How come podcasts are never edited, it seems?

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Video is a completely different medium, so there's no reason to expect the same rules or trade offs to apply. I feel like most of the answers here are obvious, but just off the top of my head:

1) Video editing can enhance the product in more obvious and overt ways than audio editing (which, when done well, is invisible) can. With audio, all you can do is play other audio. With video, you can show relevant clips, and even talk over them. The editing, then, has more upside.

2) Video is more obviously performative, in that it usually involves someone looking into the camera, so the "just listening in on a conversation" feeling is usually already out the window, which means there's less inherent tolerance for a lack of production/editing.

3) People are more self-conscious about pauses, stumbling, stammering, or digressions while on video.

4) The barriers to entry on videos are higher, because they involve more complicated and potentially expensive tools to edit properly, whereas anyone can fire up Audacity, so videos are already probably self-selecting, upfront, for slightly more engaged or competent creators in aggregate.

5) I'm pretty sure people do post lots of crappy unedited videos, anyway. But a lot of video watching on the Internet is algorithmic, so I'd imagine you're a lot less likely to stumble upon it just browsing YouTube, for example, because it's a lot less likely to recommend it to you.
Oh, sorry, here are some questions I had about your points before:

1. Maybe it's just me, but I can tell the difference in unedited audio in just as obvious a way as video, in the sense that people pause and studder and make mistakes just as much, if it's not edited. I can't see one being more overt than the other. Are you saying people have a lower attention span when it comes to video, so they have to cut more, compared to audio?

2. Oh okay, I thought you could watch a conversation on video if you wanted to, and some vidoes are like that, where it's all an unedited one take conversation. But I still believe in cutting there too, which is why it's done often.

3. Why is this? Maybe it's me and but in my filmmaking, I am just as self conscious of pauses, stumbling, and digressions in the audio, just as much as in the video.

4. So people have lower standards in podcasts, because the technology to edit them with is not as complicated as video?

5. Well there are no podcasts on youtube near as much to compare to videos for sure.



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1. Maybe it's just me, but I can tell the difference in unedited audio in just as obvious a way as video, in the sense that people pause and studder and make mistakes just as much, if it's not edited. I can't see one being more overt than the other. Are you saying people have a lower attention span when it comes to video, so they have to cut more, compared to audio?
That isn't quite what I was saying, but I think that's also true, yeah. A lot of people put audio on in the background of something else...which is another reason the standards are lower, come to think of it. If you just need something to listen to while driving, or coding, or browsing, or exercising...you get the idea.

2. Oh okay, I thought you could watch a conversation on video if you wanted to, and some vidoes are like that, where it's all an unedited one take conversation. But I still believe in cutting there too, which is why it's done often.
There is some, yeah, but I think it's a lot rarer. I feel like the overwhelming majority of podcasts are just conversations without sound effects (since that's all you add to them, really, other than conversation), whereas most videos have relevant clip spliced in.

3. Why is this? Maybe it's me and but in my filmmaking, I am just as self conscious of pauses, stumbling, and digressions in the audio, just as much as in the video.
Being seen feels very different than being heard, just on a deep level, I think. I definitely behave differently if I'm casting with a webcam than when I'm just casting. I'd say this is particularly pronounced for people who spend a lot of time on the Internet, which are disproportionately the people making this stuff, too.

4. So people have lower standards in podcasts, because the technology to edit them with is not as complicated as video?
That's not quite what I mean. I'm saying the fact that it's harder to do creates a barrier so that more people bounce off of video editing entirely because it's too hard, or because they're not sure how to get started. I'm saying the standards are lower because this screening process--in the creators and not the listeners/watchers--has created a different baseline of quality, which in turn becomes the demand/expectation for the people consuming it.

5. Well there are no podcasts on youtube near as much to compare to videos for sure.
Yeah, I wouldn't underestimate the role algorithms play in all this, for sure.
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You can't be as old as I am, and we definitely used "bobo" in regard to silly shoes. Ironically, back in my childhood, Chuck Taylors were not in vogue and were often called bobo sneakers. They had been in, in the 50s and then were out for a while in the 60s+... but then seemed to come back in fashion and stayed there.

But in that small window of time, they were bobo sneakers! Totally jank.
Age is a relative term, but Imma '76er baby. I guess it was the early 80s when a friend started throwing out that Bobo term. Mostly calling out kid's shoes with it. He was loud and could be mean spirited at times.

Unrelated story incoming: we were all in 5th or 6th grade and my group of friends (maybe 6 of us?) all sorta crushed on this one girl in our class. To protect the identity of this girl, I will refer to her as Jennifer Casuailita. So Jennifer Casualita would "go with" one of us for about a two-week window before breaking up and then moving on to the next guy. Now we were young, so the most action we were aware of was probably just holding hands in the hallway or MAYBE a quick smooch on the playground. Dynamics were innocent for the most part. The problem was that for while she was with one guy of our group, the rest of us would turn on him and beat him up daily during recess for cheating his friends knowing we all liked her. Two weeks later, it's was another friend's role to eat dirt. On and on throughout the term until she moved on to older guys.

I never really liked her myself, so I was safe from the mob beatings. As such, I felt it inappropriate to take part in it so I mostly just observed events from the outer circle making mental notes on the likely chance that I might one day share my recollections on an online movie forum. I never questioned what a online forum was at the time as I was just too young to take seriously such matters.

By 10th grade, ol' Jennifer Casualita eventually moved on to older boys that had already graduated or simply dropped out of high school. I think she lives in Georgia now.
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A good host/moderator goes a long way, as well. When someone first recommended a Joe Rogan podcast to me, I went to watch/listen to it, saw the length (I think this particular episode clocked in at over 3 hours), and said to myself "Yeah Right!"

Alas, I fired it up, and listened to the entire thing. Rogan has a knack for keeping the conversation moving, and bailing out of lines of conversation if they are getting stale, while simultaneously putting his guest at ease to just kick back and shoot the ****, letting them open up about a great many things. Other podcasts I have tried have a host that is too dry, or seems lost or unsure, and i am ready to bail after 5 minutes.
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Technically it means of low or poor quality, though I think in usage it usually ends up noting a general lack of polish. I hear it in gaming communities a lot. I think it gets a lot more use on the Internet than most other places, since it applies to so many things here.
Must be trending since I came across “janky” (same meaning) in The NY Times yesterday. I felt very with-it knowing what it means.
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