BBC Top 100 Films of the 21st Century

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I've seen these:

100. Requiem for a Dream (Darren Aronofsky, 2000)
98. Ten (Abbas Kiarostami, 2002)
96. Finding Nemo (Andrew Stanton, 2003)
94. Let the Right One In (Tomas Alfredson, 2008)
93. Ratatouille (Brad Bird, 2007)
92. The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Andrew Dominik, 2007)
87. Amélie (Jean-Pierre Jeunet, 2001)
84. Her (Spike Jonze, 2013)
83. A.I. Artificial Intelligence (Steven Spielberg, 2001)
79. Almost Famous (Cameron Crowe, 2000)
78. The Wolf of Wall Street (Martin Scorsese, 2013)
75. Inherent Vice (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2014)
74. Spring Breakers (Harmony Korine, 2012)
68. The Royal Tenenbaums (Wes Anderson, 2001)
62. Inglourious Basterds (Quentin Tarantino, 2009)
51. Inception (Christopher Nolan, 2010)
44. 12 Years a Slave (Steve McQueen, 2013)
41. Inside Out (Pete Docter, 2015)
40. Brokeback Mountain (Ang Lee, 2005)
39. The New World (Terrence Malick, 2005)
38. City of God (Fernando Meirelles and Kátia Lund, 2002)
33. The Dark Knight (Christopher Nolan, 2008)
29. WALL-E (Andrew Stanton, 2008)
25. Memento (Christopher Nolan, 2000)
24. The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012)
22. Lost in Translation (Sofia Coppola, 2003)
20. Synecdoche, New York (Charlie Kaufman, 2008)
19. Mad Max: Fury Road (George Miller, 2015)
12. Zodiac (David Fincher, 2007)
11. Inside Llewyn Davis (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2013)
10. No Country for Old Men (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2007)
9. A Separation (Asghar Farhadi, 2011)
6. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Michel Gondry, 2004)
4. Spirited Away (Hayao Miyazaki, 2001)
3. There Will Be Blood (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2007)
1. Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)

Quite a few great films there, also several that I either didn't care for or hated.



I can't count. Sometimes I've seen 51, some other times just 49, but you get the idea : I'm half a film geek.

I'm a bit dissapointed that no Herzog movie made in onto the list. I think Bad Lieutenant and Into the Abyss are far better than many movies on the list. But that's just an opinion.
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Better than any list from Empire, that's for sure.



26. 25th Hour (Spike Lee, 2002)
12. Zodiac (David Fincher, 2007)



but Requiem For A Dream only #100 is a shame.
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johnbarrymore2013's Avatar
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26. 25th Hour (Spike Lee, 2002)
12. Zodiac (David Fincher, 2007)



but Requiem For A Dream only #100 is a shame.
I absolutely love Zodiac.



Here's the full list, mostly so i don't keep having to click on the link. One i've seen in bold:

100. Toni Erdmann (Maren Ade, 2016)
100. Requiem for a Dream (Darren Aronofsky, 2000)
100. Carlos (Olivier Assayas, 2010)
99. The Gleaners and I (Agnès Varda, 2000)
98. Ten (Abbas Kiarostami, 2002)
97. White Material (Claire Denis, 2009)
96. Finding Nemo (Andrew Stanton, 2003)
95. Moonrise Kingdom (Wes Anderson, 2012)
94. Let the Right One In (Tomas Alfredson, 2008)
93. Ratatouille (Brad Bird, 2007)

92. The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Andrew Dominik, 2007)
91. The Secret in Their Eyes (Juan José Campanella, 2009)
90. The Pianist (Roman Polanski, 2002)
89. The Headless Woman (Lucrecia Martel, 2008)
88. Spotlight (Tom McCarthy, 2015)
87. Amélie (Jean-Pierre Jeunet, 2001)
86. Far From Heaven (Todd Haynes, 2002)
85. A Prophet (Jacques Audiard, 2009)
84. Her (Spike Jonze, 2013)
83. A.I. Artificial Intelligence (Steven Spielberg, 2001)
82. A Serious Man (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2009)
81. Shame (Steve McQueen, 2011)

80. The Return (Andrey Zvyagintsev, 2003)
79. Almost Famous (Cameron Crowe, 2000)
78. The Wolf of Wall Street (Martin Scorsese, 2013)

77. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel, 2007)
76. Dogville (Lars von Trier, 2003)
75. Inherent Vice (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2014)
74. Spring Breakers (Harmony Korine, 2012)
73. Before Sunset (Richard Linklater, 2004)

72. Only Lovers Left Alive (Jim Jarmusch, 2013)
71. Tabu (Miguel Gomes, 2012)
70. Stories We Tell (Sarah Polley, 2012)
69. Carol (Todd Haynes, 2015)
68. The Royal Tenenbaums (Wes Anderson, 2001)
67. The Hurt Locker (Kathryn Bigelow, 2008)

66. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter…and Spring (Kim Ki-duk, 2003)
65. Fish Tank (Andrea Arnold, 2009)
64. The Great Beauty (Paolo Sorrentino, 2013)

63. The Turin Horse (Béla Tarr and Ágnes Hranitzky, 2011)
62. Inglourious Basterds (Quentin Tarantino, 2009)
61. Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer, 2013)

60. Syndromes and a Century (Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2006)
59. A History of Violence (David Cronenberg, 2005)
58. Moolaadé (Ousmane Sembène, 2004)
57. Zero Dark Thirty (Kathryn Bigelow, 2012)
56. Werckmeister Harmonies (Béla Tarr, director; Ágnes Hranitzky, co-director, 2000)
55. Ida (Paweł Pawlikowski, 2013)
54. Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (Nuri Bilge Ceylan, 2011)
53. Moulin Rouge! (Baz Luhrmann, 2001)
52. Tropical Malady (Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2004)
51. Inception (Christopher Nolan, 2010)
50. The Assassin (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 2015)
49. Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard, 2014)
48. Brooklyn (John Crowley, 2015)
47. Leviathan (Andrey Zvyagintsev, 2014)
46. Certified Copy (Abbas Kiarostami, 2010)
45. Blue Is the Warmest Color (Abdellatif Kechiche, 2013)
44. 12 Years a Slave (Steve McQueen, 2013)
43. Melancholia (Lars von Trier, 2011)
42. Amour (Michael Haneke, 2012)
41. Inside Out (Pete Docter, 2015)

40. Brokeback Mountain (Ang Lee, 2005)
39. The New World (Terrence Malick, 2005)
38. City of God (Fernando Meirelles and Kátia Lund, 2002)
37. Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2010)
36. Timbuktu (Abderrahmane Sissako, 2014)
35. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (Ang Lee, 2000)
34. Son of Saul (László Nemes, 2015)
33. The Dark Knight (Christopher Nolan, 2008)
32. The Lives of Others (Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, 2006)

31. Margaret (Kenneth Lonergan, 2011)
30. Oldboy (Park Chan-wook, 2003)
29. WALL-E (Andrew Stanton, 2008)
28. Talk to Her (Pedro Almodóvar, 2002)
27. The Social Network (David Fincher, 2010)

26. 25th Hour (Spike Lee, 2002) (seen all but the first 20 minutes of this, won't count it though)
25. ​Memento (Christopher Nolan, 2000)
24. The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012)

23. Caché (Michael Haneke, 2005)
22. Lost in Translation (Sofia Coppola, 2003)
21. The Grand Budapest Hotel (Wes Anderson, 2014)

20. Synecdoche, New York (Charlie Kaufman, 2008)
19. Mad Max: Fury Road (George Miller, 2015)
18. The White Ribbon (Michael Haneke, 2009)
17. Pan's Labyrinth (Guillermo Del Toro, 2006)
16. Holy Motors (Leos Carax, 2012)
15. 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (Cristian Mungiu, 2007)
14. The Act of Killing (Joshua Oppenheimer, 2012)
13. Children of Men (Alfonso Cuarón, 2006)
12. Zodiac (David Fincher, 2007)

11. Inside Llewyn Davis (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2013)
10. No Country for Old Men (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2007)
9. A Separation (Asghar Farhadi, 2011)

8. Yi Yi: A One and a Two (Edward Yang, 2000)
7. The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick, 2011)
6. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Michel Gondry, 2004)
5. Boyhood (Richard Linklater, 2014)
4. Spirited Away (Hayao Miyazaki, 2001)
3. There Will Be Blood (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2007)

2. In the Mood for Love (Wong Kar-wai, 2000)
1. Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)



http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/201...greatest-films

Top 20:

20. Synecdoche, New York (Charlie Kaufman, 2008)
19. Mad Max: Fury Road (George Miller, 2015)
18. The White Ribbon (Michael Haneke, 2009)
17. Pan's Labyrinth (Guillermo Del Toro, 2006)
16. Holy Motors (Leos Carax, 2012)
15. 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (Cristian Mungiu, 2007)
14. The Act of Killing (Joshua Oppenheimer, 2012)
13. Children of Men (Alfonso Cuarón, 2006)
12. Zodiac (David Fincher, 2007)
11. Inside Llewyn Davis (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2013)
10. No Country for Old Men (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2007)
9. A Separation (Asghar Farhadi, 2011)
8. Yi Yi: A One and a Two (Edward Yang, 2000)
7. The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick, 2011)
6. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Michel Gondry, 2004)
5. Boyhood (Richard Linklater, 2014)
4. Spirited Away (Hayao Miyazaki, 2001)
3. There Will Be Blood (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2007)
2. In the Mood for Love (Wong Kar-wai, 2000)
1. Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)

The 177 critics interviewed really liked Fury Road.



Seen 56. The list is... fine? Lots of missing titles, but nothing that surprises me. At first I thought that US films were overrepresented, till I made my own list and found that it was 50% American movies . If there's something that could be said against this, is that it is too predictable, it is mostly composed of Oscar and big festival winners, movies that at the time were a big hit among critics. And I wonder if they just never change their opinions over the years, revisiting movies and etc. The list is kind of... too set in stone. The top2 are in their way to become the Citizen Kane and Vertigo of the 21st Century, in how unanimously voted and revered they are. They have become a canon that seems too solidified, and damn, it's too soon for this.

Also, my own list (it's on Letterboxd) has 33 animated films. This one has 5. Four Pixars and Spirited away (its 4th position is by far the best thing of the list). That's a reasonably high amount for a list of this sort, and in a way this is good because it shows that critics are starting to become aware of the width and possibilities of this medium, but on the other hand it is still a minimal representation that should start growing. Animation has diversified a lot in the current century. Pixar and Ghibli have been ahead for a while but there are other studios, styles and filmographies that are rising or already consolidated. I mean, for example, an animated film was just recently selected to represent Switzerland in the Academy Awards, after winning in Annecy and being screened in Cannes. Switzerland! What kind of tradition in animated films does this country have? This shows how much has this medium grown in recent years, and I can't help but think that it's still in the process of getting a solidified recognition among critics.



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Seen 56. The list is... fine? Lots of missing titles, but nothing that surprises me. At first I thought that US films were overrepresented, till I made my own list and found that it was 50% American movies . If there's something that could be said against this, is that it is too predictable, it is mostly composed of Oscar and big festival winners, movies that at the time were a big hit among critics. And I wonder if they just never change their opinions over the years, revisiting movies and etc. The list is kind of... too set in stone. The top2 are in their way to become the Citizen Kane and Vertigo of the 21st Century, in how unanimously voted and revered they are. They have become a canon that seems too solidified, and damn, it's too soon for this.

Also, my own list (it's on Letterboxd) has 33 animated films. This one has 5. Four Pixars and Spirited away (its 4th position is by far the best thing of the list). That's a reasonably high amount for a list of this sort, and in a way this is good because it shows that critics are starting to become aware of the width and possibilities of this medium, but on the other hand it is still a minimal representation that should start growing. Animation has diversified a lot in the current century. Pixar and Ghibli have been ahead for a while but there are other studios, styles and filmographies that are rising or already consolidated. I mean, for example, an animated film was just recently selected to represent Switzerland in the Academy Awards, after winning in Annecy and being screened in Cannes. Switzerland! What kind of tradition in animated films does this country have? This shows how much has this medium grown in recent years, and I can't help but think that it's still in the process of getting a solidified recognition among critics.
I never got the impression that the list was predictable, but that's probably because I was reading it without actually trying to guess what would come up next. I mean, it's a poll - the idea is to come to as close a consensus as possible. Hell, Spring Breakers made the list, after all. In any case, I can't begrudge the inclusion of older films that were successes "at the time". if anything, I think it's interesting to see what older picks make the list as they've actually had the chance to age well first and the longest amount of time to win people over (which is harder to figure out with the newer entries - if they redo this list in fifteen years' time, it'll be interesting to see what holds up from the last couple of years). Devin Faraci even said that he held off on voting for brand-new films like Mad Max: Fury Road simply because he figured that there should be a sort of cooling-off period just to make sure it can hold up.

As for the animated films - yeah, fair point, I guess. The picks on this list are still the ones that critics happen to agree on the most, so it's unsurprising that they end up being safe/boring choices like Pixar or Ghibli. It's also worth noting that this is an international list, which I think would explain why straightforward, visually-driven movies like Ratatouille and WALL-E would get more nods. This is why complaining that certain films are "missing" is kind of meaningless.
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I never got the impression that the list was predictable, but that's probably because I was reading it without actually trying to guess what would come up next. I mean, it's a poll - the idea is to come to as close a consensus as possible. Hell, Spring Breakers made the list, after all.
Precisely, Spring Breakers was a film I expected. Polarizing as it is, the way the top lists are counted almost guarantees its presence here. Not every critic loves it, but those who do are huge fans of it. It was the second choice for the year in Cahiers and I've heard a lot of praise from many other places. It even seems to have earned a solid fanbase that keeps bringing it up.

In any case, I can't begrudge the inclusion of older films that were successes "at the time". if anything, I think it's interesting to see what older picks make the list as they've actually had the chance to age well first and the longest amount of time to win people over (which is harder to figure out with the newer entries - if they redo this list in fifteen years' time, it'll be interesting to see what holds up from the last couple of years). Devin Faraci even said that he held off on voting for brand-new films like Mad Max: Fury Road simply because he figured that there should be a sort of cooling-off period just to make sure it can hold up.
Well, Mad Max ended up 19th on the list

The problem I perceive with this list actually has to do with the implications of this lack of surprising additions; when I say that the list is predictable, I mean that most if not all of the titles were in one way or the other a big hit. Most of them were Oscar contenders, won some big festival, and were talked about for months. And expected as it is, it is kind of off-putting. It gives a vibe about critics that they tend to gravitate towards the same judgements over time. I mean, I always imagine the job of a critic to be one that makes them judge and reconsider stuff all the time, since they are constantly exposed to new films that may very well change their point of view about the artform, and for that reason it is sort of disappointing to me that the same titles that were big in, say, 2005 are similarly big in 2016 without any apparent reconsideration.

As for the animated films - yeah, fair point, I guess. The picks on this list are still the ones that critics happen to agree on the most, so it's unsurprising that they end up being safe/boring choices like Pixar or Ghibli. It's also worth noting that this is an international list, which I think would explain why straightforward, visually-driven movies like Ratatouille and WALL-E would get more nods. This is why complaining that certain films are "missing" is kind of meaningless.
I don't mean complaining, which I agree it's meaningless and specially in a top list that has an above average consideration for animated films, but I think there is still a lot of work to do, we are probably in the good direction but it's not enough and it should keep growing. It's not like animated films lack critical acclaim: The tale of the Princess Kaguya, Mary and Max, It's such a beautiful day, Song of the sea, Anomalisa, Waltz with Bashir, to name a few of these movies that critics loved and praised, but for some reason, haven't trascended well enough for them to even be clear contenders in a top list. Maybe because they actually didn't like them that much, maybe because they are only seen and/or talked about by a minority. In the rare occasion when they compete in festivals with live action films, they are very rarely considered, and they are barely talked about. Whatever is the reason for this, I think it shows that there are still reservations among critics to fully accept and recognize the medium beyond certain comfort zones.



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Precisely, Spring Breakers was a film I expected. Polarizing as it is, the way the top lists are counted almost guarantees its presence here. Not every critic loves it, but those who do are huge fans of it. It was the second choice for the year in Cahiers and I've heard a lot of praise from many other places. It even seems to have earned a solid fanbase that keeps bringing it up.
I had heard that it had earned a sort of cult following but I didn't think that that'd be enough to not only put it on a professional critics' list but over so many other more obviously "reputable" films.

Well, Mad Max ended up 19th on the list

The problem I perceive with this list actually has to do with the implications of this lack of surprising additions; when I say that the list is predictable, I mean that most if not all of the titles were in one way or the other a big hit. Most of them were Oscar contenders, won some big festival, and were talked about for months. And expected as it is, it is kind of off-putting. It gives a vibe about critics that they tend to gravitate towards the same judgements over time. I mean, I always imagine the job of a critic to be one that makes them judge and reconsider stuff all the time, since they are constantly exposed to new films that may very well change their point of view about the artform, and for that reason it is sort of disappointing to me that the same titles that were big in, say, 2005 are similarly big in 2016 without any apparent reconsideration.
Yeah, to each their own and all that, though I can understand why some would prefer to lean towards films that they know hold up rather than grant it to some new movie that may not hold up. This is borne out by Boyhood being one of the more controversial choices on the list since many detractors say that it's only noteworthy for its "gimmick". Also, how apparent is the reconsideration in each of these cases? Unless you were going to go through and research every single critic's history to see if they always liked a movie or started to like/dislike it years later, then I'm not sure how much stagnation you can infer from the list. I guess that might explain why Moulin Rouge! would crack the list, at least.

I don't mean complaining, which I agree it's meaningless and specially in a top list that has an above average consideration for animated films, but I think there is still a lot of work to do, we are probably in the good direction but it's not enough and it should keep growing. It's not like animated films lack critical acclaim: The tale of the Princess Kaguya, Mary and Max, It's such a beautiful day, Song of the sea, Anomalisa, Waltz with Bashir, to name a few of these movies that critics loved and praised, but for some reason, haven't trascended well enough for them to even be clear contenders in a top list. Maybe because they actually didn't like them that much, maybe because they are only seen and/or talked about by a minority. In the rare occasion when they compete in festivals with live action films, they are very rarely considered, and they are barely talked about. Whatever is the reason for this, I think it shows that there are still reservations among critics to fully accept and recognize the medium beyond certain comfort zones.
You'll have to excuse me, there's just too many people on the Internet who see ranked best-of lists and rather vocally take issue with the fact that the persons involved with the list didn't include certain movies, which is some real forest-for-the-trees kind of thinking. But yeah, it's disappointing how some of these widely-acclaimed films don't quite have that level of support behind them, though like I said before they may not translate to every critic liking them or liking them enough to put in a top ten. It's especially weird considering how many lesser-known live-action titles were on this list (I had not heard of White Material before this list, for instance) but the animated ones on this list do feel like "easy" choices. It's Such A Beautiful Day would probably crack my own top 10 of the century so far, but I know its appeal is limited.

Spring Breakers higher then The Wolf of Wall Street? A POX ON THIS LIST!
Ah, yes, one movie about the vacuous hedonism at the heart of the American dream got ranked higher than another movie about the vacuous hedonism at the heart of the American dream. Truly cause for outrage.



Madness is the emergency exit…
100. Toni Erdmann (Maren Ade, 2016)
100. Requiem for a Dream (Darren Aronofsky, 2000)
100. Carlos (Olivier Assayas, 2010)
99. The Gleaners and I (Agnès Varda, 2000)
98. Ten (Abbas Kiarostami, 2002)
97. White Material (Claire Denis, 2009)
96. Finding Nemo (Andrew Stanton, 2003)
95. Moonrise Kingdom (Wes Anderson, 2012)
94. Let the Right One In (Tomas Alfredson, 2008)
93. Ratatouille (Brad Bird, 2007)

92. The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (Andrew Dominik, 2007)
91. The Secret in Their Eyes (Juan José Campanella, 2009)
90. The Pianist (Roman Polanski, 2002)
89. The Headless Woman (Lucrecia Martel, 2008)
88. Spotlight (Tom McCarthy, 2015)
87. Amélie (Jean-Pierre Jeunet, 2001)
86. Far From Heaven (Todd Haynes, 2002)
85. A Prophet (Jacques Audiard, 2009)
84. Her (Spike Jonze, 2013)
83. A.I. Artificial Intelligence (Steven Spielberg, 2001)
82. A Serious Man (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2009)
81. Shame (Steve McQueen, 2011)

80. The Return (Andrey Zvyagintsev, 2003)
79. Almost Famous (Cameron Crowe, 2000)
78. The Wolf of Wall Street (Martin Scorsese, 2013)
77. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel, 2007)
76. Dogville (Lars von Trier, 2003)
75. Inherent Vice (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2014)
74. Spring Breakers (Harmony Korine, 2012)
73. Before Sunset (Richard Linklater, 2004)
72. Only Lovers Left Alive (Jim Jarmusch, 2013)
71. Tabu (Miguel Gomes, 2012)
70. Stories We Tell (Sarah Polley, 2012)
69. Carol (Todd Haynes, 2015)
68. The Royal Tenenbaums (Wes Anderson, 2001)
67. The Hurt Locker (Kathryn Bigelow, 2008)

66. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter…and Spring (Kim Ki-duk, 2003)
65. Fish Tank (Andrea Arnold, 2009)
64. The Great Beauty (Paolo Sorrentino, 2013)
63. The Turin Horse (Béla Tarr and Ágnes Hranitzky, 2011)
62. Inglourious Basterds (Quentin Tarantino, 2009)
61. Under the Skin (Jonathan Glazer, 2013)
60. Syndromes and a Century (Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2006)
59. A History of Violence (David Cronenberg, 2005)
58. Moolaadé (Ousmane Sembène, 2004)
57. Zero Dark Thirty (Kathryn Bigelow, 2012)
56. Werckmeister Harmonies (Béla Tarr, director; Ágnes Hranitzky, co-director, 2000)
55. Ida (Paweł Pawlikowski, 2013)
54. Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (Nuri Bilge Ceylan, 2011)
53. Moulin Rouge! (Baz Luhrmann, 2001)
52. Tropical Malady (Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2004)
51. Inception (Christopher Nolan, 2010)
50. The Assassin (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 2015)
49. Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard, 2014)
48. Brooklyn (John Crowley, 2015)
47. Leviathan (Andrey Zvyagintsev, 2014)
46. Certified Copy (Abbas Kiarostami, 2010)
45. Blue Is the Warmest Color (Abdellatif Kechiche, 2013)
44. 12 Years a Slave (Steve McQueen, 2013)
43. Melancholia (Lars von Trier, 2011)
42. Amour (Michael Haneke, 2012)
41. Inside Out (Pete Docter, 2015)

40. Brokeback Mountain (Ang Lee, 2005)
39. The New World (Terrence Malick, 2005)
38. City of God (Fernando Meirelles and Kátia Lund, 2002)
37. Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2010)
36. Timbuktu (Abderrahmane Sissako, 2014)
35. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (Ang Lee, 2000)
34. Son of Saul (László Nemes, 2015)
33. The Dark Knight (Christopher Nolan, 2008)
32. The Lives of Others (Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, 2006)
31. Margaret (Kenneth Lonergan, 2011)
30. Oldboy (Park Chan-wook, 2003)
29. WALL-E (Andrew Stanton, 2008)
28. Talk to Her (Pedro Almodóvar, 2002)
27. The Social Network (David Fincher, 2010)

26. 25th Hour (Spike Lee, 2002)
25. ​Memento (Christopher Nolan, 2000)
24. The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012)
23. Caché (Michael Haneke, 2005)
22. Lost in Translation (Sofia Coppola, 2003)
21. The Grand Budapest Hotel (Wes Anderson, 2014)
20. Synecdoche, New York (Charlie Kaufman, 2008)
19. Mad Max: Fury Road (George Miller, 2015)
18. The White Ribbon (Michael Haneke, 2009)

17. Pan's Labyrinth (Guillermo Del Toro, 2006)
16. Holy Motors (Leos Carax, 2012)
15. 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (Cristian Mungiu, 2007)
14. The Act of Killing (Joshua Oppenheimer, 2012)
13. Children of Men (Alfonso Cuarón, 2006)
12. Zodiac (David Fincher, 2007)

11. Inside Llewyn Davis (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2013)
10. No Country for Old Men (Joel and Ethan Coen, 2007)
9. A Separation (Asghar Farhadi, 2011)

8. Yi Yi: A One and a Two (Edward Yang, 2000)
7. The Tree of Life (Terrence Malick, 2011)
6. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Michel Gondry, 2004)
5. Boyhood (Richard Linklater, 2014)
4. Spirited Away (Hayao Miyazaki, 2001)
3. There Will Be Blood (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2007)

2. In the Mood for Love (Wong Kar-wai, 2000)
1. Mulholland Drive (David Lynch, 2001)

Total: 46/100



Welcome to the human race...
I'll just list the ones I haven't seen yet...

100. Toni Erdmann (Maren Ade, 2016)
100. Carlos (Olivier Assayas, 2010)
99. The Gleaners and I (Agnès Varda, 2000)
98. Ten (Abbas Kiarostami, 2002)
97. White Material (Claire Denis, 2009)
89. The Headless Woman (Lucrecia Martel, 2008)
85. A Prophet (Jacques Audiard, 2009)
81. Shame (Steve McQueen, 2011)
80. The Return (Andrey Zvyagintsev, 2003)
77. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Julian Schnabel, 2007)
71. Tabu (Miguel Gomes, 2012)
70. Stories We Tell (Sarah Polley, 2012)
66. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter…and Spring (Kim Ki-duk, 2003)
65. Fish Tank (Andrea Arnold, 2009)
63. The Turin Horse (Béla Tarr and Ágnes Hranitzky, 2011)
60. Syndromes and a Century (Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2006)
58. Moolaadé (Ousmane Sembène, 2004)
57. Zero Dark Thirty (Kathryn Bigelow, 2012)
56. Werckmeister Harmonies (Béla Tarr, director; Ágnes Hranitzky, co-director, 2000)
52. Tropical Malady (Apichatpong Weerasethakul, 2004)
50. The Assassin (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 2015)
49. Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard, 2014)
47. Leviathan (Andrey Zvyagintsev, 2014)
46. Certified Copy (Abbas Kiarostami, 2010)
36. Timbuktu (Abderrahmane Sissako, 2014)
34. Son of Saul (László Nemes, 2015)
28. Talk to Her (Pedro Almodóvar, 2002)
23. Caché (Michael Haneke, 2005)
18. The White Ribbon (Michael Haneke, 2009)
16. Holy Motors (Leos Carax, 2012)
14. The Act of Killing (Joshua Oppenheimer, 2012)
8. Yi Yi: A One and a Two (Edward Yang, 2000)