Breaking Down: Up

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You can't win an argument just by being right!

(But seriously, that joke gets a
, bumped to a
for actually finding a film release that fit the date.)

Tricky dicky. I was pretty impressed.



I read this all the way through a few hours ago but couldn't respond then because I had to go somewhere.

This is exactly the kind of stuff that I love to read. You did a great job! It's obvious that you put a lot of time into this. Just like all great passionate film analyses, it made me respect the film that was the subject of this in much more profound ways artistically than I did before.

I once read a great similar analysis of The Incredibles somewhere, but I'm not able to find it just this minute.

One lesson I learned from that essay is also pointed out by you in the beginning:

"This is one of the great strengths of digital animation: so much time goes into each shot that each frame is brimming with detail. When you have to create everything from scratch, nothing is there without a reason."

It's often mind-blowing to which artistic details filmmakers pay attention in order to express the themes of their films. Up is a great example of that. The level of depth that artists try to reach with their work is often underestimated by people who aren't artists.
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Cobpyth's Movie Log ~ 2019



If I can be pedantic for a moment, a group of baby birds is called a brood, not a litter.

Great essay. I can see why the film helped you decide to get married. The film really hammers home a lot of important ideas about life. You've made me want to see the film very much so.



You can't win an argument just by being right!
If I can be pedantic for a moment, a group of baby birds is called a brood, not a litter.
LMAO. I now have an image of flying puppies in my head.



If I can be pedantic for a moment, a group of baby birds is called a brood, not a litter.
Not pedantic at all; I spent so much time obsessing over all sorts of little details in this thing that I'm perfectly happy to accept more ways to improve it. Thank you, I'll update accordingly.

Great essay. I can see why the film helped you decide to get married. The film really hammers home a lot of important ideas about life. You've made me want to see the film very much so.
I'm definitely curious about what it's like to see the film after reading it when you'd never seen it before. I imagine the optimal setup is to see it, then read, then see it again, or maybe find a way to read "along," but if and when you do see it, let me know how it goes.



One lesson I learned from that essay is also pointed out by you in the beginning:

"This is one of the great strengths of digital animation: so much time goes into each shot that each frame is brimming with detail. When you have to create everything from scratch, nothing is there without a reason."
I also learned that, very clever thing to say
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Oh my god. They're trying to claim another young victim with the foreign films.



The scene at 14:35 is reminds me of the book The Little House.



The scene at 14:35 is reminds me of the book The Little House.
Interesting. Haven't read it. Could you elaborate on the similarities?
They never came back after posting this. Anyone else familiar with it?



Keep your station clean - OR I WILL KILL YOU
I adored your essay, so much. Being a huge fan of Pixar, and naturally of Up, as well, a lot of the metaphors I discovered on my own, but there are a few you pointed out that completely floored me. Especially the recurring metaphor of an empty place in one's heart. I really can't think of another film with this much attention to detail. I know Pete Docter loves to do this sort of stuff as he does the same with Inside Out. I know you posted this a while back, but again, congratulations on such a wonderful essay.



I adored your essay, so much. Being a huge fan of Pixar, and naturally of Up, as well, a lot of the metaphors I discovered on my own, but there are a few you pointed out that completely floored me. Especially the recurring metaphor of an empty place in one's heart. I really can't think of another film with this much attention to detail. I know Pete Docter loves to do this sort of stuff as he does the same with Inside Out. I know you posted this a while back, but again, congratulations on such a wonderful essay.
Boy, this makes my day. Thank you.

I particularly want to address this part:

a lot of the metaphors I discovered on my own, but there are a few you pointed out that completely floored me. Especially the recurring metaphor of an empty place in one's heart.
This was exactly how I felt watching it! I was amazed that things kept revealing themselves after so many viewings. It was so humbling to continually realize how much was there, and how long it took me to notice, even while it was staring me in the face.

And yeah, that's probably my favorite metaphor, too. I never even noticed the "gotta help you cross something" line, either, until I read it somewhere else (cited in the article). That blew my head open.



And I have wondered if I should try to do something similar with Inside Out. My personal connection to that film isn't as strong, of course, and I can't imagine it having quite the same extreme level of depth and layering as Up, but I'll bet there's a lot there.



Keep your station clean - OR I WILL KILL YOU
Boy, this makes my day. Thank you.

I particularly want to address this part:


This was exactly how I felt watching it! I was amazed that things kept revealing themselves after so many viewings. It was so humbling to continually realize how much was there, and how long it took me to notice, even while it was staring me in the face.

And yeah, that's probably my favorite metaphor, too. I never even noticed the "gotta help you cross something" line, either, until I read it somewhere else (cited in the article). That blew my head open.
I know! The "I gotta help you cross something" line is so noticeable now that I read the essay. I can't believe I didn't see it before, it's so great and subtle. Also, the turtle! I knew that Russel is supposed to represent Ellie, and more importantly, Ellie's enthusiasm for adventure, but I can't believe I never saw the turtle thing.



Keep your station clean - OR I WILL KILL YOU
And I have wondered if I should try to do something similar with Inside Out. My personal connection to that film isn't as strong, of course, and I can't imagine it having quite the same extreme level of depth and layering as Up, but I'll bet there's a lot there.
I adore Inside Out, Pete Docter truly deserves to be creative chief at Pixar, if it ever comes to a replacement. Whichever movie you do next, I will eat it up!



Sorry. Maybe.

But yeah, it's rough. Once it's burrowed into you, it doesn't take much. For me it's just those four notes mentioned in the essay. It's like an emotional cheat code: strike the correct four notes and you instantly make me cry.



Geez, I was perusing this essay and noticed a couple more things. I might have to update it. For example, in these mirrored shots...





...they take place in different seasons, too, to mirror the cycle of their lives. When they're young, it's summer, when they're old, it's fall.



Wow, this is a fantastic essay. I love Up, although not as much as I used to. But this essay really makes me want to see it again. Is there any way other members could get stuff in the Essays section (Id love to do the same thing you did for Spirited Away or Pulp Fiction or something).



Wow, this is a fantastic essay. I love Up, although not as much as I used to. But this essay really makes me want to see it again.
Thanks!

Is there any way other members could get stuff in the Essays section (Id love to do the same thing you did for Spirited Away or Pulp Fiction or something).
Sure, I'm open to it. I should warn you my standards are quite high, but if someone else wants to do something in this general vein, that'd be very cool. Most people just create their own thread so they can do whatever they want without my nitpicking, but if they don't mind that I'd be open to posting it in Essays.