ranking, I'm pretty sure The Return of the King will place highest of those.
I still remember and agree with a review you did on ROTK a while back, it was hilarious.



As much as I agree with your LotR ranking, I'm pretty sure The Return of the King will place highest of those.
Not based on the previous voting patterns here. With the MoFo Top 100 of the Millennium List Fellowhip was #1, Return of the King was #14, and Two Towers was #23. In the MoFo Top 100 reboot that was just conducted in 2020 Fellowship was #11, Return of the King was #28, and Two Towers #42.

But we will know soon enough how it shook out here. If I had to bet, it will remain the same order.



Whatever floats your boat I guess. I just felt there was no needless action sequences, no unneccessary violence and the characters were written with alot more subtelty. You cast Jack Nicholson and you aren't going to get that. I also think Ray Winstone is a pretty weak actor and this was no exception.
I think the violence is pretty important: none of the paranoia or terror really works otherwise. I guess, just in talking about this, this particular point has helped me clarify why I didn't respond more to Infernal Affairs: it felt more like a game. It felt like the only risk of being found out was that you would "lose" the story, rather than that you would be brutally murdered.

There was exposition, but I wouldn't really mark against that in either film really as it's a type of film that is always going to require a bit of it.
Aye, but to my mind that makes it all the more important to find little ways to scale back. Just a preference thing, I guess, since there's obviously a tradeoff there, and one that exists in all films to some degree.

I think the surface-level "biography in a nutshell" thing, with less backstory, dovetails really well with the story being told, though, since the characters all have those kinds of cover stories and have to interact with people on that level the whole time.

And the female characters were given more room to breathe. Which I don't think you can really say about the departed.
I'd agree with this. I think Marty was smarty enough to just have them (well, all but one) be less prominent from the get-go, which is preferable to having lots of paper-thin female characters, but I'd say this is a fair critique. Only counter I can think of is that maybe the ridiculous scheming and brutality and one-upsmanship of the whole world is because it's so male-dominated.

The ending of both is a stark contrast too. In Infernal Affairs, if memory serves me correctly we get a closure to the emotional connection of the main relationship in the story, which is quite moving and serves as a reminder about the tragedy of the piece. In The Departed, you get no such thing - instead we're faced with a full on, smack in the chops shot of a you know what crawling across the screen. I think this sums up the heavy handedness of The Departed compared to the more nuanced film making of Infernal Affairs.
I will definitely not even attempt to defend that little...well, I'll have to invent a term that's the opposite of a "grace note." It's clunky and silly and stupid (FFS, just off the top of my head, how about a little blood splatter on the window in the same shot as the dome?), but mercifully it's just a few seconds at the end of the film.



The Departed is a damn good film, if I was making a top 50 it'd be on there but never really considered for my 25

Honestly same goes for Inglorious Bastards and less so Children of Men, all movies have their charm. I remember Inglorious was the absolute talk of the town when it was released, then again so was Valkyrie at the time
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Yeah, there's no body mutilation in it



Professional horse shoe straightener
I think the violence is pretty important: none of the paranoia or terror really works otherwise. I guess, just in talking about this, this particular point has helped me clarify why I didn't respond more to Infernal Affairs: it felt more like a game. It felt like the only risk of being found out was that you would "lose" the story, rather than that you would be brutally murdered.


Aye, but to my mind that makes it all the more important to find little ways to scale back. Just a preference thing, I guess, since there's obviously a tradeoff there, and one that exists in all films to some degree.

I think the surface-level "biography in a nutshell" thing, with less backstory, dovetails really well with the story being told, though, since the characters all have those kinds of cover stories and have to interact with people on that level the whole time.


I'd agree with this. I think Marty was smarty enough to just have them (well, all but one) be less prominent from the get-go, which is preferable to having lots of paper-thin female characters, but I'd say this is a fair critique. Only counter I can think of is that maybe the ridiculous scheming and brutality and one-upsmanship of the whole world is because it's so male-dominated.


I will definitely not even attempt to defend that little...well, I'll have to invent a term that's the opposite of a "grace note." It's clunky and silly and stupid (FFS, just off the top of my head, how about a little blood splatter on the window in the same shot as the dome?), but mercifully it's just a few seconds at the end of the film.
All good points, perhaps it comes down to taste a little. As I said, the Departed isn't poor, just overrated. But then I appear to be in a tiny minority, so maybe it's me that's underrating it!



Yeah, I admit I'm not sure either. Maybe I just watched it so much I developed a deeper affinity for it, too. That seems to be a thing sometimes.




I'm kinda shocked I put Inglourious Basterds all the way #4. I'm not sure what I was thinking when I ordered my list. But I do love it. I'd lost a lot of my interest in Tarantino after Jackie Brown, and Inglourious Basterds sounded like more nonsense from him, so I only saw it in the theater basically in its last week, and I couldn't believe how enjoyable it was. There seemed no way this film should work, and yet it did. It was out on DVD the following week after I saw it, and I probably watched it another three times by the year's end. For me this is Tarantino's last great movie, because in all the ways Inglourious Basterds works when it shouldn't, his last three films simply don't work, not for me anyway.

Children of Men is great too, but I've only seen it the one time on the big screen, though I remember a lot of it. I just didn't vote for it. It looks like four more films from my list will make it.

My List:
3. Synecdoche, New York (#46)
4. Inglourious Basterds (#18)
6. Let the Right One In (#29)
8. Sin City (#47)
13. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (#53)
14. The Lives of Others (#41)
16. The Royal Tenenbaums (#35)
18. The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada (#86)
19. The Incredibles (#36)
20. Lost in Translation (#32)
22. The Man Who Wasn’t There (#84)
24. Moon (#48)
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I may go back to hating you. It was more fun.



Awards




Now to the awards received by Inglourious Basterds...

  • Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor (Christoph Waltz)
  • BAFTA Award for Best Supporting Actor (Waltz)
  • SAG Award for Best Supporting Actor (Waltz) and Best Ensemble
  • Awards Circuit Community Award for Best Cast Ensemble of the Decade
  • Cannes Film Festival Award for Best Actor (Waltz)
  • Empire Award for Best Actor (Waltz)
  • Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor (Waltz)

Among many, many others.

As for Children of Men, it won...

  • BAFTA Award for Best Cinematography (Emmanuel Lubezki) and Best Production Design
  • Saturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film
  • Awards Circuit Community Award for Best Cinematography of the Decade (Lubezki)
  • Golden Schmoes Award for Best Sci-Fi Movie of the Year
  • Indiewire Critics' Poll Award for Best Cinematography (Lubezki)
  • International Cinephile Society Award for Best Picture, Best Director (Alfonso Cuarón), Best Cinematography (Lubezki), and Best Production Design
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Haven't Seen: Children of Men. No, I don't know why I hadn't seen that one yet.

Didn't Make the List: The Departed was a solid film with some good actors. But considering the lowest rated film I had was an A-, it wasn't making the list. Some tense moments, but I felt like the third act took too much of a dip.

Inglorious Basterds is one of my final cuts from the list and honorable mentions. Features a great turn from Christoph Waltz as the villainous Hans Landa and a great character arc from Shoshanna (Melanie Laurent), Basterds features some tense pieces (the intro, the scene featuring the British lieutenant in the tavern, the climax at the theater) and never feels like it overstays its welcome with its runtime. Let's not forget Brad Pitt as Aldo Raine and Eli Roth as Donowitz.

Made the Honorable Mentions: In an attempt to get his girlfriend back and protect his family, Shaun (Simon Pegg) comes up with a plan of getting everyone back to the Winchester where they can have a pint until the zombie threat passes over. Needless to say, the plan doesn't go exactly as planned. Some big laughs as Shaun and Ed (Nick Frost) debate which records are expendable to protect themselves from a slowly advancing zombie and a fight involving a jukebox that comes on with the perfect song at the right time. Some touching moments as well as Edgar Wright is able to blend both into a winning package.