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Think you used enough dynamite there, Butch?


Ugetsu Monogatari (Japan 1954)
++ Quite the fairy tale in its execution. The husbands irritated me and made it hard to watch, unfortunately.



The Poughkeepsie Tapes - John Erick Dowdle


- This as to be the most brutal, disturbing and realistic Serial Killer movie ever made.... you litteraly travel in the head of a psychopath with this movie and it's weird as f*ck. This was also a rewatch and I think I even find it more disturbing than the first time. I really realize how much this movie is pure sickness. I'm a fan of this kind of stuff and extreme cinema weirdos sh*t and it was probably the best of them all. If you like Extreme movie and realistic disturbing things you'll LOVE this flick. (Cricket I'm talking to you right here)
+
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but I'd be interested in hearing more about how the motivation and resolution surrounding the villain cheat the movie's message.
A day late, but I do want to answer this.
WARNING: "Kubo Spoilers" spoilers below
WARNING: spoilers below
Lying to the grandfather in an attempt to redeem him goes against everything that the movie had set up to that point. The film is clearly about memories and storytelling, and how memories of the dead live on through the stories told by the living. In the beginning, when Kubo's mother struggles to remember her husband, it is meant to be sad. When Kubo's father has his memories taken away, it is seen as a tragedy by every character. The Moon King robbing them of their memories and stories is such a horrible thing that it initially motivates Kubo, both in his decision to become the town storyteller as well as his decision to trust the Beetle warrior. But at the end, Kubo and the townspeople essentially steal the memories of the grandfather, denying him his story as well as the story of his children, and the audience is supposed to think that this is a cause for celebration. It can't go both ways. By performing the same action as the villain at the beginning of the movie's timeframe, Kubo has literally become what he quested to defeat.

Non-spoiler version/TLDR: When the villain does something to a supporting hero, it's an evil action that motivates the story. When Kubo does the same thing to the villain, it's a happy resolution. "evil" and "happy" are polar opposites, as are "motivation" and "resolution". The thematic inconsistency means that one of those events must nullify the other.



The Poughkeepsie Tapes - John Erick Dowdle


- This as to be the most brutal, disturbing and realistic Serial Killer movie ever made.... you litteraly travel in the head of a psychopath with this movie and it's weird as f*ck. This was also a rewatch and I think I even find it more disturbing than the first time. I really realize how much this movie is pure sickness. I'm a fan of this kind of stuff and extreme cinema weirdos sh*t and it was probably the best of them all. If you like Extreme movie and realistic disturbing things you'll LOVE this flick. (Cricket I'm talking to you right here)
+
The guy who directed such classics as Quarantine and Devil directed the most disturbing film ever made?

I don't believe you.



The guy who directed such classics as Quarantine and Devil directed the most disturbing film ever made?

I don't believe you.
You should try it... I don't like Quarantine and Devil either...



Frankenstein (1931)



This was better than I expected, but I thought the part about giving the monster an abnormal brain was kind of unnecessary because the monster wasn't really a murderer. In most cases, when he killed, he either didn't realize what he was doing or he was defending himself. That made him a very sympathetic character.






Bride of Frankenstein (1935)



Not bad, but not as good as the first movie. I expected the Bride to be in more of the movie, and when we finally do see her, it's kind of a letdown. Also, the monster loses some of his sympathy in this movie.






The Mummy (1932)



This movie was just okay, but not because it's a horror movie. I think the whole Mummy concept just isn't my thing. I found most of it kind of boring.

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There's an unintentionally funny scene in Frankenstein that I always laugh at.
The creature enters Elizabeth's bridal suite and when he sees her he lets out a "Raaorrr!"
But it comes off like in the old days when guys would make a growling noise to express their attraction to a woman (kind of like "hubba hubba!")
Karloff was supposed to sound like an angry monster, but he comes off sounding like, "Whoa! I just found myself a hottie! Raorrrr!"



In the Heart of the Sea (2015)

I enjoyed this fictionalized account of Herman Melville receiving the inspiration for his novel Moby Dick from the youngest survivor (now aged) of the whaling ship Essex, which in real life was struck and sank by a sperm whale. The first mate wrote an account of the disaster, which greatly inspired Melville. But that was not the only inspiration for the book. Melville, as a young man had served aboard a whaling vessel for a time, and there was also an account of a white whale that had attacked many ships, usually off the coast of Chile. He took these various accounts and molded his own tale into a novel. The youngest survivor did not give Melville an account as depicted in the movie. Why the filmmakers decided to go with the youngest survivor tale instead of just telling the tale, I don't know but it's still an enthralling movie. I guess by the time he wrote the tale, a younger crew member would be the only one still living, but I don't know.

Anyway, the cast is excellent, led by Liam Hemsworth as the first mate, Cillian Murphy as his best friend, Benjamin Walker as the captain of the Essex, the awesome Brendan Gleeson as the now-old crew member telling Melville his tale, Ben Whishaw as Melville, and Tom Holland as the younger version of Brendan Gleeson. They all mesh together great, and director Ron Howard makes this "based-on" true life story compelling all the way through. The sea-going scenes are fine and the attacks by the white whale are realistic. Besides the whale attack, there are several other disasters and setbacks that prey on the men. A well-done movie that I wouldn't mind seeing again.



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Welcome to the human race...
A day late, but I do want to answer this.
WARNING: "Kubo Spoilers" spoilers below
WARNING: spoilers below
Lying to the grandfather in an attempt to redeem him goes against everything that the movie had set up to that point. The film is clearly about memories and storytelling, and how memories of the dead live on through the stories told by the living. In the beginning, when Kubo's mother struggles to remember her husband, it is meant to be sad. When Kubo's father has his memories taken away, it is seen as a tragedy by every character. The Moon King robbing them of their memories and stories is such a horrible thing that it initially motivates Kubo, both in his decision to become the town storyteller as well as his decision to trust the Beetle warrior. But at the end, Kubo and the townspeople essentially steal the memories of the grandfather, denying him his story as well as the story of his children, and the audience is supposed to think that this is a cause for celebration. It can't go both ways. By performing the same action as the villain at the beginning of the movie's timeframe, Kubo has literally become what he quested to defeat.

Non-spoiler version/TLDR: When the villain does something to a supporting hero, it's an evil action that motivates the story. When Kubo does the same thing to the villain, it's a happy resolution. "evil" and "happy" are polar opposites, as are "motivation" and "resolution". The thematic inconsistency means that one of those events must nullify the other.
That is a good point, though it does hinge on one question:

WARNING: "Kubo" spoilers below
Check me if I'm wrong on this, but is Kubo ever shown to be erasing the Moon King's memories on purpose? What makes the Moon King villainous in the first place is that he deliberately took memories away from Kubo's parents and, by extension, what made them human. The Moon King isn't human - in his original form, he is an ethereal demon-like being who is defined by his complete lack of substance and inability to change. His most villainous actions are driven by a refusal to change, which extends to him trying to force Kubo and his mother back into the same stagnant and uncaring limbo as both him and the twin sisters. As a result, when he is rendered human it has the side-effect of causing him to forget his "true" form (similar to how Kubo's father lost his identity while being turned into a beetle). Kubo and the villagers don't "steal" his memories - he just forgets them and becomes nothing more than a frail, confused old man. There's no point in killing him or even telling him the truth about himself - those options are even liable to come across as downright cruel to this old man. By opting to tell a different story to the Moon King, Kubo and the villagers demonstrate the sort of human compassion that the Moon King simply did not have and considered a weakness. If the Moon King's motivation is to turn Kubo and his mother into demons like him because he considers humans weak, then a resolution that proves how strong humans can be is the most natural resolution.


That's my take, anyway.

Last movie I watched...

Hopscotch -
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As promised, my reaction, in spoiler tags:
Something further about The Eclipse that occurred to me today:

WARNING: spoilers below
The disturbing notion that Malachy's suicide might be the reason his ghost is restless and hostile, as if he's trapped in limbo.



The Poughkeepsie Tapes (2007)




I had this movie on my watchlist for a while, and finally put it on thanks to Derek's recommendation. This is a documentary and found footage style horror film that follows the doings of a serial killer. It's effectively sick, and not for most people. It plays out like one of those true crime TV shows, with tapes being found of the killer filming his actions. Some of the acting and dialogue is mediocre at best, but this is pretty solid for fans of disturbing movies.



Nothing good comes from staying with normal people
The great Escape (1963)



Yet again I have to say basically a good movie if a bit slow, though this time it's the last 50 minutes that drag, which harms the movie more than a little. At 2 h 52 min you could have cut a good 20 min without it harming the overall story. The moments of levity that's sprinkled throughout helps to combat the slower parts, but in the end I think it's a 'one and done' movie that needn't be repeated unless there's a 10 year gap between showings
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Films and films
10 Cloverfield Lane By Dan Trachtenberg

Nothing spectacular by still an interesting movie
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Films and films



Please Quote/Tag Or I'll Miss Your Responses
My Dinner With Andre - 10/10

There's a friend I talk to on the phone with for hours every day. He never wants to talk about movies, but he recommended me this, and I loved it. There are parts that were annoying (Andre rambling about nothing) but I love conversational movies that talk about something.