The Movie Forums Top 100 of All-Time Refresh: Countdown

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My Top 10 guesses...
  1. The Godfather
  2. 2001: A Space Odyssey
  3. Goodfellas
  4. Raiders of the Lost Ark
  5. Pulp Fiction
  6. Jaws
  7. Casablanca
  8. Citizen Kane
  9. Apocalypse Now
  10. Blade Runner

I attempted to guess ranking as much as I could, but who knows.
Should've stuck with my initial guess. I guess I have to swap Kane and Blade Runner, which will be the next.
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That sound was my tears falling as my Fargo hopes were dashed.

I think Apocalypse Now is really great. I definitely need to see it for a second time. Just bummed Fargo didn't even hit the 100. I really thought it was the most popular Coen.
If it's any consolation, it is my favorite Coen, closely followed by The Big Lebowski and No Country for Old Men. Had it at #32 on my list, though.
I think it's my second favourite, behind Inside Llewyn Davis, but it's probably only my love for the music in that film that gives it the edge. I agree with sean it is surprising not to see it find a place on this list.

Well that's my prediction out the window. Again like sean I really liked Apocalypse Now but it never had a chance of making my list because I haven't seen it in so long.

While waiting for number nine, here are a bunch of my ballot choices that did not make it...
Lovely write up Holden, out of those I'm particularly sad not to have seen Amelie, which I thought for a long time was a cert.
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No Country, Barton Fink, and Llewyn Davis are all really close for me but I just love Fargo so much. It started my Coen love.
I need to see Llewyn Davis. I think it's the most notable of them that I haven't seen.





Apocalypse Now was also #9 on the MoFo '70s List.

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That sound was my tears falling as my Fargo hopes were dashed.

I think Apocalypse Now is really great. I definitely need to see it for a second time. Just bummed Fargo didn't even hit the 100. I really thought it was the most popular Coen.
Didn't vote for it but it should have made it. I'll make a list after the countdown of the biggest snubs in my opinion.



Bright light. Bright light. Uh oh.
I have my own kind of love for Apocalypse Now. No, it's not so deep and natural as what I have for Jaws, where you love something so much that you'll accept and adore it, warts and all. I love Coppola's spectacle for what it attempted to do and what it was able to accompish. I better love it since I've seen it over 15 times in its various incarnations.

There are so many perfect scenes, and Coppola wields so much technical prowess, showering the audience with cinema which demands to be seen and heard on the big screen. I do not consider it a masterpiece, except in the integration of some spectacular sights and sounds and a few excellent performances. I would agree with the words "meandering", "self-indulgent" and "overlong", but I would certainly advise everyone to watch it and decide for themselves. Yet somehow, to me, Coppola lost his way and became another Kurtz, losing the thread, trying to piece together a third act from bits and pieces, shadows, insane babblings from Hopper and Brando, and allegorical meaning tying the story's unraveling to that of the Vietnam War itself. Many of the film's staunchest defenders deny there's anything imperfect about it or if there is, it's supposed to be there and they love it. Welcome to my world of Jaws love.

The Redux version does add what I consider to be satirically-hilarious scenes involving a surfboard and a beautiful visual explanation of what happened to one of the main characters, but I think the original is too long as it is, so I'd watch the original first. There are about 50 added minutes in Redux, and most of those are towards the end which is already overextended in my opinion. I'd still say to watch it at some future time.

I'll probanly add some comments about those on my ballot which did not place [the blue ones below], but for now, here they are.

My List
1.
2. Elmer Gantry
3. Midnight Cowboy
4. Star Wars
5.
6. Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
7. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
8. Little Big Man
9. Cabaret
10. The Incredibles
11. LOTR: The Return of the King
12. Schindler's List
13.
14. War and Peace (1966) full 7 hr. version
15. Alice in Wonderland (1951)
16. Back to the Future
17. Richard Pryor Live in Concert
18.
19. The Innocents
20. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
21. American Graffiti
22. Pygmalion
23. Paths of Glory
24.
25. The Graduate

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The movie that I predicted as #10 becomes #9, nice , good guess on #9 @rauldc14
Wasn't my official pick though so I'm bummed



I had Apocalypse Now at #42. I love it, but it just missed the cut. It's one of those films I saw a long time ago and liked it for "the bangs", but that I've come to really appreciate more and more with each rewatch for its depth and harrowing portrayal of war. Also, any fan of it should definitely check Hearts of Darkness to grasp how much of a hellhole the filming was.



I think we should talk about our lists after countdown is done, but too late.



I like a Apocalypse Now a lot, even though I feel like the third act is a bit clumsier than the rest of the film. Contrary to just about everyone, I'm not a fan of Brando's performance here. Sheen, on the other hand, is a perfect Willard (Marlow)--the onlooker role is, I think, harder than it looks, and Sheen makes it compelling. (And, I guess, some credit here should go to his brother Joe Estevez for the voiceovers and some standing in after Sheen's heart attack.) It didn't make my list, but given its array of memorable lines, visuals, and music I would have been surprised not to see it here.



I like a Apocalypse Now a lot, even though I feel like the third act is a bit clumsier than the rest of the film. Contrary to just about everyone, I'm not a fan of Brando's performance here. Sheen, on the other hand, is a perfect Willard (Marlow)--the onlooker role is, I think, harder than it looks, and Sheen makes it compelling. (And, I guess, some credit here should go to his brother Joe Estevez for the voiceovers and some standing in after Sheen's heart attack.) It didn't make my list, but given its array of memorable lines, visuals, and music I would have been surprised not to see it here.
Do you mean specifically once they reach Kurtz' camp?




My List
3. Midnight Cowboy
8. Little Big Man
25. The Graduate
I am not at all surprised to officially learn that the lack of Dustin Hoffman on the collective list was definitely not Mark's doing. He tried!

I ♥ Dusty



I think we should talk about our lists after countdown is done, but too late.
There ain't no chance any of the films I listed are in these remaining eight. But different strokes and all.



Apocalypse Now was a classic I took awhile to see, admired well enough when I saw it, but really have no emotional connection to and no plans to watch again any time soon. That's usually my reaction to any film that spends a lot of time detailing someone's degrading mental state. I can appreciate its ability to try to put the sound-minded into a contrary situation, but it's not the kind of thing I feel the impulse to revisit, or find enjoyable on a deep level.



Wasn't my official pick though so I'm bummed
Well atleast you said you could see Apocalypse Now showing too even though you predicted Blade Runner, watch Blade Runner will be next .



There ain't no chance any of the films I listed are in these remaining eight. But different strokes and all.
I really thought La La would make it on the back end. After Hours would have been sweet.



Apocalypse Now was a classic I took awhile to see, admired well enough when I saw it, but really have no emotional connection to and no plans to watch again any time soon. That's usually my reaction to any film that spends a lot of time detailing someone's degrading mental state. I can appreciate its ability to try to put the sound-minded into a contrary situation, but it's not the kind of thing I feel the impulse to revisit, or find enjoyable on a deep level.
Have you watched Hearts of Darkness: A Filmmaker's Apocalypse? I think it is a must-see for every and any film fan interested in the filmmaking process. Whether or not one loves, loathes, or is indifferent to Apocalypse Now it is a fascinating document. And ultimately I think it does improve one's appreciation for Coppola's film.

As for the original cut vs. Redux, I greatly prefer the original film as is. I think the extra scenes work wonderfully as supplements but dilute the power of the narrative. I think they were good cuts, though individually there are some good scenes. The stop at the French plantation is the scene that makes the most sense intellectually - to have that colonial period of Vietnam's history be represented as the boat gets further upriver towards the primeval chaos of Kurtz. But it is also by far the weakest scene.




Do you mean specifically once they reach Kurtz' camp?
Yes, pretty much. I gather Coppola had some trouble with the ending (and Brando had trouble with his lines) and I think it shows. It doesn't quite drag everything down, and there are still some beautiful shots and bits in the conclusion, but it's not on a par with everything that came before it.