Do you believe that Netflix is 'killing' the cinema industry?

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But even for superhero movies, a lot of them haven't been that good in the last few years that I've seen. Is there research that says they want generic mediocre worn out ones, and not really good ones?
Read my last post, it explains.



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I just want to hug (your FACE)!
I grew up on Predator, The Running Man, I Come In Peace, Total Recall, Commando, Lethal Weapon, etc., etc. I'm not sure how current super heroes are any different than the action heroes of 3 decades back. Expect for the visual effects.


I mean to say it's nothing new that started a few years ago. Besides. They make money. While that style for a period of time may (arguably) weaken variety during that time, it's has absolutely made money for the industry.



His name is Robert Paulson, His name is Robert...
I'm not sure how current super heroes are any different than the action heroes of 30 decades back.
Like whom? George Washington?
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He's done no wrong - no not the slightest thing.
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Is this why 1917 was such a hit because people with low attention spans nowadays are drawn to a movie that looks like it was shot in one take, with lots of actions and battle going on, compared to a movie a that makes you think more? Not that 1917 was bad, but I wonder if the one take and lots of action made it such a hit with today's audience?



His name is Robert Paulson, His name is Robert...
Is this why 1917 was such a hit because people with low attention spans nowadays are drawn to a movie that looks like it was shot in one take, with lots of actions and battle going on, compared to a movie a that makes you think more? Not that 1917 was bad, but I wonder if the one take and lots of action made it such a hit with today's audience?
The in-one-take thing (whether or not it really was shot in one take) to me has always smacked of a parlour trick. I actually become distracted by it, looking for the cut seams.

And I've heard the "shooting in real time" means "experiencing in real time" thing, but I always found that a bit of a concocted excuse. Directors shoot with collections of overly long shots because they're hard to do, and they like the notoriety of it.

Not because people actually like it. Again, IMO.