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The trick is not minding
Maybe it's a time thing for me. I saw it back before New York got cleaned up and this was the kind of horror-show many of us in the rest of the country believed New York actually was. I certainly don't remember anything goofy or the least bit campy about it but then I probably haven't seen it in like seven years.
I wouldnít call it campy necessarily, but the gang motifs were definitely goofy at times. Iím thinking of the Baseball Furies and the gang on Rollerskates specifically.
Maybe I was just jaded when I watched this. But I didnít think it was that dark and definitely not edgy. Just some fun action.



I donít agree the movie wasnít written well. It goes far beyond than just Katherines example. The movie itself wasnít written well. Why not destroy the machine?
Crawford does try to destroy the machine. It is the first thing he does after the incident with Pretorius. And
WARNING: spoilers below
in the end Katherine does destroy the machine. There are repeated times earlier in the film where they try to destroy the machine but are physically prevented from doing so by the creatures.
.

And her whole reasoning for taking him back to the house is stupid. And the detective just accompanies them as if itís ok to enter the house a murder just occurred? And he just decided to hang with them?
In the very beginning it's explained that Katherine has been brought in to decide if Crawford is fit to stand trial. She gets permission from the lead detective to take him back to the crime scene (which is acknowledged in the writing as being unconventional, but allowed because of Katherine's reputation in the field), and they are accompanied by Browntree as the person making sure that Crawford stays under control.

But thanks for telling me Iím wrong to think a that way. 🤷
You're not wrong to think however you think about the film.

I think that the decisions made in the film are consistent with the characters, and I'm just arguing that characters making bad decisions isn't always a sign of bad writing. Many of the bad decisions are baked into the story as a way of seeing how the characters are being affected or warped by the Resonator. I think that the film provides plausible answers to pretty much every "But why did they . . ." question, and further I think that the character choices are internally consistent.

You and I may just have different metrics for "bad writing". For me, good writing is more about characters being consistent and the broader world of the film being consistent. And to me, From Beyond checks both of those boxes.



The trick is not minding
Crawford does try to destroy the machine. It is the first thing he does after the incident with Pretorius. And
WARNING: spoilers below
in the end Katherine does destroy the machine. There are repeated times earlier in the film where they try to destroy the machine but are physically prevented from doing so by the creatures.
.



In the very beginning it's explained that Katherine has been brought in to decide if Crawford is fit to stand trial. She gets permission from the lead detective to take him back to the crime scene (which is acknowledged in the writing as being unconventional, but allowed because of Katherine's reputation in the field), and they are accompanied by Browntree as the person making sure that Crawford stays under control.



You're not wrong to think however you think about the film.

I think that the decisions made in the film are consistent with the characters, and I'm just arguing that characters making bad decisions isn't always a sign of bad writing. Many of the bad decisions are baked into the story as a way of seeing how the characters are being affected or warped by the Resonator. I think that the film provides plausible answers to pretty much every "But why did they . . ." question, and further I think that the character choices are internally consistent.

You and I may just have different metrics for "bad writing". For me, good writing is more about characters being consistent and the broader world of the film being consistent. And to me, From Beyond checks both of those boxes.
He does at the beginning, and then doesnít until way later in the movie as I recall. Their attempts to destroy the machine are actually attempts to power it down, wasnít it? By shutting off the Main power?
Either way, they donít attempt to do that until much later. After they decide to sleep there.
Yeah, it is unconventional. Itís also bad writing to me as a clumsy throw away line to dismiss their reasonings to get us to not consider how illogical it is.

Youíre right that we have different metrics in terms of bad writing, though.



He does at the beginning, and then doesnít until way later in the movie as I recall. Their attempts to destroy the machine are actually attempts to power it down, wasnít it? By shutting off the Main power?

Either way, they donít attempt to do that until much later. After they decide to sleep there.
Yeah, it is unconventional. Itís also bad writing to me as a clumsy throw away line to dismiss their reasonings to get us to not consider how illogical it is.

Youíre right that we have different metrics in terms of bad writing, though.
I don't mind illogical choices in a film if it's in keeping with the story and the overall tone.

I actually don't find it all that odd that they decide to spend the night. As soon as they leave, they would all have to deal with unpleasantness. The detective is going to have to explain what he saw which will sound crazy. Katherine would have to give over control of the machine to someone else. And Crawford is probably going to have to go back to the mental hospital for "treatment". And at the point that they decide to spend the night, they've had their first "hit" from the Resonator.

For me, the characters and their arcs have enough momentum that as long as their actions are in a reasonable scope for them, I wasn't bothered by their choices.



Victim of The Night


I absolutely loved this film, and loved it in so many ways.

In many ways, this movie made me think superficially of Hellraiser, only a version where Kirsty kind of likes what she finds in the box.

What I loved the most about the film was the way in which it pulled off two equally strong character stories/arcs with both Crawford and Katherine.

Lastly, I just adored the ending. It was bold and memorable and really fitting for the disturbing story it was telling. I probably liked this one a good deal more than Re-Animator, and I'm surprised it's not mentioned more often.

Just wanted to comment specifically on the feelings you had here. First of all, I also fairly loved the movie on this second go-round.
I really connect with your bolded statement above. As you and I are both huge fans of Hellbound and the two doctors from the films are very similar, it seems a logical connection, but diverge, certainly in tone a good bit, but also over how the female lead responds to pandora's box.
I also liked how Katherine became practically the main character of the film, certainly in terms of the film's conflict and how Gordon made her and the conflict genuinely interesting.
And I also loved the ending.
Lastly, I also decided, after re-watching Re-Animator, that I prefer From Beyond. It just speaks to me more.



Victim of The Night
Thanks for all the recommendations!


I just watched Ghostkeeper, and it's exactly what I was looking for. It's probably more often compared to The Shining, but I'd compare it more with burnt Offerings. Great vibe, and just enough whack stuff to not break the mood. Strong recommendation to those here who haven't seen it. It's on youtube.
I came across this pretty randomly a few years ago and also ended up enjoying it quite a bit.
Cheers.



Victim of The Night
I wouldnít call it campy necessarily, but the gang motifs were definitely goofy at times. Iím thinking of the Baseball Furies and the gang on Rollerskates specifically.
Maybe I was just jaded when I watched this. But I didnít think it was that dark and definitely not edgy. Just some fun action.
That's maybe what I mean about time. When I was young we thought The Baseball Furies were about the most awesome, kick-ass thing ever. We didn't find them the slightest bit goofy, which is why I guess I was surprised to hear that word with this film, all these gangs were pretty badass to us, much more so than just another gang with leather jackets or something. These ****ers were crazy and therefore dangerous as hell.




The trick is not minding
That's maybe what I mean about time. When I was young we thought The Baseball Furies were about the most awesome, kick-ass thing ever. We didn't find them the slightest bit goofy, which is why I guess I was surprised to hear that word with this film, all these gangs were pretty badass to us, much more so than just another gang with leather jackets or something. These ****ers were crazy and therefore dangerous as hell.

I envy you were able to have seen this in the theatres. I wish I had been born before and could have gone to the theatres during the 70ís and early 80ís.*
My earliest memories are from 1984, maybe Ď83. I distinctly seeing Empire Strikes back with my older brother, but Iím sure that was a re release, considering the original release was Ď80, and I would have been 2. Far too young to remember it. *

Anyways, there was so much I would have love to have seen during that period. So many double bills. *

Anyways, itís still good, and I do enjoy it, regardless of any perceived goofiness on my part.



I don't know if the baseball gang is inherently cool or intimidating, but it helps when they're accompanied by Walter Hill's formidable visual style. I remember enjoying the movie, but prefer 48 Hrs and The Driver from Hill's work.


I also remember enjoying From Beyond, but prefer Re-animator thanks to its relentless narrative momentum. Ebert the phrase "insane tunnel vision", where everything that happens is the only thing that can happen thanks to the characters' natures. A deceptively sturdy narrative.



Victim of The Night
I don't know if the baseball gang is inherently cool or intimidating, but it helps when they're accompanied by Walter Hill's formidable visual style. I remember enjoying the movie, but prefer 48 Hrs and The Driver from Hill's work.
I do love 48 Hrs. I think that's a really under-appreciated movie.
This buddy team-up movie with the hot Saturday Night Live guy could have been crap like most of them but Hill and Co. had the stuff to make a pretty good cops and robbers movie. It just happens to feature a fast-talking convict and his world-weary, racist partner.



I mainline Windex and horse tranquilizer
That's maybe what I mean about time. When I was young we thought The Baseball Furies were about the most awesome, kick-ass thing ever. We didn't find them the slightest bit goofy, which is why I guess I was surprised to hear that word with this film, all these gangs were pretty badass to us, much more so than just another gang with leather jackets or something. These ****ers were crazy and therefore dangerous as hell.




CANNNNNNNNN YOUUUUUUUUUUU DIG IT!
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I mainline Windex and horse tranquilizer
I don't know if the baseball gang is inherently cool or intimidating, but it helps when they're accompanied by Walter Hill's formidable visual style. I remember enjoying the movie, but prefer 48 Hrs and The Driver from Hill's work.


I also remember enjoying From Beyond, but prefer Re-animator thanks to its relentless narrative momentum. Ebert the phrase "insane tunnel vision", where everything that happens is the only thing that can happen thanks to the characters' natures. A deceptively sturdy narrative.



I've always loved Streets of Fire, where Hill combines the cars and style of the 50's with present (at the time) day music and technology. (they flat-out say it's a world separate from our own) And if Willem Defoe in leather overalls doesn't scare the hell out of you then I got no time for you.



Victim of The Night
I've always loved Streets of Fire, where Hill combines the cars and style of the 50's with present (at the time) day music and technology. (they flat-out say it's a world separate from our own) And if Willem Defoe in leather overalls doesn't scare the hell out of you then I got no time for you.
Streets Of Fire is one of my favorite movies. If I believed in guilty pleasures, maybe I'd call it that, but I just love it.



Just wanted to comment specifically on the feelings you had here. First of all, I also fairly loved the movie on this second go-round.
I really connect with your bolded statement above. As you and I are both huge fans of Hellbound and the two doctors from the films are very similar, it seems a logical connection, but diverge, certainly in tone a good bit, but also over how the female lead responds to pandora's box.

I also liked how Katherine became practically the main character of the film, certainly in terms of the film's conflict and how Gordon made her and the conflict genuinely interesting.
Yes, I think that the most pleasant surprise of the film is the way that Katherine begins to follow the path that Pretorius followed (though starting from more benevolent intentions), and Crawford essentially becomes more of a witness. It was his fear of Pretorius that kept him from asserting himself earlier, and it's his affection for Katherine that troubles him the second time around. Again, I really like that his character is presented as kind of passive (and even borderline feminine or presented in a way you'd usually see with women, such as when Browntree carries him in his arms out of the basement).

With Kirsty, the S&M stuff is frightening because it's really coming from a place that lacks consent. Her uncle doesn't want her as a "partner" because he's interested in her pleasure---he wants her out of his own reasons and doesn't care how she feels about it.

But for Katherine, the sexual domination is an extension of her desire to be in control. I liked that the film didn't go the obvious route of just making her dress up sexy and be horny. Her sexual behaviors in the film morph from the sort-of acceptable (kissing Crawford) to the completely unethical sexual assault she commits in the second half. The detail of him still being injured and in pain does a good job of making it clear that this isn't a positive sexual fantasy we are seeing. Like Frank in Hellraiser, in that moment she doesn't care how her behavior is impacting Crawford and she completely disregards his feelings or his consent.

The way that Katherine follows and then diverges from Pretorius's path is a really neat character arc and it was such an unexpectedly good progression. I like that the film also shows us the flip side---her terror at the loss of dominance and control, something that goes back to seeing the way that her father was treated as a mental patient.

And I also loved the ending.
That
WARNING: spoilers below
insane, manic laughter from Katherine in the final moments earned the film an extra star from me, and I'm entirely serious about that.



I did not care for From Beyond. I gave it a C according to my record, so just average, but man, the sex stuff. I don't know if it's just me not really caring for the 70s/80sness of 70s/80s horror, but there was something there I did not jive with.


Somewhat of note, this is one of two, quote unquote, oversexed Lovecraft adaptation I'm aware of along with Alan Moore's Neonomicon , and almost a third one with Dagon, which is definitely more sexual than the story as I remember it. I come across, then and now, here and there, pieces on how HP's story have this prudishness to them despite an alleged underlying, boiling sexual element that some authors insist on bringing up in their adaptations. I might be in the minority in not seeing that. The Ghooric Zone short story is another ostentatiously sexual expanded universe story I just remembered.



I did not care for The Beyond. I gave it a C according to my record, so just average, but man, the sex stuff. I don't know if it's just me not really caring for the 70s/80sness of 70s/80s horror, but there was something there I did not jive with.
People keep saying "The Beyond" like the Fulci film, but we're all talking From Beyond, right?

Anyway, for me it sits right in there with a lot of Yuzna's stuff and Hennenlotter's stuff in terms of films with great/fun practical effects and a superficial appearance of exploitation that actually has more going on underneath than you'd expect from the premise or random screen-grabs.



I do love 48 Hrs. I think that's a really under-appreciated movie.
This buddy team-up movie with the hot Saturday Night Live guy could have been crap like most of them but Hill and Co. had the stuff to make a pretty good cops and robbers movie. It just happens to feature a fast-talking convict and his world-weary, racist partner.
"You said bull**** and experience is all it takes, right?"

"Right."

"Come on in and experience some of my bull****."



I do love 48 Hrs. I think that's a really under-appreciated movie.
This buddy team-up movie with the hot Saturday Night Live guy could have been crap like most of them but Hill and Co. had the stuff to make a pretty good cops and robbers movie. It just happens to feature a fast-talking convict and his world-weary, racist partner.
On that note, the Voir video essay series on Netflix has a really good episode on 48 Hrs. narrated by Walter Chaw. Well worth a watch if you're a fan of the movie.



I've always loved Streets of Fire, where Hill combines the cars and style of the 50's with present (at the time) day music and technology. (they flat-out say it's a world separate from our own) And if Willem Defoe in leather overalls doesn't scare the hell out of you then I got no time for you.
For some reason I've never gotten around to this. If it pops up on on one my services, I'll be sure to jump on it. Leather overalls Willem Dafoe sounds intriguing.