Music-wise, What's Your Latest Discovery?

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Annie Stela - yet another folky.

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Miles Davis
John Coltrane

so basicly Jazz, free Jazz to be precise, loving it ^^
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Originally Posted by Piddzilla
Death Cab For Cutie. My buddy, who's a big fan since long, has tried to sell them to me for a couple of CDs now, but it's not until their new release, "Plans", that they caught me. Brilliant pop melodies, without being cheesy, cool drums and rythms, creative and personal. And melancholic... I'll have to check out their previous CD now. That one is supposed to be their best apparently.
Plans and Transatlanticism are indeed their two best albums. If you like them you might want to check if you like The Postal Service, soft-electronic music with lyrics and singing by the singer of DCFC



Lost in never never land
Recent discovery would be: House of Heroes

They are a smaller Christian group, however most people wouldn't guess it from their lyrics. Their lyrics tend to be tame, but it isn't a strong Christian message to make it obvious.

Stylistically they are a rock group. Not that hard a rock group, but still harder then most of what is considered soft rock. I can't think of any good comparisons right now.
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He wasn't there again today,
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I got for good luck my black tooth.
Originally Posted by Unas
Miles Davis
John Coltrane

so basicly Jazz, free Jazz to be precise, loving it ^^
Free-jazz follows no music theory. The Music of Miles Davis was improvised, but often based around a progression of scales or modes. Sun-Ra and Ornette Coleman made free jazz. I don't mean to be a snob or anything...
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Originally Posted by Strummer521
Free-jazz follows no music theory. The Music of Miles Davis was improvised, but often based around a progression of scales or modes. Sun-Ra and Ornette Coleman made free jazz. I don't mean to be a snob or anything...
Ah ok, i was only repeating what i've read, still learning/finding out about jazz, so thanks for the feedback



Probably said this before but:

Spiral Architect - started getting back into them, and wow....very technical stuff. not the most melodic but i love it, even though they are just being insanely technical for the hell of it.



A system of cells interlinked
Originally Posted by Strummer521
Free-jazz follows no music theory. The Music of Miles Davis was improvised, but often based around a progression of scales or modes. Sun-Ra and Ornette Coleman made free jazz. I don't mean to be a snob or anything...
Curious. DO you mean they just play out of key? Music theory isn't a set of rules to be bent or broken, it's just how music works. A 440 is always A 440. Just wondering what makes free jazz, free jazz. rapid time sig changes? Playing out of key? A group of musicians spewing haphazard phreneticisms, whilst not paying attention to one another (sounds like my old band, in other words )?

I have had many people attempt to claim that they are "breaking the rules" of music theory, but that just isn't possible. For instance, when someone plays a -7b5 chord, they are playing a chord. When someone plays a bunch of chromatic notes together that don't fit into any known keys, they are still playing a chord, just one that sounds bad and doesn't fit into a standard key. They are still within the restraints of theory though, as they are using the same notes that make up keys, but are attempting to utilize unavailable tensions between said notes.

I mean, one can break the rules of basic harmony, by playing out of key, but they are still playing a G, or a C, or an F#, when they fret the respective frets on a guitar. Get what I mean? The theory behind the notes is just how music works, while the harmonic rules we have come to respect and our ears have become accustomed to dictates what sounds dissonant, and what doesn't, to our ears. When considering harmony, sure, "rules" can be broken, and people can fret all over the place playing whichever notes they choose to play with whichever other notes they choose. The theory behind the keys and the music are still intact. This may sound like double talk, but theory is sort of the physics of music, while harmony et al is the interpretation of theory that sounds good to various cultures, depending on how their ears were trained. To experience a difference in harmonic perception, check out some of the asian music that utilizes quarter tones. The stuff sounds bizzare to my ear, but natural and normal to those raised around it. On the flip side, some of the classical that we have come to respect and recognize as harmonically correct sounds totally bizzare to these same people.

I was able to discuss this with a Japanese friend of mine that was attempting to get into writing "American" music, as she called it. She was stumped. She had written and recorded a couple of mellow ambient pieces, and had played them out at some various clubs around Boston, only to be met with an empty room after the pieces had been played. She was bummed that her music would drive people out of the room, and asked me to give it a listen. The thing is, she had recorded a sort of drifty vocal over the ambient music, and she had used some tensions that weren't available in the key she had written sort-of vanilla music in. She explained the vocal was inspired by some japanese stylings she had loved as a kid. To me, it sounded like a girl singing out of key, but when she played the original recording of the japanese music for me, it used the same strange sort of quarter tone intervals. This was backed by music using the same methods, so it sounded ok, although very strange to my ears. Her attempt to combine the two schools was a cool idea, but just didn't work, as she was trying to place a bunch of slightly sharp tones over a simple western 1, b6, 7 progression.

We also discussed theory and how she wanted to break the bonds of said theory, which led us to a discussion about harmony sort of like this one....
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I got for good luck my black tooth.
Originally Posted by Sedai
Curious. DO you mean they just play out of key? Music theory isn't a set of rules to be bent or broken, it's just how music works. A 440 is always A 440. Just wondering what makes free jazz, free jazz. rapid time sig changes? Playing out of key? A group of musicians spewing haphazard phreneticisms, whilst not paying attention to one another (sounds like my old band, in other words )?

I have had many people attempt to claim that they are "breaking the rules" of music theory, but that just isn't possible. For instance, when someone plays a -7b5 chord, they are playing a chord. When someone plays a bunch of chromatic notes together that don't fit into any known keys, they are still playing a chord, just one that sounds bad and doesn't fit into a standard key. They are still within the restraints of theory though, as they are using the same notes that make up keys, but are attempting to utilize unavailable tensions between said notes.

I mean, one can break the rules of basic harmony, by playing out of key, but they are still playing a G, or a C, or an F#, when they fret the respective frets on a guitar. Get what I mean? The theory behind the notes is just how music works, while the harmonic rules we have come to respect and our ears have become accustomed to dictates what sounds dissonant, and what doesn't, to our ears. When considering harmony, sure, "rules" can be broken, and people can fret all over the place playing whichever notes they choose to play with whichever other notes they choose. The theory behind the keys and the music are still intact. This may sound like double talk, but theory is sort of the physics of music, while harmony et al is the interpretation of theory that sounds good to various cultures, depending on how their ears were trained. To experience a difference in harmonic perception, check out some of the asian music that utilizes quarter tones. The stuff sounds bizzare to my ear, but natural and normal to those raised around it. On the flip side, some of the classical that we have come to respect and recognize as harmonically correct sounds totally bizzare to these same people.

I was able to discuss this with a Japanese friend of mine that was attempting to get into writing "American" music, as she called it. She was stumped. She had written and recorded a couple of mellow ambient pieces, and had played them out at some various clubs around Boston, only to be met with an empty room after the pieces had been played. She was bummed that her music would drive people out of the room, and asked me to give it a listen. The thing is, she had recorded a sort of drifty vocal over the ambient music, and she had used some tensions that weren't available in the key she had written sort-of vanilla music in. She explained the vocal was inspired by some japanese stylings she had loved as a kid. To me, it sounded like a girl singing out of key, but when she played the original recording of the japanese music for me, it used the same strange sort of quarter tone intervals. This was backed by music using the same methods, so it sounded ok, although very strange to my ears. Her attempt to combine the two schools was a cool idea, but just didn't work, as she was trying to place a bunch of slightly sharp tones over a simple western 1, b6, 7 progression.

We also discussed theory and how she wanted to break the bonds of said theory, which led us to a discussion about harmony sort of like this one....
Right. Interesting point. In this situation, I'm using theory maybe not for it's typical definition, but as a word to represent the idea, that until free jazz became a noted sub-genre, there were basic principles that were basically always followed in jazz.

The following is qouted from Jazz 101: A Complete Guide to Learning and Loving Jazz by John F. Szwed

By the 1960s, jazz had reached a certain level of comfort. There were informal rules as to what was effective in improvisation, and there were objective standards of success. [free jazz] would make rhythm unreliable for listeners, leaving them with no sense of regularity. Soon, some new players would use volume, texture, grain, tone color, and other sonic variables to create variation and interest, demanding of the listener a focus and the appreciation of sound for its own sake.

In other words, all the elements of music and jazz in particular were either warped beyond recognition or discarded. It is "free" in the sense that there were no standards or limits defining the genre. Hopefully that clears things up a bit.



Chicks dig Lord of the Rings, Randal
Logan Square
Not really all that new but their first full length album just came out not too long ago. They used to be called 15 Minutes Late, they are from my neck of the woods and used to get a lot of play on the college station out here.
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Oranger. A friend sent me their outstanding cover of "Mr. Sandman". You have to admire a band who can use a theramin without crossing the line into irony. And, although it took some doing I managed to track down their latest album. Marvellous.



How I have missed this group until now is a mystery.
Heard two of Los Lobos' songs and now I'm very interested.
Their version of La Bamba and This train don't stop here anymore.
Are they worth persuing?
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Kurt Weill Alabama Song (Whisky Bar)...(for years I thought The Doors wrote it) Listen to this version lol, it's great stuff! It has this polka sorta sound to it.





The Teenage Shutdown comps.

Soundtrack to my summer.



I've finally got round to listening to the whole Hold Your Colour album my Pendulum, some proper tunes outside the ones not always in repeat in clubs.
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there's a frog in my snake oil
I've taken to sticking Herzog's The Wild Blue Yonder on in the background just to listen to. Here's an excerpt from the website to show yous why

(I don't think there's an album out anywhere. It's probably a bit too visually tied up to really work anyway. And besides, i couldn't afford it right now either )
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Virtual Reality chatter on a movie site? Got endless amounts of it here. Reviews over here



El Pus...Outkast meets Fishbone meets Op Ivy...good ****!
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